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Gujō, Japan

Nomura K.-I.,Japan National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology | Ushijima H.,Japan National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology | Nagase K.,Mino Group Co. | Ikedo H.,Mino Group Co. | And 4 more authors.
2014 International Conference on Electronics Packaging, ICEP 2014 | Year: 2014

We developed a new printing method called "screen-offset printing." This method is the combination of screen printing and transfer printing techniques; ink is first screen-printed on a silicone blanket, and the ink is then transferred from the blanket onto a substrate. Such a procedure allows the formation of patterns with highly rectangular cross sections and finer patterns than can be achieved by conventional screen printing. In the present paper, we explain the details of this process and analyze its efficacy by comparing the experimental results of screen-offset printing with those of conventional screen printing. Further, we introduce a currently developing automated screen-offset printing machine and demonstrate the formation of fine patterns 20 μm in width. Source


Nomura K.-I.,Japan National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology | Ushijima H.,Japan National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology | Nagase K.,Mino Group Co. | Ikedo H.,Mino Group Co. | And 7 more authors.
Japanese Journal of Applied Physics | Year: 2016

Additive-type printing techniques such as gravure-offset printing and screen printing are effective for low-cost and ecofriendly electrode pattern formation. Gravure-offset printing is effective for fine pattern formation with widths on the order of 10-20 ?m, whereas screen printing is effective for the formation of large-area patterns. However, it is difficult to simultaneously form fine and large-area patterns using these printing techniques. In this study, we demonstrate that fine (minimum width of 15 ?m) and medium-as well as large-area patterns can be formed simultaneously using our developed screen-offset printing technique, which is a combination of screen printing on a silicone blanket and transfer printing from the blanket to a substrate. Furthermore, we demonstrate the application of our method to printing on adhesive materials, which allows electrode formation without applying heat to the film substrate. © 2016 The Japan Society of Applied Physics. Source


Nomura K.-I.,Japan National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology | Kusaka Y.,Japan National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology | Ushijima H.,Japan National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology | Nagase K.,Mino Group Co. | And 5 more authors.
Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering | Year: 2014

Screen-offset printing combines screen-printing on a silicone blanket with transference of the print from the blanket to a substrate. The blanket absorbs organic solvents in the ink, and therefore, the ink does not disperse through the material. This prevents blurring and allows fine patterns with widths of a few tens of micrometres to be produced. However, continuous printing deteriorates the pattern's shape, which may be a result of decay in the absorption abilities of the blanket. Thus, we have developed a new technique for refreshing the blanket by substituting high-boiling-point solvents present on the blanket surface with low-boiling-point solvents. We analyse the efficacy of this technique, and demonstrate continuous fine pattern formation for 100 screen-offset printing processes. © 2014 IOP Publishing Ltd. Source


Tanabe A.,Tohoku University | Uehara T.,Tohoku University | Nagase K.,Mino Group Co. | Ikedo H.,Mino Group Co. | And 3 more authors.
Japanese Journal of Applied Physics | Year: 2016

We demonstrated a coating method of screen printing for discharging droplets of a high-viscosity resin on a substrate for ultraviolet (UV) nanoimprint lithography (NIL). Compared with a spin-coated resin film on a silicon substrate, discharged resin droplets on a silicon substrate were effective in terms of the uniformity of residual layer thickness (RLT) in contact with a mold with various pattern densities. Fluorescence microscope observations with a fluorescent-dye-containing UV-curable resin enabled the evaluation of the shapes of resin droplets discharged on a substrate surface. Widely used screen mesh plates composed of a stainless mesh covered with a patterned emulsion film caused defects of undischarged parts, whereas defects-free resin droplets with a narrow size distribution were discharged by mesh-free plates prepared with laser ablation. The pitch-to-diameter ratio in the configuration of 10-m-diameter holes needs to be larger than 2.5 times for printing a resin having a viscosity of 12,800mPas. © 2016 The Japan Society of Applied Physics. Source


Nomura K.-I.,Japan National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology | Kusaka Y.,Japan National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology | Ushijima H.,Japan National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology | Nagase K.,Mino Group Co. | Ikedo H.,Mino Group Co.
Microsystem Technologies | Year: 2016

Pad printing is a simple but effective method for fabricating electrodes onto complex curved surfaces. In this method, ink is picked up from the gravure plate by the soft pad, after which the ink pattern is transcriptionally formed from the pad to the final substrate. However, this printing method has some problems; primarily, it is difficult to form thick and large patterns. To address these limitations, we developed a new printing technique called “screen-pad printing.” In this technique, ink is first screen-printed onto a blanket made of silicone resin, after which the ink pattern is picked up by the soft pad, and the pattern on the pad is transferred to the substrate. In this paper, we describe the features of the developed screen-pad printing technique when forming patterns on objects that have complex surfaces. Further, the impact of our new method is analyzed by comparing the experimental results of screen-pad printing with results obtained from conventional pad printing. © 2014, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Source

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