Toronto, Canada

The Ministry of Transportation of Ontario is the provincial ministry of the government of Ontario which is responsible for transport infrastructure and related law in Ontario. The ministry traces its roots back over a century to the 1890s, when the province began training Provincial Road Building Instructors. In 1916, the Department of Highways was formed and tasked with establishing a network of provincial highways. The first was designated on 1918, and by the summer of 1925, sixteen highways were numbered. In the mid-1920s, a new Department of Northern Development was created to manage infrastructure improvements in northern Ontario; it merged with the DOH on April 1, 1937. In 1972, the Department of Highways was reorganized as the Ministry of Transportation and Communications , which then became the Ministry of Transportation in 1987.The ministry is in charge of various aspects of transportation in Ontario, including the establishment and maintenance of the provincial highway system, the licencing and training of vehicles and drivers, and the policing of provincial roads, enforced by the Ontario Provincial Police.The MTO is responsible for:10.4 million registered vehicles8.5 million drivers55 driver examination centres & 37 travel points DES, as DriveTest Centres)281 privately owned Driver and Vehicle Licence Issuing Offices across the provinceGO Transit16525 kilometres of provincial highwayServiceOntario kiosks Wikipedia.


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News Article | December 23, 2016
Site: www.greencarcongress.com

« DOE awards $18M to 5 projects to accelerate development of plug-in electric vehicles & use of other alternative fuels | Main | DOE to award $15M to accelerate deployment of efficient transportation technology » Researchers from the University of Waterloo Center for Automotive Research (WatCAR) in Canada are modifying a Lincoln MKZ Hybrid to autonomous drive-by-wire operation. The research platform, dubbed “Autonomoose” is equipped with a full suite of radar, sonar, lidar, inertial and vision sensors; NVIDIA DRIVE PX 2 AI platform (earlier post) to run a complete autonomous driving system, integrating sensor fusion, path planning, and motion control software; and a custom autonomy software stack being developed at Waterloo as part of the research. Recently, the Autonomoose autonomously drove a crew of Ontario Ministry of Transportation officials to the podium of a launch event to introduce the first car approved to hit the roads under the province’s automated vehicle pilot program. Operating at 24 trillion deep learning operations per second, DRIVE PX 2 enables Autonomoose to navigate Ontario’s city streets and highways, even in inclement weather. The WatCAR research team has Autonomoose operating at level 2 autonomy, where the driver must be prepared to take over from the system in the event it fails to respond to a situation properly. Over the duration of the research program, they will advance the automation through level 3—where drivers can turn their attention away in certain environments, such as freeways—and ultimately reach level 4, where the automated system can control the car under most all circumstances. Ontario is the first province in Canada to create a pilot program to test automated vehicles on its roads. WatCAR was the first applicant and the first approved participant to test a vehicle on public roads. Public road testing of Autonomoose in both ideal and adverse weather conditions will begin early next year. The province places no restriction on where these test vehicles can be driven—an advantage compared to most programs around the world, which restrict driving to certain areas of cities or highways. Canada’s Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) provided initial research funding for Autonomoose. Nine professors are involved from the Faculty of Engineering and Faculty of Mathematics. Specific projects include:


