Kampala, Uganda
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Roncoli C.,University of Georgia | Orlove B.S.,University of California at Davis | Kabugo M.R.,Makerere University | Waiswa M.M.,Ministry of Water
Agriculture and Human Values | Year: 2011

Climate change is confronting African farmers with growing uncertainties. Advances in seasonal climate predictions offer potential for assisting farmers in dealing with climate risk. Experimental cases of forecast dissemination to African rural communities suggest that participatory approaches can facilitate understanding and use of uncertain climate information. But few of these studies integrate critical reflections on participation that have emerged in the last decade which reveal how participatory approaches can miss social dynamics of power at the community level and in the broader context. Furthermore, neither climate application research nor theoretical critiques of participation fully examine the culturally constructed nature of participation. Drawing on sociolinguistic analysis, in-depth interviews, and ethnographic observation, this paper examines how Ugandan farmers engage in participation in the context of discussions of seasonal climate forecasts. Forecasts were presented to farmers groups whose members were then asked to discuss the forecast among themselves. In doing so, groups sought to develop a common understanding of the forecast and consensual plans for response strategies. Focusing on one particular group meeting as an example, we show how different cultural styles of participation affect the interpretation of the forecast and the formulation of response strategies. Group interaction is shown to be mostly structured around two styles of participation. On the one hand, there is the "Western" style advocated by NGOs and the government, which centers on ensuring that all individuals who are present have opportunities to speak during discussion and to vote on group decisions. On the other hand, a "Kiganda" style of participation emphasizes the importance of affirming ties to a collectivity, respect for social hierarchy, deployment of good manners, and consensus building. The case study illuminates how the performance of different styles of participation is grounded in localized frameworks of language and culture but also draw on political and policy discourses at the national level. Although a cultural high value on consensus may work in favor of prominent members, the availability of multiple styles of participation also enables group members to exercise their agency in positive ways. Attention to the interplay of different styles of participation throws light on the subtle social processes that shape how knowledge is assessed, which sources are trusted, which and whose interpretations prevail, what options are deemed viable, how costs and benefits are calculated, and whose resources are mobilized in the effort to reduce vulnerability to climate risk. These are key questions for an assessment of the role of boundary organizations, such as farmer associations, in the communication and application of climate forecasts in agriculture. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.


