Ministry of National Defense

Taipei, Taiwan

Ministry of National Defense

Taipei, Taiwan

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News Article | April 26, 2017
Site: hosted2.ap.org

(AP) — China has launched its first aircraft carrier built entirely on its own, in a demonstration of the growing technical sophistication of its defense industries and determination to safeguard its maritime territorial claims and crucial trade routes. The 50,000-ton carrier was towed from its dockyard just after 9 a.m. Wednesday following a ceremony in the northern port city of Dalian, where its predecessor, the Soviet-built Liaoning, also underwent extensive refurbishing before being commissioned in 2012, the Ministry of National Defense said. Development of the new carrier began in 2013 and construction in late 2015. It's expected to be formally commissioned sometime before 2020, after sea trials and the arrival of its full air complement. Vice chairman of China's Central Military Commission and Communist Party Central Committee member Fan Changlong presided over the launch, which came just three days after the anniversary of the People's Liberation Army Navy's symbolic founding in 1949. Also attending was navy commander Vice Adm. Shen Jinlong, a former commander of the South Sea Fleet responsible for defending China's claim to virtually the entire South China Sea. Reports of the launch said a bottle of champagne was broken across the ship's bow and other craft in the port sounded their horns in celebration. Like the 60,000-ton Liaoning, which was purchased from the Ukraine, the new carrier is based on the Soviet Kuznetsov class design, with a ski jump-style deck for taking off and a conventional oil-fueled steam turbine power plant. That limits the weight of payloads its planes can carry, its speed and the amount of time it can spend at sea relative to American nuclear-powered carriers. The main hull of the new carrier has been completed and its power supply put into place. Next up are mooring tests and the debugging of its electronic systems, the Defense Ministry said. China is believed to be planning to build at least two and possibly as many as four additional carriers, with one of them, the Type 002, reported to be already under construction at a shipyard outside Shanghai. They are expected to be closer in size to the U.S. Navy's nuclear-powered 100,000-ton Nimitz class ships, with flat flight decks and catapults to allow planes to launch with more bombs and fuel aboard. Along with their role in protecting China's maritime interests, Chinese naval strategists see the carrier program as "about having naval power commensurate with China's international status, to impress both external and domestic audiences," said Michael Chase, an expert on the Chinese military at U.S. think tank the RAND Corporation. The new carrier "is likely to be seen as further evidence of China's desire to become the most powerful and influential country in the region," Chase said. That will be especially worrying to Indian security analysts who are already concerned about Beijing's ambitions in the Indian Ocean, he said. India, along with Japan and Taiwan which also view Chinese carriers as threats, will likely respond by building new submarines and anti-ship missiles, said Ian Easton, a research Fellow at The Project 2049 Institute in Arlington, Virginia. China's "expansionist behavior in the South China Sea and its aggressive efforts to undermine the security of Taiwan and Japan, in particular, have translated into a situation where few countries now trust that Beijing has benign motives," Easton said. China claims Taiwan as its own territory to be brought under control by force if necessary, and was seen as advertising that threat when it sailed the Liaoning through the Taiwan Strait earlier this year. According to Chinese reports, the new, as yet unnamed, carrier will carry 24 Shenyang J-15 fighters, based on the Russian Sukhoi Su-33, along with 12 helicopters for anti-submarine warfare, airborne early warning and rescue operations. That compares to 85-90 fixed wing aircraft and helicopters carried by a Nimitz-class carrier. The new carrier is part of an ambitious expansion of the Chinese navy, which is projected to have a total of 265-273 warships, submarines and logistics vessels by 2020, according to the Washington, D.C.-based Center for Naval Analysis. That compares with 275 deployable battle force ships presently in the U.S. Navy, China's primary rival in the Asia Pacific. The U.S. operates 10 aircraft carriers, has 62 destroyers to China's 32, and 75 submarines to China's 68. The U.S. Navy has 323,000 personnel to China's 235,000. China has offered little information about the roles it expects its carriers to play, although its planning appears to be evolving as it gains more experience. The Liaoning was initially touted mainly as an experimental and training platform, but in December was declared to be combat-ready and has taken part in live-firing exercises in the South China Sea, where tensions have risen over China's construction of man-made islands complete with airstrips and military structures.