A partner for major OEM brands for automotive parts, Holman Parts Distribution joins several organizations as recently accredited fleets. Princeton, NJ, November 25, 2016 --( These fleets have successfully demonstrated that a credible sustainability plan is in place, and real, meaningful progress is being made toward reducing their total emissions and the negative environmental impact via extraneous carbon fuel usage. Holman Parts Distribution joins an ever-growing list of NAFA-accredited fleets that are bringing positive action and quantifiable value to their organizations. “Being a prominent member of the automotive services community, Holman Parts Distribution sets a bold example that many more fleets can follow. Their successful demonstration of applied sustainability practices affirms the importance of such practices, and fleets who take these steps will be honored and recognized further for their leadership,” said NAFA Chief Executive Officer Phillip E, Russo, CAE. “NAFA expects that with the Sustainable Fleet Accreditation Program’s easy enrollment process, many more fleets will soon join them, bringing true and quantifiable sustainability improvements to their organizations.” Established in 1946, Holman Parts Distribution, Inc. has been a select partner for major OEM brands for automotive powertrain sales, distribution, and core collection. Holman Parts Distribution is a division of the prestigious Holman Automotive Group, a worldwide leader in the automobile business. NAFA’s Sustainable Fleet Accreditation Program includes tools and metrics to concretely measure (and score) fleet progress in emissions reduction, fuel consumption, and increases in fuel efficiency. NAFA’s roster of accredited fleets also includes: Chesterfield County Government, Fleet Services; City of Anaheim, California; City of Austin, Texas; City of Boston, Central Fleet Management; City of Chesapeake, Central Fleet Management; City of Minneapolis, Fleet Services Division; City of Sacramento, Fleet Management Division; County of Sonoma, Fleet Operations; University of Minnesota; Minnesota Department of Transportation; Minnesota Department of Natural Resources; County of Ventura; Dakota County; Eugene Water and Electric Board; Fleet and Surplus Services-MN; Florida Power & Light; Kent Fire Department RFA; Ontario Ministry of Transportation, Fleet Management Centre; Port Authority of New York and New Jersey; Time Warner Cable; Town of Greenwich, Connecticut; University of California, Davis; University of Illinois, Facilities & Services; and Yale University. To find out more about the program or how to enroll, visit www.NAFASustainable.org. About NAFA’s Sustainable Fleet Accreditation Program NAFA’s Sustainable Fleet Accreditation Program provides fleets with a single, standard way to assess their real actions and progress on sustainability by recognizing concrete improvements in air quality through reducing emissions, increasing fuel efficiency, and reducing fuel use. NAFA’s Sustainable Fleet Accreditation directly complements the DOE National Fleet Partnership program, the EPA SmartWay program, and other federal efforts, by recognizing fleets for real results achieved in their sustainability efforts. About NAFA Fleet Management Association NAFA is the association for professionals who manage fleets of sedans, public safety vehicles, trucks, and buses of all types and sizes, and a wide range of military and off-road equipment for organizations in North America and across the globe. NAFA’s members are responsible for the specification, acquisition, maintenance, repair, fueling, risk management, and remarketing of more than 4.6 million vehicles that drive an estimated 50 billion miles each year. NAFA’s members control assets and services well in excess of $100 billion each year. NAFA’s members manage fleets for corporations covering a wide range of manufacturing and service organizations, governments (whether local, state and/or federal), and public service entities (public safety, law enforcement, educational institutions, utilities, etc.); still other members serve financial institutions, insurance companies, non-profit organizations, and the like. For more information, please visit http://www.nafa.org. Princeton, NJ, November 25, 2016 --( PR.com )-- NAFA Fleet Management Association (NAFA) is pleased to announce its next accredited fleet via NAFA’s Sustainable Fleet Accreditation Program is the fleet of Holman Parts Distribution. They join the University of Minnesota; the fleet for the Town of Greenwich, CT; and the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources as recently accredited fleets.These fleets have successfully demonstrated that a credible sustainability plan is in place, and real, meaningful progress is being made toward reducing their total emissions and the negative environmental impact via extraneous carbon fuel usage. Holman Parts Distribution joins an ever-growing list of NAFA-accredited fleets that are bringing positive action and quantifiable value to their organizations.“Being a prominent member of the automotive services community, Holman Parts Distribution sets a bold example that many more fleets can follow. Their successful demonstration of applied sustainability practices affirms the importance of such practices, and fleets who take these steps will be honored and recognized further for their leadership,” said NAFA Chief Executive Officer Phillip E, Russo, CAE. “NAFA expects that with the Sustainable Fleet Accreditation Program’s easy enrollment process, many more fleets will soon join them, bringing true and quantifiable sustainability improvements to their organizations.”Established in 1946, Holman Parts Distribution, Inc. has been a select partner for major OEM brands for automotive powertrain sales, distribution, and core collection. Holman Parts Distribution is a division of the prestigious Holman Automotive Group, a worldwide leader in the automobile business.NAFA’s Sustainable Fleet Accreditation Program includes tools and metrics to concretely measure (and score) fleet progress in emissions reduction, fuel consumption, and increases in fuel efficiency.NAFA’s roster of accredited fleets also includes: Chesterfield County Government, Fleet Services; City of Anaheim, California; City of Austin, Texas; City of Boston, Central Fleet Management; City of Chesapeake, Central Fleet Management; City of Minneapolis, Fleet Services Division; City of Sacramento, Fleet Management Division; County of Sonoma, Fleet Operations; University of Minnesota; Minnesota Department of Transportation; Minnesota Department of Natural Resources; County of Ventura; Dakota County; Eugene Water and Electric Board; Fleet and Surplus Services-MN; Florida Power & Light; Kent Fire Department RFA; Ontario Ministry of Transportation, Fleet Management Centre; Port Authority of New York and New Jersey; Time Warner Cable; Town of Greenwich, Connecticut; University of California, Davis; University of Illinois, Facilities & Services; and Yale University.To find out more about the program or how to enroll, visit www.NAFASustainable.org.About NAFA’s Sustainable Fleet Accreditation ProgramNAFA’s Sustainable Fleet Accreditation Program provides fleets with a single, standard way to assess their real actions and progress on sustainability by recognizing concrete improvements in air quality through reducing emissions, increasing fuel efficiency, and reducing fuel use.NAFA’s Sustainable Fleet Accreditation directly complements the DOE National Fleet Partnership program, the EPA SmartWay program, and other federal efforts, by recognizing fleets for real results achieved in their sustainability efforts.About NAFA Fleet Management AssociationNAFA is the association for professionals who manage fleets of sedans, public safety vehicles, trucks, and buses of all types and sizes, and a wide range of military and off-road equipment for organizations in North America and across the globe. NAFA’s members are responsible for the specification, acquisition, maintenance, repair, fueling, risk management, and remarketing of more than 4.6 million vehicles that drive an estimated 50 billion miles each year. NAFA’s members control assets and services well in excess of $100 billion each year.NAFA’s members manage fleets for corporations covering a wide range of manufacturing and service organizations, governments (whether local, state and/or federal), and public service entities (public safety, law enforcement, educational institutions, utilities, etc.); still other members serve financial institutions, insurance companies, non-profit organizations, and the like. For more information, please visit http://www.nafa.org. Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from NAFA Fleet Management Association