Receive press releases from Magenta Global Pte Ltd: By Email Africa Rural Electrification to Power-Up This Month at 3rd Africa Mini Grids Summit 2016 in Dar es Salaam The 3rd Africa Mini Grids Summit 2016 will convene this month on November 28-29 in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, November 10, 2016 --( Mini grids have been identified as a key platform to address critical electrification shortages in Africa. Creating successful mini grid ecosystems beyond pilot projects are now the focus of African governments facing severe shortages especially for their off-grid populations. Foundations, donors and organizations are stepping up their financial support for mini grids, e.g. in Tanzania alone the World Bank is setting the pace with a $209 million financing for a six-year Rural Electrification Expansion Programme. Africa can lead the way with plentiful renewable resources, an increasingly tech savvy populations encouraged by the mobile phones technology leap, presence of world class telcos and less incumbent infrastructure to obstruct new models. Regional energy authorities leading the discussions at this 2016 Summit include the Rural Electrification Authorities/Agencies (REAs) of Tanzania, Kenya, Uganda and Zambia along with the Ministry of Water, Irrigation & Energy, Ethiopia. Among the distinguished experts providing new knowledge and insights are: Prof Abubakr S Bahaj, Professor of Sustainable Energy and Head of Energy & Climate Change Division, University of Southampton, UK, and Chief Scientific Adviser, Southampton City, UK; and Helvi Ileka, Project Officer at the Namibia Energy Institute, Namibia University of Science & Technology. Private sector stakeholders who will share their expertise and practical applications at the 2016 Conference include: Matthias Hermes, Director of European Sales, Aquion Energy, USA; Daniel Becker, CEO, Rafiki Power, Germany / E.ON Off Grid Solutions, Tanzania; Sam Slaughter, Managing Director, PowerGen Renewable Energy, Kenya; and Dr Michael H Gera, Managing Partner, Energy Access Ventures, France. Showcasing their latest technologies at the event are exhibitors: Aquion Energy, USA, Rafiki Power, Germany / E.ON Off Grid Solutions, Tanzania, and Fluidic Energy, USA. The CEO of the conference-organizing company, Magenta Global, Singapore, Maggie Tan, added, “Improving electrification in rural Africa is a paramount priority for most of the Governments in Africa. With less than 15% of rural households in Sub-Saharan Africa (excluding South Africa) having access to electricity, strategies for creating commercially-viable small power producers and mini grids in rural areas, businesses and public institutions are critically needed. The time is right and the technology is available to create economically and financially sustainable mini grids to power communities and businesses.” Ms Tan encouraged all companies and organizations to contribute to the development of this renewable energy sector by being part of this key event. The 3rd Africa Mini Grids Summit 2016 is held in collaboration with Knowledge Partner Energy for Development (e4D) Network / University of Southampton and supported by: the Alliance for Rural Electrification (ARE), the African Network for Solar Energy (ANSOLE), and the South African Alternative Energy Association (SAAEA). The two-day event will be held at the Serena Hotel in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, November 10, 2016 --( PR.com )-- The 3rd Africa Mini Grids Summit 2016 will convene this month on November 28-29 in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. This third edition of the Africa-wide conference will once again gather key decision and policy makers along with the power players in the mini grids sector to share their invaluable expertise and experience in providing for the continent's rapidly-increasing power requirements.Mini grids have been identified as a key platform to address critical electrification shortages in Africa. Creating successful mini grid ecosystems beyond pilot projects are now the focus of African governments facing severe shortages especially for their off-grid populations. Foundations, donors and organizations are stepping up their financial support for mini grids, e.g. in Tanzania alone the World Bank is setting the pace with a $209 million financing for a six-year Rural Electrification Expansion Programme. Africa can lead the way with plentiful renewable resources, an increasingly tech savvy populations encouraged by the mobile phones technology leap, presence of world class telcos and less incumbent infrastructure to obstruct new models.Regional energy authorities leading the discussions at this 2016 Summit include the Rural Electrification Authorities/Agencies (REAs) of Tanzania, Kenya, Uganda and Zambia along with the Ministry of Water, Irrigation & Energy, Ethiopia.Among the distinguished experts providing new knowledge and insights are: Prof Abubakr S Bahaj, Professor of Sustainable Energy and Head of Energy & Climate Change Division, University of Southampton, UK, and Chief Scientific Adviser, Southampton City, UK; and Helvi Ileka, Project Officer at the Namibia Energy Institute, Namibia University of Science & Technology.Private sector stakeholders who will share their expertise and practical applications at the 2016 Conference include: Matthias Hermes, Director of European Sales, Aquion Energy, USA; Daniel Becker, CEO, Rafiki Power, Germany / E.ON Off Grid Solutions, Tanzania; Sam Slaughter, Managing Director, PowerGen Renewable Energy, Kenya; and Dr Michael H Gera, Managing Partner, Energy Access Ventures, France.Showcasing their latest technologies at the event are exhibitors: Aquion Energy, USA, Rafiki Power, Germany / E.ON Off Grid Solutions, Tanzania, and Fluidic Energy, USA.The CEO of the conference-organizing company, Magenta Global, Singapore, Maggie Tan, added, “Improving electrification in rural Africa is a paramount priority for most of the Governments in Africa. With less than 15% of rural households in Sub-Saharan Africa (excluding South Africa) having access to electricity, strategies for creating commercially-viable small power producers and mini grids in rural areas, businesses and public institutions are critically needed. The time is right and the technology is available to create economically and financially sustainable mini grids to power communities and businesses.” Ms Tan encouraged all companies and organizations to contribute to the development of this renewable energy sector by being part of this key event.The 3rd Africa Mini Grids Summit 2016 is held in collaboration with Knowledge Partner Energy for Development (e4D) Network / University of Southampton and supported by: the Alliance for Rural Electrification (ARE), the African Network for Solar Energy (ANSOLE), and the South African Alternative Energy Association (SAAEA).The two-day event will be held at the Serena Hotel in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from Magenta Global Pte Ltd


