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Islamabad, Pakistan

Batool A.,Gomal University | Abdullah K.,Ministry of Textile Industry | Mamoon-Ur-Rashid M.,Gomal University | Khattak M.K.,Gomal University | Abbas S.S.,Gomal University
Pakistan Journal of Zoology | Year: 2014

Effect of prey density on biology and functional response of green lacewing, Chrysoperla carnea (Stephens) (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae) was studied in the laboratory of Entomology Section of Agricultural Research Institute, Dera Ismail Khan at 25±1°C, 65±5% RH and 10:14 light : dark regime. Newly emerged larvae of C. carnea were fed 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90 and 100 fresh eggs of Sitotroga cerealella (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae) in 9 cm petri dishes. It was observed that the prey density had a significant effect on positive consumption rate, development and fecundity of C. carnea. In general maximum consumption with shortest developmental time, maximum fecundity and longest adult longevity were observed as prey density increased. In all treatments, predatory potential was high when the prey density was raised. Daily predation rate of C. carnea increased slowly during the first two instars and reached to its peak in the third larval instar. Although, C. carnea completed its development at all prey densities, the increase in prey densities reduced developmental time and mortality. Lacewing larvae provided with an overabundance of S. cerealella eggs developed faster than the larvae provided with fewer eggs. Lacewing fed during larval stage with 20 eggs/day showed lowest fecundity with the increase in prey density. A smaller intrinsic rate of increase was due to the fact that the population fed at a low prey density had prolonged developmental time, higher mortality rate in immature stages as well as a low daily rate of progeny. © Copyright 2014 Zoological Society of Pakistan. Source


Mamoon-Ur-Rashid M.,Gomal University | Khattak M.K.,Gomal University | Abdullah K.,Ministry of Textile Industry
Pakistan Journal of Zoology | Year: 2012

Field trials were carried out to compare the effect of neem (Azadirachta indica A. Juss) oil at 1%, 1.5% and 2% and neem seed water extract at 1%, 2% and 3% concentration with that of synthetic insecticide (Polytrin C® 440 EC) against Bemisia tabaci, Amrasca devastans, Thrips tabaci, Earias insulana, Pectinophora gossypiella and Helicoverpa armigera. The treatments were administered four times during the cotton growing season and observation were recorded before one day and after 24, 72, 144, 216 and 288 days of treatment application. Neem oil at 2% and neem seed water extract at 3% significantly reduced the whitefly, jassids and thrips infestation up to 12 days after spray as compared to that in the control. Similar trend in population reduction of sucking insect pests of cotton was observed in other three treatment applications. Synthetic insecticide proved to be more toxic against the test insects than neem based treatments at any interval. Neem derivatives at all concentrations badly affected the attack of Spotted bollworm where as only at higher concentrations adversely affected the attack of pink bollworms up to 12 days after spray. Plots treated with 1.5% and 2% neem oil and 3% neem seed water extract resulted in to significantly higher yield as compared to that in the control. Polytrin C® 440 EC in all cases was highly toxic to the test insects as compared to any other treatment. Copyright 2012 Zoological Society of Pakistan. Source


Mamoon-Ur-Rashid M.,Gomal University | Khattak M.K.,Gomal University | Abdullah K.,Ministry of Textile Industry | Hashim M.M.,Gomal University | And 2 more authors.
African Entomology | Year: 2013

Laboratory studies were conducted to investigate the toxic, growth-inhibiting and antifeedant/deterrent effects of neem derivatives on spotted bollworm and its effects on the parasitism potential and adult emergence of Trichogramma chilonis. Neem oil at 1, 1.5 and 2 % and neem seed water extract at 3 % concentrations not only significantly killed more spotted bollworm larvae but also reduced the number of surviving larvae that pupated. However, neem oil and neem seed water extract at 1 % did not affect adult emergence in the tested insect. Neem oil at 1.5 and 2 % and neem seed water extract at 3 % significantly reduced the number of larvae on treated leaves. Percentage parasitism of bollworm eggs by T. chilonis was significantly reduced when they were placed on leaves treated with 2 % neem oil, Polytrin-C® (40 % profenofos + 4 % Cypermethrin) and 3 % neem seed water extract, but adult emergence of T. chilonis was not affected by any of the neem treatments. Similarly, the F1 progeny parasitized the bollworm untreated eggs normally and the emergence of F2 progeny was not affected by neem treatments. However, Polytrin-C® significantly reduced parasitism of the bollworm eggs by T. chilonis and adult emergence of the parasitoid. Source


Rashid M.M.U.,Gomal University | Khattak M.K.,Gomal University | Abdullah K.,Ministry of Textile Industry | Amir M.,Ministry of Textile Industry | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Animal and Plant Sciences | Year: 2012

The feeding potential of Chrysoperla carnea larvae and adults of Cryptolaemus montrouzieri on different nymphal instars of cotton mealybug, Phenacoccus solenopsis was investigated in ambient laboratory conditions at Agricultural Research Institute, Dera Ismail Khan, Pakistan. Both predators were found very active and successfully consumed all the nymphal instars of P. solenopsis. The daily predation rate of C. carnea larvae increased slowly during the first two larval instars and reached to its peak in the third larval instar. First instar nymphs of P. solenopsis were the most preferred food of different larval instars of C. carnea. Third instar larvae of C. carnea were the most voracious feeder and consumed significantly high number of first, second and third instars nymphs of mealybug as compared to first and second instar larvae of the predator. Adult C. montrouzieri consumed significantly more first instar nymphs of mealybug than second and third instar nymphs. These results indicate that C. carnea and C. montrouzieri have great potential for the biological control of P. solenopsis. Source

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