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Sivek M.,VSB - Technical University of Ostrava | Vlcek T.,Masaryk University | Kavina P.,Ministry of Industry and Trade of the Czech Republic | Jirasek J.,VSB - Technical University of Ostrava
Energy Sources, Part B: Economics, Planning and Policy | Year: 2017

In its decision from October 2015, the Government of the Czech Republic corrected its raw material and energy policies by modifying the scope of the territorial ecological limits placed on the mining of lignite. Such action is impacting the energy sector operating in the North Bohemian Basin, the largest region for lignite production in the Czech Republic. This article explains the background of the mining restrictions and the significance of the Czech government’s decision to amend them for the district heating industry; the composition of the future energy portfolio for electricity production; and the energy security of the Czech Republic. © 2017 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC


Sivek M.,VSB - Technical University of Ostrava | Kavina P.,Ministry of Industry and Trade of the Czech Republic | Jirasek J.,VSB - Technical University of Ostrava
Energy Policy | Year: 2011

In November 2008, the European Union adopted "The raw materials initiative - meeting our critical needs for growth and jobs in Europe", dealing especially with ensuring the future needs of metallic and non-metallic raw materials for EU member state economies. After years of hesitation, this may undoubtedly be considered a very progressive step. The article lists the most relevant reasons why the EU should promptly proceed to the discussion and preparation of a similar material of higher legal force for energy minerals. Basic problem areas of forming a political platform for the preparation of the EU energy initiative include the exploitation of domestic energy raw material deposits, raw materials diplomacy, and the matter of renewable sources. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.


Slovakova E.,Ministry of Industry and Trade of the Czech Republic
Proceedings of the 6th International Scientific Symposium on Electrical Power Engineering, ELEKTROENERGETIKA 2011 | Year: 2011

Since January 1, 2006 the electricity market has been fully liberalized (the gas market has been liberalized since January 1, 2007). Customers - households - became eligible customers and gain the right to choose their supplier. In the electricity (and gas) market gradually took place the required legal, accounting and functional separation of network activities from supply and generation of electricity (gas) under EU legislation. The business environment has been changed; the role of the state has been limited. But its instruments may affect investors' decisions about the allocation of investments (impact on GDP and employment). Integration of energy markets is closely related to the connection of electricity transport networks. Important consequence is greater coherence between the energy security of the Czech Republic and the European Union. The choice of energy mix in one state can influence the situation in other countries. The state has to act responsibly. What is the scope of the responsibilities in relation to the impact of liberalization?. Technical University of Košice © 2011.


Fikacek J.,Ministry of Industry and Trade of the Czech Republic | Vlastimil H.,VSB - Technical University of Ostrava | Hummel M.,VSB - Technical University of Ostrava
11th International Multidisciplinary Scientific Geoconference and EXPO - Modern Management of Mine Producing, Geology and Environmental Protection, SGEM 2011 | Year: 2011

Contribution notifies of the variant solutions of the recovery of consequences of chemical uranium mining in the Czech Republic in the Straz pod Ralskem region. Remediation is realized by a state company DIAMO. In the chemical extraction period over four million tons of sulfuric acid and other chemicals were injected into the ground, whereas approximately 370 million cubic meters of groundwater were contaminated. Currently, the contaminated water is pumped from the underground to the surface and it leads to liquidation of contaminants, or economically useful products are produced. The article reports on two versions of a procedure for the rehabilitation and settlement of damage. For the first (advantageous) variant, the remediation objectives will be achieved in 2032, then the operating costs of rehabilitation and liquidation of consequences of uranium mining in the area of the Stráž pod Ralskem will be CZK 32,527 billion € 1,348 billion) and the investment cost will be of CZK 1,485 billion (€ 61,5 million). © SGEM2011 All Rights Reserved by the International Multidisciplinary Scientific GeoConference SGEM.


