Clinton, MS, United States

Mississippi College

www.mc.edu
Clinton, MS, United States

Mississippi College is a Christian university located in Clinton, Mississippi just west of the capital city of Jackson. Founded in 1826, MC is the second-oldest Baptist-affiliated college in the United States and the oldest college in Mississippi. With more than 5,000 students, Mississippi College is the largest private university in the state. Wikipedia.


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News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The Community for Accredited Online Schools, a leading resource provider for higher education information, has ranked the best online colleges and universities in Mississippi for 2017. 11 four-year schools made the list, with University of Southern Mississippi, Mississippi State University, University of Mississippi, Jackson State University and Mississippi College taking the top five spots. Of the 11 two-year colleges who also made the list, Hinds Community College, East Mississippi Community College, Itawamba Community College, Holmes Community College and Northwest Mississippi Community College were the top five. “For students who need flexible scheduling, online certificates and degrees are a useful alternative to traditional, on-campus learning options,” said Doug Jones, CEO and founder of AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org. “These are the schools in Mississippi that are catering to students with geographical or schedule limitations by offering their high-quality degree programs online.” To earn a spot on the “Best Online Schools in Mississippi” list, colleges and universities must be accredited, public or private not-for-profit institutions. Each college is also judged based on additional data points such as the number of academic services that are available by school, student/teacher ratios, graduation rates and financial aid availability. For more details on where each school falls in the rankings and the data and methodology used to determine the lists, visit: The Best Online Four-Year Schools in Mississippi for 2017 include the following: Alcorn State University Belhaven University Blue Mountain College Delta State University Jackson State University Mississippi College Mississippi State University Mississippi University for Women University of Mississippi University of Southern Mississippi William Carey University The Best Online Two-Year Schools in Mississippi for 2017 include the following: East Mississippi Community College Hinds Community College Holmes Community College Itawamba Community College Jones County Junior College Meridian Community College Mississippi Delta Community College Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College Northwest Mississippi Community College Pearl River Community College Southwest Mississippi Community College ### About Us: AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org was founded in 2011 to provide students and parents with quality data and information about pursuing an affordable, quality education that has been certified by an accrediting agency. Our community resource materials and tools span topics such as college accreditation, financial aid, opportunities available to veterans, people with disabilities, as well as online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning programs that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational success.


News Article | May 1, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

LearnHowToBecome.org, a leading resource provider for higher education and career information, has announced its list of the best online Christian colleges in the nation for 2017. The top 50 schools were acknowledged, with Saint Mary-of-the-Woods College, Buena Vista University, Judson College, Amridge University and Chaminade University of Honolulu taking the top five spots. A full list of the winning schools is included below. “As demand for quality online education grows, religious-based schools are offering more flexible online programs than ever before,” said Wes Ricketts, senior vice president of LearnHowToBecome.org. “These schools go above and beyond with their online curriculum, offering the best combination of value and quality that translates into student success.” To be included on the “Best Online Christian Colleges” list, schools must be regionally accredited, not-for-profit and have an active Christian affiliation. Each college is also measured on such data points as the diversity of degree programs offered, academic and career counseling services, variety of student resources and post-college alumni earnings. Complete details on each college, their individual scores and the data and methodology used to determine the LearnHowToBecome.org “Best Online Christian Colleges” list, visit: The Best Online Christian Colleges in the U.S. for 2017 include: Amridge University Baker University Belhaven University Bethel University Bethesda University Briar Cliff University Buena Vista University Canisius College Carlow University Chaminade University of Honolulu Clarks Summit University Concordia University-Nebraska Concordia University-Wisconsin DeSales University Duquesne University Graceland University-Lamoni Gwynedd Mercy University Iowa Wesleyan College Judson College King University LeTourneau University Malone University Marian University McKendree University Messenger College Mississippi College Newman University Niagara University North Greenville University Ohio Christian University Oral Roberts University Ottawa University-Ottawa Presentation College Quincy University Saint Joseph's College of Maine Saint Leo University Saint Mary-of-the-Woods College Siena Heights University Southwestern Adventist University Southwestern College Spring Arbor University University of Detroit Mercy University of Saint Francis-Fort Wayne University of Saint Mary University of St. Francis University of the Cumberlands University of the Incarnate Word Viterbo University Wayland Baptist University William Woods University ### About Us: LearnHowtoBecome.org was founded in 2013 to provide data and expert driven information about employment opportunities and the education needed to land the perfect career. Our materials cover a wide range of professions, industries and degree programs, and are designed for people who want to choose, change or advance their careers. We also provide helpful resources and guides that address social issues, financial aid and other special interest in higher education. Information from LearnHowtoBecome.org has proudly been featured by more than 700 educational institutions.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

