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News Article | September 19, 2016
Site: www.greencarcongress.com

« Ilika to work with Johnson Matthey on 3-year project to develop protected anodes for Li-S batteries | Main | Cypress sampling new Traveo MCU solutions for secure, high-speed networking for automotive body electronics » At the LCV 2016 event in the UK last week, Delta Motorsport unveiled a new low-cost micro-turbine applied as a range-extended in an electric car. The company developed the E-4 Coupe extended-range electric electric vehicle in a £3.1-million (US$4-million) collaborative R&D project. The Office for Low Emission Vehicles (OLEV) and Innovate UK co-funded the project. The new system, dubbed MiTRE (Micro Turbine Range Extender), is specifically designed for use as a range extender for electric vehicles. Delta has produced two complete MiTRE prototype systems with 17 kW power output; one is fitted into the E-4 Coupe for further development. The project was a collaboration between Delta Motorsport, Productiv, Hieta Technologies, the University of Bath, Schaeffler and Equipmake. The device features small, lightweight turbo-machinery attached to an electric generator. This keeps the battery pack charged up or at least slows the power drain. The MiTRE project sprang from Delta’s early work on electric vehicles in 2008-10, and it’s great to see the results of our efforts and those of our partners in the program. We now have a huge amount of interest in the system from automotive OEMs and Tier 1s, because we’ve focused from the start of the project on keeping the system small, light and inexpensive. Further developments in progress now will also reduce emissions (including NO ) to extremely low levels.


Weinstein Y.S.,MITRE Inc
Physical Review A - Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics | Year: 2013

We simulate the implementation of a T gate, or π8 gate, for a [7,1,3] encoded logical qubit in a nonequiprobable error environment. We demonstrate that the use of certain non-fault-tolerant methods in the implementation may nevertheless enable reliable quantum computation while reducing basic resource consumption. Reliability is determined by calculating gate fidelities for the one-qubit logical gate. Specifically, we show that despite using a non-fault-tolerant procedure in constructing a logical zero ancilla to implement the T gate, the gate fidelity of the logical gate, after perfect error correction, has no first order error terms. Meaning, any errors that may have occurred during implementation are "correctable" and fault tolerance may still be achieved. © 2013 American Physical Society.


Weinstein Y.S.,MITRE Inc
Physical Review A - Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics | Year: 2013

We explore the implementation of pseudorandom single-qubit rotations and multiqubit pseudorandom circuits constructed only from Clifford gates and the T gate, a phase rotation of π/4. Such a gate set would be appropriate for computations performed in a fault tolerant setting. For single-qubit rotations the distribution of parameters found for unitaries constructed from Clifford plus T quickly approaches that of random rotations and requires significantly fewer gates than the construction of arbitrary single-qubit rotations. For Clifford-plus-T pseudorandom circuits we find an exponential convergence to a random matrix element distribution and a Gaussian convergence to the higher-order moments of the matrix element distribution. In addition, the nearest-neighbor eigenangle statistics distribution almost immediately converges to that of random unitary matrices. All of these convergence rates are found to be insensitive to the number of qubits. © 2013 American Physical Society.


Weinstein Y.S.,MITRE Inc | Buchbinder S.D.,MITRE Inc
Physical Review A - Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics | Year: 2012

We explore the effect of Shor-state construction methods on logical state encoding and quantum error-correction for the [7,1,3] Calderbank-Shor-Steane quantum error-correction code in a nonequiprobable-error environment. We determine the optimum number of verification steps to be used in Shor-state construction and whether Shor states without verification are usable for practical quantum computation. These results are compared to the same processes of encoding and error correction where Shor states are not used. We demonstrate that the construction of logical zero states with no first-order error terms may not require the complete edifice of quantum fault tolerance. With respect to error correction, we show for a particular initial state that error correction using a single qubit for the syndrome measurement yields a similar output-state accuracy to error correction using Shor states as syndrome qubits. In addition, we demonstrate that error correction with Shor states has an inherent sensitivity to bit-flip errors. Finally, we suggest that in this type of error-correction scenario one should always repeat a syndrome measurement until attaining an all-zero readout (twice in row). © 2012 American Physical Society.