News Article | September 30, 2016
Site: www.rechargenews.com

The East African nation’s government currently owns all of the country’s 324MW of installed wind capacity, including the 153MW Adama 2 project, which was recently completed by developer HydroChina International Engineeering. However, the May launch of Ethiopia’s first tenders for 1.2GW of planned wind capacity, on top of ongoing power sector reforms, could open the door to independent power producer (IPP) involvement, said Deo Onyango, regional executive of Sub-Saharan Africa for GE Renewable Energy. A template for IPP power-purchase agreements was established by Ethiopian Electric Power last year, when it agreed to buy up to 500MW of electricity from the foreign-owned Corbetti geothermal project in central Ethiopia. The US government is also advising Addis Ababa on IPP frameworks through its Power Africa programme, Onyango points out. The Ethiopian government — which aims to bring roughly 3GW of new wind projects on line by 2037 — is said to have become more open to private investment in its power sector as it is unable to  take on more debt to build generating capacity. A number of challenges — including grid and transmission constraints, as well as limited access to financing — mean that the path to private ownership of Ethiopian wind assets is still far from assured. Nonetheless, Onyango says the Ministry of Water, Irrigation and Electricity’s first round of tenders for 550MW of wind capacity in May represents a major shift. “Bringing in IPPs is huge,” agrees Steve Sawyer, secretary general of the Global Wind Energy Council (GWEC). “It could transform international investors’ attitude to the whole of East Africa, if it actually happens.”


Mankiewicz-Boczek J.,University of Lodz | Gagala I.,University of Lodz | Jurczak T.,University of Lodz | Urbaniak M.,University of Lodz | And 2 more authors.
African Journal of Ecology | Year: 2014

The occurrence of toxic cyanobacterial blooms is a serious problem for fast-developing countries in Africa, such as Ethiopia, that are struggling with significant degradation of the natural environment and limited access to water of good quality. Research undertaken on Lake Tana in Ethiopia between 2009 and 2011 was intended to assess the seasonal threat from cyanobacteria and to select methods for tracking of this threat in the future. The cyanobacterial genus Microcystis was found to be present throughout the monitoring period, and M. aeruginosa was determined as the dominant species. Moreover, in all samples, toxigenic cyanobacteria with the potential to produce microcystins were detected. High levels of microcystins, ranging from 0.58 to 2.65 μg L-1, were detected each November, which indicates that in the postrainy season, water usage should be limited. The correlation between concentrations of chlorophyll-a and microcystins suggested that chlorophyll-a could be used as an indicator of the potential presence of cyanobacterial-derived hepatotoxins in Lake Tana in the future. Furthermore, for quick quantitative confirmation of the presence of microcystins, a simple and rapid ELISA test was recommended. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.


Van Leeuwen C.J.,KWR Watercycle Research Institute | Chandy P.C.,Ministry of Water
Water Science and Technology: Water Supply | Year: 2013

A set of indicators, i.e. The city blueprint, has been developed to assess the sustainability of the water cycle (SWC). The city blueprint comprises a set of 24 dedicated indicators divided over eight categories, i.e. water security, water quality, drinking water, sanitation, infrastructure, climate robustness, biodiversity and attractiveness and governance including public participation. The city blueprint can be used as a first step or quick-scan to benchmark the SWC in cities and may help: (1) to communicate a city's SWC performance and exchange experiences, (2) to select appropriate water supply and sanitation strategies, (3) to develop technological and non-technological options as future alternatives for the water cycle, where several possible changes in the use of technology, space and socio-economic scenarios can be introduced. This should finally lead to: (4) a selection of measures, including an evaluation of their costs and benefits under different development scenarios, and how to integrate these in long-term planning on urban investments. So far, a city blueprint has been made for the city of Rotterdam. This study reports on three other cities, i.e. two Dutch cities (Maastricht and Venlo) and one city in a developing country (Dar es Salaam in Tanzania). Experiences so far and further plans will be discussed. © IWA Publishing 2013.


Mankiewicz-Boczek J.,University of Lodz | Gagala I.,University of Lodz | Jurczak T.,University of Lodz | Urbaniak M.,University of Lodz | And 2 more authors.
African Journal of Ecology | Year: 2015

The occurrence of toxic cyanobacterial blooms is a serious problem for fast-developing countries in Africa, such as Ethiopia, that are struggling with significant degradation of the natural environment and limited access to water of good quality. Research undertaken on Lake Tana in Ethiopia between 2009 and 2011 was intended to assess the seasonal threat from cyanobacteria and to select methods for tracking of this threat in the future. The cyanobacterial genus Microcystis was found to be present throughout the monitoring period, and M. aeruginosa was determined as the dominant species. Moreover, in all samples, toxigenic cyanobacteria with the potential to produce microcystins were detected. High levels of microcystins, ranging from 0.58 to 2.65 μg L-1, were detected each November, which indicates that in the postrainy season, water usage should be limited. The correlation between concentrations of chlorophyll-a and microcystins suggested that chlorophyll-a could be used as an indicator of the potential presence of cyanobacterial-derived hepatotoxins in Lake Tana in the future. Furthermore, for quick quantitative confirmation of the presence of microcystins, a simple and rapid ELISA test was recommended. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

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