LearnHowToBecome.org, a leading resource provider for higher education and career information, has announced its ranking of the best colleges and universities in Mississippi for 2017. Of the 15 four-year schools that qualified for the list, Millsaps College, Mississippi College, University of Mississippi, Belhaven University and Mississippi State University scored as the top five schools. Of the 15 two-year schools included in the ranking, East Mississippi Community College, Northeast Mississippi Community College, East Central Community College, Itawamba Community College and Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College were the top five. A full list of schools is included below. “These Mississippi schools have a proven track record of setting up their students for post-college career success,” said Wes Ricketts, senior vice president of LearnHowToBecome.org. “Our analysis shows the value of the education each of these schools provides, with academic and employment resources for students translating to strong post-college earnings.” To be included on Mississippi’s “Best Colleges” list, schools must be regionally accredited, not-for-profit institutions. Each college is also scored on more than a dozen additional data points including diversity of program offerings, career services, educational counseling, financial aid availability, graduation rates and student/teacher ratios. Complete details on each college, their individual scores and the data and methodology used to determine the LearnHowToBecome.org “Best Colleges in Mississippi” list, visit: The Best Four-Year Colleges in Mississippi for 2017 include: Alcorn State University Belhaven University Blue Mountain College Delta State University Jackson State University Millsaps College Mississippi College Mississippi State University Mississippi University for Women Mississippi Valley State University Rust College Tougaloo College University of Mississippi University of Southern Mississippi William Carey University The Best Two-Year Colleges in Mississippi for 2017 include: Coahoma Community College Copiah-Lincoln Community College East Central Community College East Mississippi Community College Hinds Community College Holmes Community College Itawamba Community College Jones County Junior College Meridian Community College Mississippi Delta Community College Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College Northeast Mississippi Community College Northwest Mississippi Community College Pearl River Community College Southwest Mississippi Community College ### About Us: LearnHowtoBecome.org was founded in 2013 to provide data and expert driven information about employment opportunities and the education needed to land the perfect career. Our materials cover a wide range of professions, industries and degree programs, and are designed for people who want to choose, change or advance their careers. We also provide helpful resources and guides that address social issues, financial aid and other special interest in higher education. Information from LearnHowtoBecome.org has proudly been featured by more than 700 educational institutions.


Saxton Law, PLLC attorney Randall R. Saxton has been appointed by Executive Director Lee Smithson and confirmed by the Attorney General of Mississippi as Attorney for the Mississippi Emergency Management Agency. MEMA coordinates activities that will save lives, protect property, and reduce suffering of Mississippi’s citizens and their communities impacted by disasters through a comprehensive and integrated program of disaster preparedness, response, recovery, and mitigation initiatives. Director Smithson’s commitment is to make MEMA the most technologically advanced emergency management agency in the country. By leveraging technology, the goal is to save taxpayer dollars and increase efficiency in all of the Agency’s functions. His motto of “Preparing for Tomorrow’s Disasters Today” is the driving force behind working to protect all 2.9 million Mississippians. MEMA is funded by the state and also receives funding from the Federal Emergency Management Agency through grants such as Emergency Management Performance Grants and Hazard Mitigation Grant Program. With these funds, MEMA provides financial support to local communities for recovery operations such as public assistance reimbursement for eligible programs and coordinating the state’s response to any type of natural or man-made emergency through the State Emergency Operations Center. Mr. Saxton founded Saxton Law, PLLC in 2013 and focuses his practice on bankruptcy, IRS tax installment agreements, business formation, and estate planning, including wills. He also serves as the JAG officer for the Mississippi State Guard and is on the Board of Directors of the Madison Chamber of Commerce. He is the Chairman of the Jackson Young Lawyers Association’s standing committee for mediation and is a member of the American Bar Association Young Lawyers Division Committee on Bankruptcy. Saxton was selected by the Mississippi Business Journal as one of the state's Top 50 Business Leaders Under 40 and has been named by Portico magazine as one of the “Portico 10.” He has been rated in Martindale Hubbell’s Judicial Edition as “AV Preeminent” since 2016 and has also been named a Rising Star in Mid-South Super Lawyers®. Saxton completed his undergraduate and graduate degrees at Mississippi College, and he received his Doctor of Jurisprudence at Mississippi College School of Law.