News Article | April 26, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

In this photo released by China's Xinhua News Agency, a newly-built aircraft carrier is transferred from dry dock into the water at a launch ceremony at a shipyard in Dalian in northeastern China's Liaoning Province, Wednesday, April 26, 2017. China launched its first aircraft carrier built entirely on its own on Wednesday, in a demonstration of the growing technical sophistication of its defense industries and determination to safeguard its maritime territorial claims and crucial trade routes. (Li Gang/Xinhua via AP) BEIJING (AP) — China has launched its first aircraft carrier built entirely on its own, in a demonstration of the growing technical sophistication of its defense industries and determination to safeguard its maritime territorial claims and crucial trade routes. The 50,000-ton carrier was towed from its dockyard just after 9 a.m. Wednesday following a ceremony in the northern port city of Dalian, where its predecessor, the Soviet-built Liaoning, underwent extensive refurbishing before being commissioned in 2012, the Ministry of National Defense said. Development of the new carrier began in 2013 and construction in late 2015. It's expected to be formally commissioned sometime before 2020, after sea trials and the arrival of its full air complement. The carrier program is a key part of China's naval expansion at a time when it is looking to beef-up its regional military influence to match its economic might. While China says it maintains a defensive military policy, its ambitions are rattling some neighbors who see Beijing as fueling already enflamed tensions in the region. Chinese naval strategists see the carrier program not only as a means to protect their country's maritime interests, but also to have "naval power commensurate with China's international status, to impress both external and domestic audiences," said Michael Chase, an expert on the Chinese military at U.S. think tank the RAND Corporation. The new carrier "is likely to be seen as further evidence of China's desire to become the most powerful and influential country in the region," he said. That will be especially worrying to Indian security analysts who are already concerned about Beijing's ambitions in the Indian Ocean, he said. India, along with Japan and Taiwan which also view Chinese carriers as threats, will likely respond by building new submarines and anti-ship missiles, said Ian Easton, a research Fellow at The Project 2049 Institute in Arlington, Virginia. China's "expansionist behavior in the South China Sea and its aggressive efforts to undermine the security of Taiwan and Japan, in particular, have translated into a situation where few countries now trust that Beijing has benign motives," Easton said. Chinese foreign ministry spokesman Geng Shuang reiterated China's contention that it maintains a purely defense military posture and "sticks to the path of peaceful development. "The purpose to develop national defense forces including the navy is to safeguard our national sovereignty, security and development interests, as well as the peace of the world," Geng told reporters Wednesday at a daily news conference. China has offered little information about the roles it expects its carriers to play, although its planning appears to be evolving as it gains more experience. The Liaoning was initially touted mainly as an experimental and training platform, but in December was declared to be combat-ready and has taken part in live-firing exercises in the South China Sea, where tensions have risen over China's construction of man-made islands complete with airstrips and military structures. Earlier this year the Liaoning sailed through the Taiwan Strait, which was seen as a message to Taiwan, which China claims as its own territory to be brought under control by force if necessary. Wednesday's launch was presided over by the vice chairman of China's Central Military Commission and Communist Party Central Committee, Fan Changlong, and came just three days after the anniversary of the People's Liberation Army Navy's symbolic founding in 1949. Also attending was navy commander Vice Adm. Shen Jinlong, a former commander of the South Sea Fleet responsible for defending China's claim to virtually the entire South China Sea. Reports of the launch said a bottle of champagne was broken across the ship's bow and other craft in the port sounded their horns in celebration. Like the 60,000-ton Liaoning, which was purchased from the Ukraine, the new carrier is based on the Soviet Kuznetsov class design, with a ski jump-style deck for taking off and a conventional oil-fueled steam turbine power plant. That limits the weight of the payloads its planes can carry, its speed and the amount of time it can spend at sea relative to American nuclear-powered carriers. The main hull of the new carrier has been completed and its power supply put into place. Next up are mooring tests and the debugging of its electronic systems, the Defense Ministry said. China is believed to be planning to build at least two and possibly as many as four additional carriers, with one of them, the Type 002, reported to be already under construction at a shipyard outside Shanghai. They are expected to be closer in size to the U.S. Navy's nuclear-powered 100,000-ton Nimitz class ships, with flat flight decks and catapults to allow planes to launch with more bombs and fuel aboard. According to Chinese reports, the new, as yet unnamed, carrier will carry 24 Shenyang J-15 fighters, based on the Russian Sukhoi Su-33, along with 12 helicopters for anti-submarine warfare, airborne early warning and rescue operations. That compares to 85-90 fixed wing aircraft and helicopters carried by a Nimitz-class carrier. As China expands its navy, it is projected to have a total of 265-273 warships, submarines and logistics vessels by 2020, according to the Washington, D.C.-based Center for Naval Analysis. That compares with 275 deployable battle force ships presently in the U.S. Navy, China's primary rival in the Asia Pacific. The U.S. operates 10 aircraft carriers, has 62 destroyers to China's 32, and 75 submarines to China's 68. The U.S. Navy has 323,000 personnel to China's 235,000.