Groves P.,University of Waterloo | Cascante G.,University of Waterloo | Dundas D.,Ontario Ministry of Transportation | Chatterji P.K.,Thurber Engineering Ltd
Canadian Geotechnical Journal | Year: 2011

A geophysical investigation was performed to evaluate the effectiveness of three geophysical methods (electrical resistivity imaging (ERI), seismic refraction (SR), and multiple-channel analysis of surface waves (MASW)) for geotechnical site characterization in swamps and environmentally sensitive wetland areas. The geophysical test results were verified against the results from borehole and cone penetrometer test logs. The ERI results were best for determining the depth to the glacial till. However, the resolution of the ERI survey was not sufficient to accurately predict the upper lithologies. The electrode spacing (4 m) was instead selected to reliably predict the depth to the till, which in this case varied between 4.6 and 10.7 m. The SR results overestimated the depth to the till because of the presence of a stiffness reversal. The MASW results predicted the depth to the refusal till layer less accurately than the ERI method. However, this method was able to detect the three distinct layers above the till, even though the layer thicknesses were consistently underestimated. The complementary use of geophysical techniques was a successful approach in determining the main soil units and the depth to the competent layer (till) at the site. These methods can be used as a basis for further development to optimize a procedure to reduce the number of boreholes required for conventional site investigations in areas that are environmentally sensitive or where access is restricted.


Turan A.,Ontario Ministry of Transportation | Hinchberger S.D.,Hatch Ltd. | El Naggar M.H.,University of Western Ontario
Journal of Geotechnical and Geoenvironmental Engineering | Year: 2012

This paper presents the results of vane shear, laboratory compaction, isotropic consolidation, cyclic triaxial, bender element, and resonant-column tests that were performed to characterize the dynamic properties of an artificial soil called modified glyben. Modified glyben comprises a mixture of glycerin, water, and bentonite that can be used in scaled model tests performed at 1 G or n G in a centrifuge to study seismic soil-structure interaction. The results described in this paper show that the vane shear strength, coefficient of consolidation, dynamic modulus, and damping ratio are strongly influenced by the viscosity of the pore fluid which can be varied by altering the ratio of glycerin-to-water. In addition, the properties of modified glyben are stable during prolonged exposure to air and multiple largestrain load cycles making it a suitable model soil for scaled model tests involving seismic soil-structure interaction. © 2011 American Society of Civil Engineers.


