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Orlando, FL, United States

DeMarco J.,Mitsubishi Power Systems Americas | Karl J.,Mitsubishi Power Systems Americas | Sohn Y.,Mitsubishi Power Systems Americas | Gordon A.P.,Mitsubishi Power Systems Americas
Materials at High Temperatures | Year: 2013

Aluminum metal-matrix composites are lightweight materials that have the potential to supplant steel in many applications. The current work helps to identify the parameters that confer maximal strength and ductility. Torsion tests were performed on the as-cast aluminum metal-matrix composite A359-SiCp- 30% at a variety of temperatures and twist rates. Dependence of material properties on temperature and strain rate were identified from equivalent stress-strain curves constructed from the reduced data. Examination of the microstructure was performed on the as-cast material and on fracture surfaces. A temperature- and strain rate-dependent constitutive model was applied to simulation of the mechanical response of the torsion specimen. Trends in material properties corroborate and extend trends identified previously under tensile loading with regard to temperature and strain rate dependence. Shear properties of simulated specimens agree with properties obtained through experimentation. Source


DeMarco J.,Mitsubishi Power Systems Americas | Karl J.,Mitsubishi Power Systems Americas | Sohn Y.,Mitsubishi Power Systems Americas | Gordon A.P.,Mitsubishi Power Systems Americas
Materials at High Temperatures | Year: 2013

Lightweight, nano-structured aluminum metal-matrix composites (MMCs) have been identified as a next-generation armoring material due to their low density and high strength. The properties of A359- SiCp-30% are investigated here, with the aim of reducing material loss to edge cracking during the hot rolling process through characterization of the deformation and rupture behavior at high temperatures and moderate strain rates. Multiaxial isotropic constitutive equations designed for modeling the thermomechanical processing response of a lightweight MMC are developed. The model incorporates both strain rate and temperature dependence of the inelastic response. Tensile tests were performed on A359-SiCp-30% samples to validate the model. By means of a finite element analysis, the constitutive model was applied to simulate the tensile response, and a strong correlation with the experimental data was achieved. Metallurgical analyses were carried out on tensile-tested samples to determine the microstructural mechanisms leading to tensile rupture. Source

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