Ministry of Natural Resources and Tourism

Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

Ministry of Natural Resources and Tourism

Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
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Stephenson P.J.,WWF International | Stephenson P.J.,IUCN SSC Species Monitoring Specialist Group | Bowles-Newark N.,United Nations Environment Programme World Conservation Monitoring Center | Regan E.,United Nations Environment Programme World Conservation Monitoring Center | And 26 more authors.
Biological Conservation | Year: 2016

African countries need to conserve biodiversity and use natural resources rationally if they are to avoid continued environmental degradation that jeopardizes sustainable development and human wellbeing. However, many government agencies cannot access or use the biodiversity data they need to make informed decisions for environmental and economic management. More than forty stakeholders representing governments, civil society organizations (CSOs) and UN agencies, including delegates from 20 African states, identified decisions that require biodiversity information and explored blockages and potential solutions to data access and use. The participants concluded that the key enabling environment includes data availability, data quality and usability, willingness to collect and use data, and financial and technical capacity. We recommend that African government departments across sectors work with academic bodies and CSOs to: i) enhance internal resources for monitoring and develop partnerships with donors; ii) build capacity for data collection, using tools, guidelines and communities surrounding CBD planning and biodiversity monitoring; iii) improve national and international co-ordination and cross-sectoral collaboration for biodiversity data management; iv) produce and use more data-derived products that encourage data use, especially assessments that demonstrate the importance of biodiversity to economies and wellbeing and dashboards that facilitate interpretation and analysis. Governments, CSOs and academic bodies should test different science-policy interfaces in a handful of pilot countries or regions, building on existing models to demonstrate how data providers and users can work together to break down barriers to data access and sharing and mainstream biodiversity information into decision-making. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd.


Liang J.,West Virginia University | Crowther T.W.,Yale University | Picard N.,Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations | Wiser S.,Landcare Research | And 79 more authors.
Science (New York, N.Y.) | Year: 2016

The biodiversity-productivity relationship (BPR) is foundational to our understanding of the global extinction crisis and its impacts on ecosystem functioning. Understanding BPR is critical for the accurate valuation and effective conservation of biodiversity. Using ground-sourced data from 777,126 permanent plots, spanning 44 countries and most terrestrial biomes, we reveal a globally consistent positive concave-down BPR, showing that continued biodiversity loss would result in an accelerating decline in forest productivity worldwide. The value of biodiversity in maintaining commercial forest productivity alone-US$166 billion to 490 billion per year according to our estimation-is more than twice what it would cost to implement effective global conservation. This highlights the need for a worldwide reassessment of biodiversity values, forest management strategies, and conservation priorities. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.


Liang J.,West Virginia University | Crowther T.W.,Netherlands Institute of Ecology | Crowther T.W.,Yale University | Picard N.,Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations | And 97 more authors.
Science | Year: 2016

The biodiversity-productivity relationship (BPR) is foundational to our understanding of the global extinction crisis and its impacts on ecosystem functioning. Understanding BPR is critical for the accurate valuation and effective conservation of biodiversity. Using ground-sourced data from 777,126 permanent plots, spanning 44 countries and most terrestrial biomes, we reveal a globally consistent positive concave-down BPR, showing that continued biodiversity loss would result in an accelerating decline in forest productivity worldwide. The value of biodiversity in maintaining commercial forest productivity alone - US$166 billion to 490 billion per year according to our estimation - is more than twice what it would cost to implement effective global conservation. This highlights the need for a worldwide reassessment of biodiversity values, forest management strategies, and conservation priorities. © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science. All rights reserved.


PubMed | James Cook University, Institute of Tropical Forest Conservation, University of Zürich, Pontifical Catholic University of Ecuador and 59 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Science (New York, N.Y.) | Year: 2016

The biodiversity-productivity relationship (BPR) is foundational to our understanding of the global extinction crisis and its impacts on ecosystem functioning. Understanding BPR is critical for the accurate valuation and effective conservation of biodiversity. Using ground-sourced data from 777,126 permanent plots, spanning 44 countries and most terrestrial biomes, we reveal a globally consistent positive concave-down BPR, showing that continued biodiversity loss would result in an accelerating decline in forest productivity worldwide. The value of biodiversity in maintaining commercial forest productivity alone-US$166 billion to 490 billion per year according to our estimation-is more than twice what it would cost to implement effective global conservation. This highlights the need for a worldwide reassessment of biodiversity values, forest management strategies, and conservation priorities.

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