News Article | May 6, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

Appearing on “Morning Joe” on Friday morning, Representative Steve Scalise of Louisiana didn’t flinch when host Willie Geist asked him a direct question about what would happen if the American Health Care Act—which the House narrowly approved a day earlier—became law. “So everyone with a pre-existing condition right now who is covered under Obamacare will continue to have coverage?” he asked the congressman, who as House majority whip is the third-ranking Republican in the chamber. From off camera, Mika Brzezinski let out a sound that was somewhere between a groan and a gasp. In the interest of reassuring the public about the GOP’s plan, Scalise had made the kind of blanket commitment that could come back to haunt the party in the future. While Republican leaders were careful to maintain the federal requirement under Obamacare that insurers offer coverage to anyone, including those with pre-existing conditions, their bill would allow states to wriggle out of the mandate that insurers charge those customers the same price. As a result, people with pre-existing conditions could find insurance unaffordable in states that get a waiver to opt out of the federal law. Recommended: Seven Reasons the Left Is Losing Did Republicans learn nothing in the last eight years? From making unrealistic promises to cutting back-room deals, Republicans are ignoring many of the lessons they should have taken from the Democrats’ experience selling a complicated health-care plan to the public. “If you like your plan, you can keep your plan.” That one concrete pledge repeated dozens of times by former President Barack Obama—and many other Democrats at the time—became an albatross for his party once the Affordable Care Act took effect in 2013. They had made the commitment to try to sell the public on the plan and get it passed initially, having seen how the fear of change illustrated in ads by the fictional couple “Harry and Louise” torpedoed the Clinton health-care bill 20 years earlier. But although Obamacare did not directly force people off their insurance, many had to change their plans because insurers stopped selling due to the new coverage requirements under the law. That broken promise helped the GOP expand its House majority and retake the Senate in the 2014 elections. Republicans, however, have ignored that lesson repeatedly in 2017, making all kinds of assurances about their health-care bill that will be all but impossible to keep. Most egregiously, President Trump told The Washington Post in January that his Obamacare replacement plan would provide “insurance for everybody.” In fact, Republicans made no attempt at universal coverage; their bill cuts Medicaid deeply, and the Congressional Budget Office projected that it would result in 24 million fewer people having insurance after a decade. In recent days, House Republicans like Scalise have made claims about people with pre-existing conditions that are unlikely to stand up over time. Like Democrats before them, GOP lawmakers may genuinely want their assurances to bear out, but they are putting themselves at political risk by not being forthright about the tradeoffs involved in health policy and the potential consequences of a sweeping new law. If the American Health Care Act never gets enacted, it’ll be a moot point. But if it does, Republicans better watch out. Recommended: How The Gospel of Prosperity Explains the American Health Care Act Or at least don’t admit publicly that you didn’t. After Democrats enacted the Affordable Care Act in 2010, Republicans succeeded in making a couple of key quotes infamous as they rallied opposition to the law. Then-House Speaker Nancy Pelosi uttered one of them just two weeks before final passage: “We have to pass the bill,” she said during a speech, “so that you can find out what’s in it.” No matter the context, the comment perfectly encapsulated the GOP’s criticism of the bill—that at nearly 1,000 pages, it was too long for members of Congress to read and understand, much less the general public, and that Democrats were intent on jamming it into law before people found out what it would actually do. (Just watch then-House Minority Leader John Boehner make the case right before the final vote.) Republicans did take heed of Obamacare’s length when they wrote its replacement. As Sean Spicer passionately demonstrated, the American Health Care Act is just 124 pages, and even after the amendments Republicans added, it comes in at less than 200 as passed by the House. But even that was too long for some GOP lawmakers. “I fully admit, Wolf, I did not,” Representative Chris Collins of New York told CNN’s Wolf Blitzer when he was asked if he had read the complete and final text of the AHCA. Two other Republicans admitted as much to CNN, although they noted that their staff read the bill and briefed them on its content. The lawmakers have a point when they say they rely on policy experts on their staff to fully read and summarize to them the legislative text of legislation, particularly when it comes to massive spending bills that the House and Senate vote on just days after they are unveiled. But it seems that Collins’s team didn’t even fully explain the impact of the GOP health-care bill to him. As the Buffalo News reported, the congressman was unfamiliar with a provision that could decimate a state health plan that serves 635,000 New Yorkers. Unlike staff, it’s the members of Congress themselves who are elected by the public and accountable to their constituents, and it’s not too much to ask that they personally read bills that could affect health care for the entire country. Failure to do so just feeds the perception that Republicans rushed the AHCA to passage without sufficient scrutiny, especially after the House adopted late changes that had only been public for a few hours before the vote and after the GOP spent years accusing Democrats of doing the same thing. Democrats relied on these side agreements benefitting individual states to secure the 60 votes needed to pass the Senate’s version of Obamacare in late 2009. The additional Medicaid money for Nebraska wasn’t even included in the final bill, but the back-room deals helped sour the public on the new law. Republicans seized on them to argue that Democrats were buying off senators in secret, undermining a bill that actually went through months of public scrutiny and debate. Eight years later, the GOP resorted to the same kind of tactic in the “Buffalo Bribe” (or, if you prefer, the “Tammany Haul”)—a provision the House leadership added to the AHCA at the urging of five members of the New York delegation that would shift the Medicaid tax burden away from upstate counties. But there’s a reason this kind of horse-trading is a time-honored, if unsavory, part of legislative politics: It helps to win votes, and members of Congress have a legitimate responsibility to look out for their constituents. The New York lawmakers publicized their victory, so it wasn’t a secret, but the provision’s inclusion after Republicans reported their bill out of committee underscored the legislation’s relative lack of public hearings or lengthy formal debate. Just Stay Away From Health Care Entirely (Or Don’t Tackle It Alone) Maybe Republicans were doomed from the start. “The mover on health care loses; to do something is to lose,” the always-blunt Democratic strategist James Carville reportedly told party donors earlier this year. Twice now, Democrats have lost their House majority in the next election after pursuing a major overhaul of the health insurance system. With their vote on Thursday, Republicans could be at the same risk next year. As the president recently discovered, health care is incredibly complicated. But more than that, it is intensely personal. The tradeoffs between cost and coverage will always cause controversy. The economics of private insurance necessarily require younger, healthier people to subsidize the care of those who are older and needier. And changes in policies will almost always mean some will pay more so others can pay less. Republicans may be missing a lesson the Democrats learned in another way. The party that controls government might not be able to avoid touching health-care policy entire, but it doesn’t have to do so alone. Bipartisanship doesn’t guarantee a better result, and it can’t happen if both parties don’t agree to cooperate. But like insurance itself, it’s at least a way to share the risk. Read more from The Atlantic: How Two Mississippi College Students Fell in Love and Decided to Join a Terrorist Group This Is What's in the Obamacare Replacement Bill Passed by the House This article was originally published on The Atlantic.