News Article | April 26, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

In this photo released by China's Xinhua News Agency, a newly-built aircraft carrier is transferred from dry dock into the water at a launch ceremony at a shipyard in Dalian in northeastern China's Liaoning Province, Wednesday, April 26, 2017. China launched its first aircraft carrier built entirely on its own on Wednesday, in a demonstration of the growing technical sophistication of its defense industries and determination to safeguard its maritime territorial claims and crucial trade routes. (Li Gang/Xinhua via AP) BEIJING (AP) — China has launched its first aircraft carrier built entirely on its own, in a demonstration of the growing technical sophistication of its defense industries and determination to safeguard its maritime territorial claims and crucial trade routes. The 50,000-ton carrier was towed from its dockyard just after 9 a.m. Wednesday following a ceremony in the northern port city of Dalian, where its predecessor, the Soviet-built Liaoning, also underwent extensive refurbishing before being commissioned in 2012, the Ministry of National Defense said. Development of the new carrier began in 2013 and construction in late 2015. It's expected to be formally commissioned sometime before 2020, after sea trials and the arrival of its full air complement. Vice chairman of China's Central Military Commission and Communist Party Central Committee member Fan Changlong presided over the launch, which came just three days after the anniversary of the People's Liberation Army Navy's symbolic founding in 1949. Also attending was navy commander Vice Adm. Shen Jinlong, a former commander of the South Sea Fleet responsible for defending China's claim to virtually the entire South China Sea. Reports of the launch said a bottle of champagne was broken across the ship's bow and other craft in the port sounded their horns in celebration. Like the 60,000-ton Liaoning, which was purchased from the Ukraine, the new carrier is based on the Soviet Kuznetsov class design, with a ski jump-style deck for taking off and a conventional oil-fueled steam turbine power plant. That limits the weight of payloads its planes can carry, its speed and the amount of time it can spend at sea relative to American nuclear-powered carriers. The main hull of the new carrier has been completed and its power supply put into place. Next up are mooring tests and the debugging of its electronic systems, the Defense Ministry said. China is believed to be planning to build at least two and possibly as many as four additional carriers, with one of them, the Type 002, reported to be already under construction at a shipyard outside Shanghai. They are expected to be closer in size to the U.S. Navy's nuclear-powered 100,000-ton Nimitz class ships, with flat flight decks and catapults to allow planes to launch with more bombs and fuel aboard. Along with their role in protecting China's maritime interests, Chinese naval strategists see the carrier program as "about having naval power commensurate with China's international status, to impress both external and domestic audiences," said Michael Chase, an expert on the Chinese military at U.S. think tank the RAND Corporation. The new carrier "is likely to be seen as further evidence of China's desire to become the most powerful and influential country in the region," Chase said. That will be especially worrying to Indian security analysts who are already concerned about Beijing's ambitions in the Indian Ocean, he said. India, along with Japan and Taiwan which also view Chinese carriers as threats, will likely respond by building new submarines and anti-ship missiles, said Ian Easton, a research Fellow at The Project 2049 Institute in Arlington, Virginia. China's "expansionist behavior in the South China Sea and its aggressive efforts to undermine the security of Taiwan and Japan, in particular, have translated into a situation where few countries now trust that Beijing has benign motives," Easton said. China claims Taiwan as its own territory to be brought under control by force if necessary, and was seen as advertising that threat when it sailed the Liaoning through the Taiwan Strait earlier this year. According to Chinese reports, the new, as yet unnamed, carrier will carry 24 Shenyang J-15 fighters, based on the Russian Sukhoi Su-33, along with 12 helicopters for anti-submarine warfare, airborne early warning and rescue operations. That compares to 85-90 fixed wing aircraft and helicopters carried by a Nimitz-class carrier. The new carrier is part of an ambitious expansion of the Chinese navy, which is projected to have a total of 265-273 warships, submarines and logistics vessels by 2020, according to the Washington, D.C.-based Center for Naval Analysis. That compares with 275 deployable battle force ships presently in the U.S. Navy, China's primary rival in the Asia Pacific.