Kortright R.,Ontario Ministry of Transportation | Wakefield S.,University of Toronto
Agriculture and Human Values | Year: 2011

Food security is a fundamental element of community health. Informal house-lot food growing, by providing convenient access to diverse varieties of affordable and nutritious produce, can provide an important support for community food security. In this exploratory assessment of the contribution home food gardening makes to community food security, in-depth interviews were conducted with gardeners in two contrasting neighborhoods in Toronto, Canada. A typology of food gardeners was developed, and this qualitative understanding of residential food production was then assessed from a community food security perspective. It was found that growing food contributes to food security at all income levels by encouraging a more nutritious diet. The sustainability of household food sourcing and gardeners' overall health and well-being also increased with food production. Secure access to suitable land to grow food and gardening skills were the most significant barriers found to residential food production. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.


News Article | November 8, 2016
Site: www.marketwired.com

OPP campaign targeting few bad apples shouldn't tarnish majority of drivers who are safest in ON TORONTO, ONTARIO--(Marketwired - Nov. 8, 2016) - The Ontario Trucking Association is reminding the trucking industry to remain vigilant and respectful on the highway and emphasized that improving road safety continues to be the number one priority of the vast majority of truck operators in Ontario. OTA, which is a strong and vocal supporter of enhancing road safety by and for all road users, made the announcement today as the OPP launched a new road safety campaign designed to target aggressive car, bus and truck drivers who tailgate, speed, and make unsafe lane changes. During the campaign, OPP plans to charge violators under Ontario's Street Racing and Stunt Driving Legislation. Although it's unfortunate a few operators still need the enforcement community to remind them how to conduct themselves on the highway, most trucking operators lead by example of how road users should operate their vehicles safely and abide by the Highway Traffic Act, says Stephen Laskowski, president of the Ontario Trucking Association. The latest Ontario Road Safety Annual Report (ORSAR) from the Ontario Ministry of Transportation which contains the results for 2013 (the latest year for which complete data is available), confirms that trucks are overwhelmingly the safest vehicles on the road while truck operators are the safest drivers compared to other types of road users. "Like most enforcement programs, these campaigns are designed to change the behavior of the 1 per cent of our industry who need the law enforcement community to tell them the right thing to do. The vast majority of trucking fleets use driver training programs, management systems and technology to ensure that professionals entrusted to drive their vehicles are operating in the safest manner possible," he said. The preponderance of trucking firms consider professional driver development a foundation of their business management practices while also adopting leading-edge technology to assist in improving driving and vehicle performance. Examples include electronic stability control, lane departure warning and forward collision warning systems, among other tools and equipment. Furthermore, vehicle diagnostics and event monitoring recorders provide trucking fleets the opportunity to proactively manage their operations and improve driver performance on an ongoing basis. OTA adds that as a result of the association's lobbying efforts 10 years ago, all trucks weighing 26,000 lbs or more operating in the province are required to use an electronic speed limiter set to a maximum speed of 105 km/h. The measure has helped improve highway traffic safety since it was introduced. "Trucks are the heartbeat of Ontario's economy. Every day, over 200,000 professional truck operators who share the road with the public deliver goods safely to consumers and adhere to the laws of Ontario," says Laskowski. "Those who don't act responsibly are a tiny minority who do a disservice to the hard-working, committed men and women in our industry."


Rahman M.A.,Ontario Ministry of Transportation | Sritharan S.,Iowa State University
PCI Journal | Year: 2015

This paper presents an investigation of seismic performance of precast, posttensioned concrete jointed wall systems designed for five-, seven-, and ten-story buildings. These buildings were designed using the direct displacement approach to reduce the design base shear compared with the force-based design approach. Using earthquake motions of different intensities, the performance of each building was evaluated using response parameters such as the maximum transient interstory drift, floor acceleration, and residual interstory drift. The three buildings performed satisfactorily in terms of the maximum transient interstory drift and residual interstory drift for all seismic events. In some cases the maximum floor accelerations of the sevenand ten-story buildings exceeded the acceptable limits, and thus a strategy to control floor accelerations in these buildings by modifying the wall dimensions is suggested. It was identified that the low-rise building achieved transient interstory drifts closer to the acceptable limits than the taller buildings. An opposite trend was observed regarding the floor acceleration. In taller jointed wall systems, the average interstory drift of the building was less sensitive to the increase in maximum interstory drift than that in a low-rise, jointed wall system.