News Article | November 23, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Leading higher education information and resource provider AffordableCollegesOnline.org has released its list of the 2016-2017 Best Online Counseling Degree Programs in the nation. A total of 34 schools across the U.S. made the list, which was determined by comparing a variety of value-based statistics and educational outcome data from each school. Top finishers include the University of Texas of the Permian Basin, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Amridge University, University of Cincinnati and the University of Alabama. "With many opportunities to specialize and grow a meaningful career, counseling is a niche field these schools are making an extra effort to maximize student success in,” said Dan Schuessler, CEO and Founder of AffordableCollegesOnline.org. "From financial aid to placement services and overall affordability, these schools are providing the best overall combination of value and quality for counseling students in the nation.” To qualify for a spot on the AffordableCollegesOnline.org’s rankings schools must meet several basic requirements. Colleges must be institutionally accredited, public or private not-for-profit institution. Two-year schools must offer tuition under $5,000 per year for in-state students, while four-year schools must offer tuition under $25,000 per year for in-state students. From there, the site analyzes and compares a variety of qualitative and quantitative data points, tuition costs and more to come up with final scores and ranks for each school. An alphabetical listing of schools on the 2016-2017 Best Online Counseling Degree Programs list can be found below. For more details on data and methodology used to score each, visit: The Best Online Counseling Degree Programs in the U.S. for 2016-2017: Amridge University Bellevue University Brescia University California State University - East Bay Colorado State University - Fort Collins Crown College Indiana Wesleyan University Mercy College Mid-Atlantic Christian University Mississippi College Missouri State University - Springfield National University North Dakota State University - Main Campus Northwestern State University of Louisiana Ohio Christian University Oral Roberts University Oregon State University Pacific Oaks College Pennsylvania State University - Main Campus Spring Arbor University The University of Alabama The University of Texas of the Permian Basin Thomas University Union Institute & University University of Alaska Fairbanks University of Arizona University of Cincinnati - Main Campus University of Houston-Victoria University of Maine at Augusta University of North Dakota University of Wisconsin - Stout Utah State University Viterbo University Western New Mexico University AffordableCollegesOnline.org began in 2011 to provide quality data and information about pursuing an affordable higher education. Our free community resource materials and tools span topics such as financial aid and college savings, opportunities for veterans and people with disabilities, and online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning environments that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational and career success. We have been featured by nearly 1,100 postsecondary institutions and nearly 120 government organizations.

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