News Article | April 26, 2017
Site: hosted2.ap.org

(AP) — China launched its first aircraft carrier built entirely on its own on Wednesday, in a demonstration of the growing technical sophistication of its defense industries and determination to safeguard its maritime territorial claims and crucial trade routes. The 50,000-ton carrier left its berth just after 9 a.m. in the northern port city of Dalian, where its predecessor, the Ukrainian-built Liaoning, also underwent extensive refurbishing before being commissioned in 2012, the Ministry of National Defense said. The new carrier is expected to be formally commissioned sometime before 2020 following the completion of sea trials and the arrival of its full air complement. Like the 60,000-ton Liaoning, the new carrier is based on the former Soviet Union's Kuznetsov class design, with a ski jump-style deck for taking off and a conventional oil-fueled steam turbine power plant. That limits the weight of payloads its planes can carry, its speed and the amount of time it can spend at sea relative to American nuclear-powered carriers. China is believed to be planning to build at least two and possibly as many as four additional carriers, with one of them, the Type 002, reported to be already under construction at a shipyard outside Shanghai. They are expected to be closer in size to the U.S. Navy's nuclear-powered 100,000-ton Nimitz class ships, with flat flight decks and catapults to allow planes to launch with more bombs and fuel aboard. According to Chinese reports, the new carrier will carry 24 Shenyang J-15 fighters, based on the Russian Sukhoi Su-33, along with 12 helicopters for anti-submarine warfare, airborne early warning and rescue operations. That compares to 85-90 fixed wing aircraft and helicopters carried by a Nimitz-class carrier. The new carrier is part of an ambitious expansion of the Chinese navy, which is projected to have a total of 265-273 warships, submarines and logistics vessels by 2020, according to the Washington, D.C.-based Center for Naval Analysis. That compares with 275 deployable battle force ships presently in the U.S. Navy, China's primary rival in the Asia Pacific. The U.S. operates 10 aircraft carriers, has 62 destroyers to China's 32, and 75 submarines to China's 68. The U.S. Navy has 323,000 personnel to China's 235,000. China's navy has made strides in spreading its global reach since it established a permanent overseas presence by joining in multinational anti-piracy patrols off Somalia in 2008. It has cruised in the Mediterranean Sea and the Persian Gulf and helped evacuate Chinese and foreign nationals amid civil strife in Libya in 2011 and Yemen in 2015, the year it took part in its first Mediterranean joint naval exercises with Russia. China has offered little information about the roles it expects its carriers to play, although its planning appears to be evolving as it gains more experience. The Liaoning was initially touted mainly as an experimental and training platform, but in December was declared to be combat-ready and has taken part in live-firing exercises in the South China Sea, where tensions have risen over China's construction of man-made islands complete with airstrips and military structures. Building on that experience, the new carrier can be expected to take on an even more active role, cruising in the South China Sea, the East China Sea and possibly into the Western Pacific beyond the "first island chain" that blocks its access to open seas. Meanwhile, China's naval expansion is also fueling a reported push for a five-fold expansion of the marine corps to as many as 100,000 troops.


Hill R.R.,Air Force Institute of Technology | Cho Y.K.,Ministry of National Defense | Moore J.T.,Air Force Institute of Technology
Computers and Operations Research | Year: 2012

This paper introduces new problem-size reduction heuristics for the multidimensional knapsack problem. These heuristics are based on solving a relaxed version of the problem, using the dual variables to formulate a Lagrangian relaxation of the original problem, and then solving an estimated core problem to achieve a heuristic solution to the original problem. We demonstrate the performance of these heuristics as compared to legacy heuristics and two other problem reduction heuristics for the multi-dimensional knapsack problem. We discuss problems with existing test problems and discuss the use of an improved test problem generation approach. We use a competitive test to highlight the performance of our heuristics versus the legacy heuristic approaches. We also introduce the concept of computational versus competitive problem test data sets as a means to focus the empirical analysis of heuristic performance. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Hsu C.-Y.,National Chiao Tung University | Chang H.-G.,Ministry of National Defense | Chen M.-J.,National Chiao Tung University
IEEE Transactions on Electron Devices | Year: 2011