News Article | February 13, 2015
Site: arstechnica.com

In a blog post today, the Google Security team announced changes to policies on full disclosure of bugs found by Project Zero, the security research team that uncovered zero-day vulnerabilities recently revealed in Microsoft's Windows 8.1 and Apple's OS X operating systems. Those disclosures, which were made 90 days after Google alerted Microsoft and Apple in accordance with Project Zero's strict release policy, stirred controversy because they had not yet been patched—and gave attackers time to leverage them before Microsoft and Apple distributed fixes. The announcement, authored by Project Zero's Chris Evans and Ben Hawkes, Google Security's Heather Adkins, Matt Moore, and Michal Zalewski, and Google Security Vice President Gerhard Eschelbeck noted, "Disclosure deadlines have long been an industry standard practice," citing the disclosure policies of the Carnegie-Mellon CERT, Yahoo, and TippingPoint's Zero Day Initiative. Deadline policies for vendor disclosure "improve end-user security by getting security patches to users faster," the Google team stated. Project Zero set a 90-day deadline, and since Project Zero's launch, Google's team claimed, "of the 154 Project Zero bugs fixed so far, 85% were fixed within 90 days. Restrict this to the 73 issues filed and fixed after Oct 1st, 2014, and 95% were fixed within 90 days." The Microsoft and Apple bugs disclosed and other deadline misses by vendors, they noted, "were typically fixed very quickly after 90 days. Looking ahead, we’re not going to have any deadline misses for at least the rest of February." That said, Google is now adding some modifications to its 90-day hard-stop deadline. Vendors can ask for a 14-day grace period before disclosure if they are working on a fix, and deadlines that expire during weekends and holidays will be pushed to the next business day. The Project Zero team will now also ensure that bugs that go past the deadline get a Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE) identifier pre-assigned through MITRE before they are disclosed to prevent confusion. Google started Project Zero as part of an effort to help reduce the potential for targeted attacks against individuals and organizations and counter the active, well-funded research into zero-day attacks by criminal and state-sponsored organizations. When the program was announced in July of 2014, Evans wrote, "We’re not placing any particular bounds on this project and will work to improve the security of any software depended upon by large numbers of people, paying careful attention to the techniques, targets and motivations of attackers." The problem, of course, is that 90-day deadlines don't always match up with Microsoft's patching schedule, and unscheduled operating system patches can cause a great deal of disruption to organizations that need to pre-test and manage patch deployment to a large number of systems. And while Apple recently instituted automatic security updating for some critical bugs, that feature doesn't work with older operating systems, and Apple still has to package and test fixes before release. As a result, the vast majority of system patches still require some action by users or corporate IT. Adding a 14-day grace period will allow Apple and Microsoft a bit more time to smoothly roll out vulnerability fixes as part of their normal update procedure. But it still doesn't fix the bigger problem of slow response to patches by customers—and that, in part, is because of how disruptive even planned patches can be. Because patches often require system restarts and come with accompanying downtime, organizations may defer pushing patches because of the cost of rolling them out. Meanwhile, Google's Project Zero team also called on all security researchers "to adopt disclosure deadlines in some form, and feel free to use our policy verbatim if you find our data and reasoning compelling. We’re excited by the early results that disclosure deadlines are delivering—and with the help of the broader community, we can achieve even more." So stand by, security professionals—your patch schedule may get even more relentless.


