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Ohba H.,University of Tokyo | Saito M.,Miyazaki Prefectural Museum of Nature and History
Journal of Japanese Botany | Year: 2012

A new species of the genus Padus (Rosaceae-Prunoideae), R nakatakei H. Ohba & Mas. Saito, from the Morotsuka area, Miyazaki Prefecture, Kyushu, Japan, is described. It is similar to P. obtusata (Koehne) T. T. Yu & T. C. Ku and R ssiori (F. Schmidt) C. K. Schneid. Padus obtusata from China and Taiwan differs from R nakatakei in having racemes with two leaves and leaves with crenulate margins. Padus ssiori differs in the leaves with a cordate base and glabrous pedicels 7-8 mm long. Source


Kadota Y.,National Museum of Nature and Science | Saito M.,Miyazaki Prefectural Museum of Nature and History
Journal of Japanese Botany | Year: 2010

Two new species of Croomia (Stemonaceae), C. saitoana Kadota and C. hyugaensis Kadota & Mas. Saito, are here described from Miyazaki Pref., Kyushu, southern Japan. Croomia saitoana differs from C. japonica Miq. [= C. kiusiana Makino] in having small, solitary, dark purplish brown flowers, thicker and shorter staminal filaments, thicker purplish stem, the absence of bracts and (6-)7-11 cauline leaves with 3-5 veins. Croomia hyugaensis is distinguished from C. japónica by having solitary flower, entire leaf margin, 4-6, slightly fleshy, cordate cauline leaves with cordate base; from C. saitoana by larger flowers, longer staminal filaments, slender green stem, prominent, linear to spathulate bracts and 4-6, slightly fleshy, cordate cauline leaves with 5-7 veins and entire margins. Croomia hyugaensis and C. saitoana are known exclusively from Miyazaki Pref., Kyushu, and are the forth and the fifth species in the genus Croomia, respectively. A key to the species of the genus Croomia is also provided. Source


Sugimura K.,Japan National Institute of Biomedical Innovation | Ilda O.,Japan National Institute of Biomedical Innovation | Katsuki S.,Japan National Institute of Biomedical Innovation | Murata H.,Setsunan University | And 6 more authors.
Journal of Japanese Botany | Year: 2010

Habitat and essential oils of Callicarpa longissima (Hemsl.) Merr. (Verbenaceae) in the Tanegashima (Kagoshima Pref.) and the Nichinan (Miyazaki Pref.) populations, southern Japan, were comparatively studied. Leaves from the Tanegashima population were covered with glandular hairs more densely than those of the Nichinan population and included several characteristic odorants, i.e., 2-pentanone, 1, 8-cineole, cis-3-hexenal, linalool and methyl salicylate. Materials from the Tanegashima population are consequently evaluated to be effective to aromatherapy. The Nichinan population was considered to be important for the conservation of the species because many seedlings were found in this population. It was also clarified that the species preferred the habitats with relatively high temperature, high humidity and much sunlight. Source


Kadota Y.,National Museum of Nature and Science | SAiTO M.,Miyazaki Prefectural Museum of Nature and History
Journal of Japanese Botany | Year: 2013

A new species of Syneilesis (Asteraceae), 5. akagii Kadota & Mas. Saito, is described from Kyushu, southern Japan. Syneilesis akagii is close to 5. palmata (Thunb.) Maxim, but is distinguished from the latter in having grayish to pale purplish brown, longer involucres, glaucous undersurface of leaves with rising veinlets, longer corollae and longer achenes. Female florets are reported in the genus for the first time. Source


Kadota Y.,National Museum of Nature and Science | Saito M.,Miyazaki Prefectural Museum of Nature and History
Journal of Japanese Botany | Year: 2010

Aconitum jaluense Kom. subsp. jaluense, one of endangered species in Japan, is first reported from the northern mountains of Miyazaki Pref., Kyushu, southern Japan. The Aconitum population was estimated to be composed of approximately more than 1000 individuals and is the largest at least in Japan. Although another aconite, A. japonicum Thunb. subsp. napiforme (H. Lév. & Vaniot) Kadota, was also found in the lower part of the mountain, no intermediates between the two aconites were recognized in the population. Source

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