Bentley K.,Ontario Ministry of Transportation | Reid S.,Ontario Ministry of Transportation
Proceedings, Annual Conference - Canadian Society for Civil Engineering | Year: 2015

The Construction Manager, General Contractor (CMGC) is a new alternative contract delivery model for the Ministry of Transportation Ontario (Ministry). The intent of CMGC is to form a collaborative team, between the owner, designer and a contractor, which begins in design and continues throughout construction. During design the contractor provides construction expertise and constructability input into the design with the intent to become the general contractor during construction. In 2011, MTO initiated its first CMGC project, the Cayuga Bridge replacement project. The Cayuga Bridge constructed in 1924 is a five span, 190 m long, steel through truss bridge is at the end of its' life. This Grand River crossing provides access to the community of Cayuga and carries gas and telephone utilities. With no alternative crossing nearby, closing the bridge to accommodate construction for two years is not a viable option. Adding to the complexity of the project, the Grand River provides habitat for many endangered aquatic species, and the west banks of the Grand River are identified to be a significant archaeological site with artifacts dating back to 8000 BC. Through the collaborative CMGC team approach, an innovative construction staging design was completed that minimized environmental and archaeological impacts while maintaining traffic and utility services throughout construction. This paper will include the rationale for selecting the CMGC model, an overview of how the model works and how the work has unfolded on the Cayuga Bridge project. © (2015) by the Canadian Society for Civil Engineering All rights reserved.


Li N.,Ontario Ministry of Transportation
ICCTP 2010: Integrated Transportation Systems: Green, Intelligent, Reliable - Proceedings of the 10th International Conference of Chinese Transportation Professionals | Year: 2010

Ministry of Transportation of Ontario (MTO) has been one of the pioneering agencies that use Pavement Management System (PMS) analysis tools in the implementation of annual pavement maintenance and rehabilitation (M&R) programming and investment planning at the network level. Currently, the MTO is in the process of upgrading its PMS by integrating pavement preservation (PP) strategies into the long-term pavement rehabilitation program. In this program, a practical PP model being developed through a set of decision trees that ensure the most cost-effective preservation treatments are selected for each pavement section. A number of factors and engineering standards are considered in the process of selecting individual PP strategies, including road functional class, traffic volume, pavement type and age, road condition, and constructability. The preservation program is developed through budget optimization process that determines the most cost-effective PP strategy for every pavement segments. © 2010 ASCE.


Byrne P.A.,Ontario Ministry of Transportation | Ma T.,Ontario Ministry of Transportation | Elzohairy Y.,Ontario Ministry of Transportation
Accident Analysis and Prevention | Year: 2016

Although vehicle impoundment has become a common sanction for various driving offences, large-scale evaluations of its effectiveness in preventing drinking and driving recidivism are almost non-existent in the peer-reviewed literature. One reason is that impoundment programs have typically been introduced simultaneously with other countermeasures, rendering it difficult to disentangle any observed effects. Previous studies of impoundment effectiveness conducted when such programs were implemented in isolation have typically been restricted to small jurisdictions, making high-quality evaluation difficult. In contrast, Ontario's “long-term” and “seven-day” impoundment programs were implemented in relative isolation, but with tight relationships to already existing drinking and driving suspensions. In this work, we used offence data produced by Ontario's population of over 9 million licensed drivers to perform interrupted time series analysis on drinking and driving recidivism and on rates of driving while suspended for drinking and driving. Our results demonstrate two key findings: (1) impoundment, or its threat, improves compliance with drinking and driving licence suspensions; and (2) addition of impoundment to suspension reduces drinking and driving recidivism, possibly through enhanced suspension compliance. © 2016

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