BOSTON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Whitewood Encryption Systems Inc.®, a developer of next-generation entropy management systems, is pleased to introduce the Entropy Engine™, a new product that is the world’s most cost-effective, quantum-powered random number generator. The Entropy Engine addresses the fundamental issue of all cryptosystems – predictability. An overriding threat of any application that employs cryptography is the use of random data that isn’t truly random, increasing the risk that keys can be compromised and data breached. The Entropy Engine exploits quantum mechanics to supply pure entropy in the form of random data at high speeds (200 Mbps), solving the problem of entropy generation that handicaps even the highest-performance cryptography systems currently in use today. At its core is a patent-pending quantum entropy source that generates random data based on the immutable laws of physics and is therefore immune from external influence by attackers. Designed for any application that incorporates cryptography or relies on high-quality random data, the Whitewood Entropy Engine removes the risk of existing entropy sources failing to satisfy demand or becoming deterministic. Whether using low-level functions such as encryption, digital signatures, and certificates, or higher-level security protocols such as SSL/TLS or SSH, or raw random data for gaming and simulators, the Entropy Engine provides a critical security foundation and basis of trust. The product, which is delivered as a PCIe plug-in card, is being unveiled at the Black Hat USA 2015 show in Las Vegas (Aug. 1-6) for trials and evaluation, and will be available for sale at the end of the third quarter. “Whitewood’s Entropy Engine closes one of the most insidious and misunderstood vulnerabilities that exists in the world’s most widely used security systems,” said Richard Moulds, Vice President of Business Development and Strategy at Whitewood. “Whether in critical business applications, corporate networks or out on the Web, maximum security requires that we improve the quality and quantity of entropy used to generate random data. In mobile devices, browsers and sterile datacenters, access to entropy is inconsistent, notoriously hard to measure and often taken for granted. It’s time to take control of entropy and deliver the security on which we all depend. Whitewood’s quantum-powered Entropy Engine is designed to meet that need.” The technological innovation that forms the basis of Whitewood’s Entropy Engine was developed from more than two decades of research into quantum cryptography at Los Alamos National Laboratory, and was commercialized through a collaboration between the federal lab and Whitewood’s corporate parent, Allied Minds (LSE: ALM), in the largest single transaction of an intellectual property portfolio ever executed by Los Alamos. “The successful transformation of the Los Alamos technology into a commercial product illustrates how our unique public-private partnership with U.S. federal research centers allows us to create best-in-class products that solve some of our nation’s biggest economic challenges,” said John Serafini, Vice President at Allied Minds, the parent company of Whitewood. Allied Minds Federal Innovations (AMFI), the division of Allied Minds led by Serafini that is dedicated to commercializing federal intellectual property, was awarded an exclusive, worldwide license to the Los Alamos quantum cryptography innovations and collaborates with the lab under a CRADA (Cooperative Research and Development Agreement). Under this agreement Los Alamos joins a network of federal R&D entities, including The MITRE Corporation and The Aerospace Corporation, which are working with the Boston-based company to solve real-world problems and to materially benefit the U.S. economy. “We are pleased to be able to work with Allied Minds to bring proven innovations to market,” said Duncan McBranch, Chief Technology Officer of Los Alamos National Laboratory. “Secure communications on the Internet represents a serious national security challenge that impacts government, businesses and consumers alike. Los Alamos has a strong history of advances in high-performance computing and cybersecurity, and with this agreement we can assist in protecting valuable information beyond the government sector." More information on Whitewood can be found at www.whitewoodencryption.com. About Whitewood Encryption Systems, Inc. Whitewood® is addressing one of the most fundamental challenges associated with all modern cryptosystems – entropy management. Whitewood’s products exploit quantum mechanics to meet demand for high-quality entropy used for random data and key generation at scale. Building upon a base of quantum cryptography capabilities developed over the course of the past two decades at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Whitewood addresses operational vulnerabilities in any application that employs encryption, certificates and keys in clouds, devices and browsers. Whitewood is part of Allied Minds Federal Innovations, the division of Allied Minds dedicated to commercializing U.S. federal intellectual property. More information on Whitewood can be found at www.whitewoodencryption.com. About Los Alamos National Laboratory (www.lanl.gov) Los Alamos National Laboratory, a multidisciplinary research institution engaged in strategic science on behalf of national security, is operated by Los Alamos National Security, LLC, a team composed of Bechtel National, the University of California, BWX Technologies, Inc. and URS Corporation for the Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration. Los Alamos enhances national security by ensuring the safety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile, developing technologies to reduce threats from weapons of mass destruction, and solving problems related to energy, environment, infrastructure, health and global security concerns. About Allied Minds Allied Minds is an innovative U.S. science and technology development and commercialization company. Operating since 2006, Allied Minds forms, funds, manages and builds products and businesses based on innovative technologies developed at leading U.S. universities and federal research institutions. Allied Minds serves as a diversified holding company that supports its businesses and product development with capital, central management and shared services. More information about the Boston-based company can be found at www.alliedminds.com. Allied Minds Forward-Looking Statement This press release contains statements that are or may be forward-looking statements, including statements that relate to the company’s future prospects, developments and strategies. The forward-looking statements are based on current expectations and are subject to known and unknown risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results, performance and achievements to differ materially from current expectations, including, but not limited to, those risk and uncertainties described in the risk factors included in the company’s regulatory filings. These forward-looking statements are based on assumptions regarding the present and future business strategies of the company and the environment in which it will operate in the future. Each forward-looking statement speaks only as at the date of this press release. Except as required by law, regulatory requirement, the Listing Rules and the Disclosure and Transparency Rules, neither the company nor any other party intends to update or revise these forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.