For metal-gate high-k dielectrics, there is a transition region in the electron gate tunneling current Ig, as characterized by a plot of dlnIg/dVg versus Vg. In this paper, we systematically construct a new fitting over the region, which can accurately determine material parameters, including metal work function, high-k electron affinity, and tunneling effective masses of electrons. First of all, a calculation of gate current due to electron direct tunneling and/or FowlerNordheim tunneling from an inversion layer is performed, yielding the guidelines of the fitting. Experimental samples are presented with n-channel metaloxidesemiconductor field-effect transistors having low effective oxide thickness (1.4 nm) TaC/HfSiON/SiON gate stacks. Underlying material parameters are extracted accordingly and remain valid for higher temperature and gate voltage. We also demonstrate that a conventional method without a dlnI g/dVg fitting might lead to erroneous results. Thus, the dlnIg/dVg fitting is crucial to metal-gate high-k material parameter assessment. © 2011 IEEE.


News Article | February 17, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

Brown Comes Out of Retirement to Help Active/Retired Members of the Military and First Responders Combat Chemical Dependency and Psychological Disorders SAN ANTONIO, TX--(Marketwired - February 17, 2017) - Warriors Heart, the Texas Hill Country-based private treatment facility serving active and veteran members of the military and first responders, today named retired U.S. Army Colonel Joe Brown the organization's executive director. "Colonel Brown is coming out of retirement to join the front lines against chemical dependency and related psychological disorders so many of our active and retired members of the military and first responders suffer due to the traumas they have experienced," said Josh Lannon, co-founder of Warriors Heart. "Joe's military background gives him a level of understanding and rapport that will be invaluable to our mission of helping these national heroes." Retired U.S. Army Colonel Joe Brown served more than 25 years in active duty, specializing in operational logistics and medical service. He also served as deputy to the director of logistics in Iraq, supporting more than 144,000 coalition forces of the Combined Joint Task Force-Seven during Operation Iraqi Freedom. Colonel Brown also commanded the 16th Corps Support Group, consisting of 3,500 soldiers who supported the U.S. Army's V Corps during major combat operations in Iraq in 2003. Colonel Brown also served as Chief, Ambulatory Care Support Branch at the Frankfurt Regional Medical Center in Germany and Health Care Administrator at Darmstadt Health Clinic, which supported over 40,000 military and family members. After retiring from the Army in 2004, Brown was a logistics consultant for Northrop Grumman Corporation, providing consulting services to the Romanian Ministry of National Defense in Bucharest, Romania. From 2005 to 2015, he was an associate partner in IBM Corporation's Global Business Services in support of Army and U.S. Department of Defense security missions. "I could no longer sit back and be silent as more than 20 veterans commit suicide every day," said Brown. "We are losing more veterans to alcoholism, drug addiction and suicide than we are in combat. The VA is backlogged, and our veterans are not getting the help they need and deserve." Warriors Heart is a 40-bed licensed and accredited treatment center dedicated to helping adult men and women 18 and older who suffer from chemical dependence and co-occurring psychological disorders related to post-traumatic stress disorder, moral grief/injury, anxiety, depression, etc., or the psychological effects of mild traumatic brain injury. Located in a rustic ranch setting in the Texas Hill Country northwest of San Antonio, Warriors Heart focuses specifically on helping individuals (active and veteran) who protect and serve the United States and its citizens -- the U.S. military, as well as first responders, including police and law enforcement officers, firefighters, paramedics, and civilian warriors. Warriors Heart offers drug and alcohol treatment programs, PTSD and MTBI therapy, and inpatient and outpatient long-term sober living services. Located within easy driving distance from Houston and Austin, Warriors Heart facilitates healing with dignity and respect in a private, home-like, and judgment-free environment. Statistics show that many people try to cope with their PTSD symptoms by drinking heavily or using drugs. According to the National Center for PTSD, there is a strong relationship between PTSD and substance abuse disorder (SUD) in both civilian and military populations, as well as for both men and women. About one in 10 soldiers returning from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have a problem with alcohol or drugs. Similar numbers can be found among first responders, who face horrors in their work most of us cannot imagine. In helping everyday people in the worst of times, they witness death, destruction and much of the darkest side of human nature -- and first responders today seem to be exposed to more trauma than ever before. Service to country and to our nation's warriors is a charge that runs deep in the blood of Brown and his entire family. In addition to his own military service, Brown is the father of two sons who currently serve in the military -- one in the Army and one in the Navy. His wife, Rena, is an addiction nurse at Warriors Heart. "Joe had devoted his entire adult life to taking care of our nation's courageous warriors -- those who have served and sacrificed so much and have earned a full measure of honor, dignity and respect," said Warriors Heart co-founder Lisa Lannon. "We are grateful for his willingness to be directly involved in the important, life-changing work we are doing at Warriors Heart every day." Warriors Heart provides private treatment to adult men and women 18 and older seeking inpatient and outpatient treatment for chemical dependency and co-occurring psychological disorders related to post-traumatic stress disorder or the psychological effects of mild traumatic brain injury. Headquartered in the Texas Hill Country northwest of San Antonio, Warriors Heart treats individuals (active and veteran) who protect and serve the United States and its citizens -- the U.S. military, as well as first responders, including police and law enforcement, firefighters, paramedics and civilian warriors. Warriors Heart was founded by Josh and Lisa Lannon, who have built and operated six substance abuse treatment centers since 2002 and Tom Spooner, retired Army Special Forces. Warriors Heart is fully licensed by the Texas State Department of Health Services and Joint Commission Accredited. For more information, visit www.WarriorsHeart.com.