News Article | July 22, 2015
Site: www.businesswire.com

WASHINGTON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Airlines for America (A4A), the industry trade organization for the leading U.S. airlines, today named Capt. John Illson as Managing Director of Safety. Illson joins A4A from the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) where he was Chief of Operational Safety. In his new role, Illson will provide strategic direction to the A4A Safety Council, and industry leadership to the Commercial Aviation Safety Team and numerous other industry safety groups. He will assist A4A members in creating and maintaining a positive safety culture and address any changing regulatory requirements in conjunction with A4A members and industry. "John's impressive experience in managing ICAO's safety initiatives as well as his work leading safety programs with other global organizations makes him a valuable addition to our Safety and Operations team," said A4A Vice President of Operations and Safety Paul McGraw. “As a pilot with years of domestic and international flight operations leadership, John understands well our industry’s commitment to safety and to improving the efficiency of the national air space for our customers. We look forward to working with him to best represent the U.S. airline industry.” "Having spent my entire career committed to aviation safety, I look forward to joining A4A and working with the member airlines and other stakeholder organizations to continue to build upon our industry’s strong safety record," said Capt. Illson. Illson begins on Sept. 8, and will report to McGraw. Prior to joining A4A, Illson was responsible for oversight of various ICAO programs dealing with flight operations, aircraft certification, airworthiness and safety management. Illson also held positions as a Project Team Manager for Operational Safety Analysis for the MITRE Corporation, as well as Assistant Safety Director for the International Air Transport Association. Capt. Illson was a Check Airman and Flight Training Manager during his 25-year career at U.S. Airways. He accumulated more than 18,000 hours total flying time while flying the Airbus 319/320/321, Boeing 737/757/767, Fokker 100, DC-9 and BAC 1-11. Illson holds a Bachelor of Science degree in public administration from Georgetown University and Master of Business Administration and Master of Public Policy and Management degrees, both from the University of Pittsburgh. Annually, commercial aviation helps drive nearly $1.5 trillion in U.S. economic activity and more than 11 million U.S. jobs. Airlines for America (A4A) vigorously advocates on behalf of the American airline industry as a model of safety, customer service and environmental responsibility and as the indispensable network that drives our nation’s economy and global competitiveness. Our member carriers and their affiliates transport more than 90 percent of all U.S. airline passenger and cargo traffic. America needs a cohesive National Airline Policy that will support the integral role the nation’s airlines play in connecting people and goods globally, spur the nation’s economic growth and create more high-paying jobs. A4A works collaboratively with the airlines, labor groups, Congress and the Administration to improve air travel for everyone. For more information about the airline industry, visit our website airlines.org and our blog, A Better Flight Plan, at airlines.org/blog. Follow us on Twitter: @airlinesdotorg. Like us on Facebook: facebook.com/AirlinesforAmerica. Join us on Instagram: instagram.com/AirlinesforAmerica. To learn how you can support a National Airline Policy, a better flight plan for everyone, visit www.nationalairlinepolicy.com.


News Article | January 4, 2013
Site: arstechnica.com

A sampling of computer security professionals at the recent Information Systems Security Association conference found that a majority of them believe there will be a "major" cyber terrorism event within the next year. The survey, conducted by the network security and hardening vendor Ixia, found that of 105 attendees surveyed, 79 percent believe that there will be some sort of large-scale attack on the information technology powering some element of the US's infrastructure—and utilities and financial institutions were the most likely targets. Fifty-nine percent of the security professionals polled believed that the US government should be responsible for protecting citizens from cyber terrorism. The survey didn't give a definition for a major cyber attack. "We left that to the security professionals to interpret for themselves," said Larry Hart, Ixia's vice president of marketing and strategy, in an interview with Ars. "The general idea of the question was 'is something big going to happen?'" Hart said that concerns over attacks like Stuxnet have increased awareness among security professionals that the tools used for cyber warfare by nation-states could be used by other parties. "There are all these new battlegrounds in information technology for people to take action against various governmental or paragovernmental organizations." As far as predicting the target of an attack, 35 percent of the security professionals polled pointed at the power grid, with 13 percent picking the oil and gas industry. Mike Hamilton, a director of systems engineering at Ixia, said that the highly interdependent nature of the three major power grids in the US makes for a "fertile field for cyber-terrorists." That sentiment is supported by the data from the Department of Homeland Security's Industrial Control Systems Cyber Emergency Response Team (ICS-CERT), which responded to 198 cyber incidents in the 2012 fiscal year, with 41 percent of the them occurring in the energy sector. In one incident, a "spear-phishing" campaign against 23 companies related to the gas pipeline industry managed to compromise the systems of two of them, attempting to collect data that would give attackers the ability to gain remote control over industrial control and SCADA systems. Another 23 percent believed that the financial industry was the most likely target for a major cyber terrorism incident, while 12 percent believed the most likely targets are water and other public utilities. Water and sewage utilities have been the target of attacks in the past; the event most frequently cited by infrastructure security experts, including Hamilton, was an incident in Maroochy, Australia in 2000—a disgruntled former contractor took remote control of the SCADA systems of Maroochy Shire's sewage treatment system, and "caused 800,000 liters of raw sewage to spill out into local parks, rivers and even the grounds of a Hyatt Regency hotel," Marshall Abrams of the MITRE Corporation and Joe Weiss of Applied Control Solutions wrote in a case study of the event for the National Institute of Standards and Technology.


News Article | September 10, 2014
Site: observer.com

When Professor David Sheffler first made a 3D-printed jet engine as a class experiment, one of the students whipped out a cell phone to record the results. That video ended up in the hands of a team at The MITRE Corporation, a research titan with military aviation contracts. When MITRE reached out to Mr. Sheffler, they wanted to know if he could 3D print a whole drone. Mr. Sheffler and his student at the University of Virginia have announced their completion of The Razor, a 3D-printed drone that looks more like a military stealth fighter than the kind of cute GoPro-laden quadcopter Martha Stewart uses to take photos of her farm. The drone uses an Android phone as a brain, is powered by a tiny jet and is “fully autonomous,” which presumably means that the drone can stay aloft for extended periods of time without a human pilot. The Razor launches by hand, and watching Mr. Sheffler repeatedly try to launch it looks like a simulation of what the Wright Brothers likely went through — a running start, a moment of flight, and a comic crash: All it takes to make one of these is a few off-the-shelf parts, a 3D printer and the Android phone, and you can make a drone that flies over 100 miles an hour. “We can […] also modify it as needed to meet various mission needs.” Mr. Sheffler told the univeristy. “A new configuration of the aircraft can be produced by this method in about a day.” Ms. Scheffler admits that making dronesthrough the good ol’ fashioned method of injection molding still turns out a more solid drone, but the Razor streamlines the process if you don’t have access to a military-grade factory production and skip — say, on the front lines of a war. But Mr. Sheffler also hopes we’ll find a use for these drones that doesn’t involve our military might. “As with any technology, there is the potential for good and harm to result,” he said. “Weapons and drones used for killing and spying are dominating the media at this time. There are many more peaceful constructive uses for the technology, the potentials of which are only just being realized.”


News Article | July 27, 2015
Site: www.businesswire.com

COLUMBIA, Md.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Corporate Office Properties Trust (COPT or the Company) (NYSE: OFC) has completed the disposition of 1550 Westbranch Drive in McLean, Virginia, for $27.75 million. The building contains approximately 152,200 rentable square feet and is 100% leased to The MITRE Corporation until October 2016. COPT is an office REIT that focuses primarily on serving the specialized requirements of U.S. Government agencies and defense contractors, most of which are engaged in defense information technology and national security-related activities. As of March 31, 2015, COPT derived 75% of its annualized revenue from its strategic tenant niche properties and 25% from its regional office properties. The Company generally acquires, develops, manages and leases office and data center properties concentrated in large office parks primarily located near knowledge-based government demand drivers and/or in targeted markets or submarkets in the Greater Washington, DC/Baltimore region. As of March 31, 2015, the Company’s consolidated portfolio consisted of 178 office properties totaling 17.7 million rentable square feet. COPT is an S&P MidCap 400 company. This press release may contain “forward-looking” statements, as defined in Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933 and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, that are based on the Company’s current expectations, estimates and projections about future events and financial trends affecting the Company. Forward-looking statements can be identified by the use of words such as “may,” “will,” “should,” “could,” “believe,” “anticipate,” “expect,” “estimate,” “plan” or other comparable terminology. Forward-looking statements are inherently subject to risks and uncertainties, many of which the Company cannot predict with accuracy and some of which the Company might not even anticipate. Accordingly, the Company can give no assurance that these expectations, estimates and projections will be achieved. Future events and actual results may differ materially from those discussed in the forward-looking statements. Important factors that may affect these expectations, estimates, and projections include, but are not limited to: The Company undertakes no obligation to update or supplement any forward-looking statements. For further information, please refer to the Company’s filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, particularly the section entitled “Risk Factors” in Item 1A of the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2014.

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