Wai R.-J.,Yuan Ze University | Lin C.-Y.,Ministry of National Defense | Liaw J.-J.,Yuan Ze University | Chang Y.-R.,Institute of Nuclear Energy Research of Taiwan
IEEE Transactions on Industrial Electronics | Year: 2011

A newly designed zero-voltage-switching (ZVS) multi-input converter is proposed in this paper. The converter can boost the different voltages of two power sources to a stable output voltage. An auxiliary circuit is employed for achieving turn-on ZVS of all switches in the proposed converter. According to various situations, the operational states of the proposed converter can be divided into two states, including a single-power-supply and a dual-power-supply state. In the dual-power-supply state, the input circuits connected in series together with the designed pulsewidth modulation can greatly reduce the conduction loss of the switches. In addition, the effectiveness of the designed circuit topology and the ZVS properties are verified by experimental results, and the goal of high-efficiency conversion can be obtained. © 2011 IEEE.


Wai R.-J.,Yuan Ze University | Lee J.-D.,National formosa University | Chuang K.-L.,Ministry of National Defense
IEEE Transactions on Industrial Electronics | Year: 2011

This paper focuses on the design of a real-time particle-swarm- optimization-based proportional-integral-differential (PSO-PID) control scheme for the levitated balancing and propulsive positioning of a magnetic-levitation (maglev) transportation system. The dynamic model of a maglev transportation system, including levitated electromagnets and a propulsive linear induction motor based on the concepts of mechanical geometry and motion dynamics, is first constructed. The control objective is to design a real-time PID control methodology via PSO gain selections and to directly ensure the stability of the controlled system without the requirement of strict constraints, detailed system information, and auxiliary compensated controllers despite the existence of uncertainties. The effectiveness of the proposed PSO-PID control scheme for the maglev transportation system is verified by numerical simulations and experimental results, and its superiority is indicated in comparison with PSO-PID in previous literature and conventional sliding-mode (SM) control strategies. With the proposed PSO-PID control scheme, the controlled maglev transportation system possesses the advantages of favorable control performance without chattering phenomena in SM control and robustness to uncertainties superior to fixed-gain PSO-PID control. © 2011 IEEE.


Wai R.-J.,Yuan Ze University | Lin C.-Y.,Ministry of National Defense
IEEE Transactions on Industrial Electronics | Year: 2011

This paper focuses on the design of a dual active low-frequency ripple control for a clean-energy power-conditioning mechanism with an aim to achieve both the alleviation of the low-frequency current ripple of clean-energy sources (e.g., solar photovoltaic, fuel cell, etc.) and the improvement of the ac power quality of a power conditioner. First, a simplified circuit for representing both the current-ripple phenomena at the high-voltage bus and the polluted ac output terminal inside a general power conditioner, including a dc-dc converter and a dc-ac inverter, is derived, and the dynamic model of a dual active low-frequency ripple control circuit is analyzed. Moreover, two adaptive linear neural networks are taken as neural filters to generate the compensation current commands, and an adaptive total sliding-mode controller is designed to manipulate the ripple control circuit for injecting respective suitable compensation currents into the high-voltage bus and the ac output terminal of the conditioner. In addition, the effectiveness of the proposed dual active low-frequency ripple control framework is verified by numerical simulations and experimental results. © 2006 IEEE.

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