Fikacek J.,Ministry of Industry and Trade of the Czech Republic | Hummel M.,VSB - Technical University of Ostrava | Vlastimil H.,VSB - Technical University of Ostrava
12th International Multidisciplinary Scientific GeoConference and EXPO - Modern Management of Mine Producing, Geology and Environmental Protection, SGEM 2012 | Year: 2012

Article informs about the problems costs arising from solution after chemical consequences of uranium mining and related activities in the field Straž pod Ralskem. It describes the initial state of the damaged area, briefly the procedure for dealing with the consequences of chemical extraction of uranium up to 2042. At the end of the paper is given overview of costs and expenses and evaluation of the effects of chemical uranium mining and related activities in Straz pod Ralskem leads to some recommendations described here. © SGEM2012 All Rights Reserved by the International Multidisciplinary Scientific GeoConference SGEM Published by STEF92 Technology Ltd.


Sivek M.,VSB - Technical University of Ostrava | Jirasek J.,VSB - Technical University of Ostrava | Kavina P.,Ministry of Industry and Trade of the Czech Republic | Martinikova H.,VSB - Technical University of Ostrava
Energy Sources, Part B: Economics, Planning and Policy | Year: 2013

The structure of the production of electricity in the Czech Republic is based on the structure of its raw material basis that includes reserves of lignite, steam coal, coking coal and uranium. On the other hand, there are only small reserves of crude oil and natural gas in the Czech Republic, a limited potential of hydroelectric power plants, and a relatively small potential for the development of renewable energy. The current production of electricity is therefore based on two pillars: coal-burning and nuclear power plants. With respect to the lignite reserves that are time-limited, the Czech Republic will be obliged to modify its power production strategy in the future and change its energy best mix, i.e., the portfolio of the energy sources used so far. This article analyzes the possible role of uranium in creating the future energy portfolio of the Czech Republic. © 2013 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.


Sivek M.,VSB - Technical University of Ostrava | Kavina P.,Ministry of Industry and Trade of the Czech Republic | Maleckova V.,VSB - Technical University of Ostrava | Jirasek J.,VSB - Technical University of Ostrava
Energy Policy | Year: 2012

In 2010, the Czech Republic was one of the states of the European Union, which met the indicative target for the share of renewable energy sources in gross electricity consumption. That year, gross electricity generation from renewable sources amounted to a total volume of 5851. GWh, which corresponds to 8.24% of gross electricity consumption in the Czech Republic in the given time period. The largest share of the total came from hydroelectric power plants (47.7%) and biomass power plants (25.8%), and a smaller share from photovoltaic power plants (10.5%), biogas power plants (8.7%) and wind farms (5.7%). Compared with 2009, the highest year-on-year growth came from photovoltaic power plants (527. GWh, 44.2%) and, as far as other renewable sources are concerned, electricity generation at hydroelectric power plants (360. GWh, 30.2%) and biogas power plants (184. GWh, 15.4%) rose more sharply as well. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.


Sivek M.,VSB - Technical University of Ostrava | Kavina P.,Ministry of Industry and Trade of the Czech Republic | Jirasek J.,VSB - Technical University of Ostrava | Maleckova V.,VSB - Technical University of Ostrava
Energy Policy | Year: 2012

The Czech Republic is the world's sixth largest exporter of electricity. It currently faces a fundamental decision on a new orientation of its energy strategy. Current electricity generation is based on coal (54.7%) and nuclear energy (32.7%). Nowadays the lifespan of the recoverabe reserves is less than 20 years in case of sub-bituminous coal and less than 2 years in case of uranium. Also the original lifespan of all 4 blocks of the power station Dukovany, one of county's two nuclear power plants, is approaching. These are the main reason why the Czech Republic is forced to revise its future energy strategy as well as its current optimal energy mix. This paper analyses the role of individual energy minerals in the future electricity generation portfolio of the Czech Republic. From the point of the energy security, it seems to be optimal to increase the availability of domestic sub-bituminous coal and continue with the preparation of new nuclear energy blocks and extending the lifespan of existing ones. These actions should be supported by investments to the geological survey of domestic uranium deposits. Impartial evaluation of RES potential and impact of their use on the electricity price is advisable simultaneously. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.


Janikova P.,Ministry of Industry and Trade of the Czech Republic | Stary J.,Czech Geological Survey | Klika R.,Czech Mining Authority | Kavina P.,Ministry of Industry and Trade of the Czech Republic | And 2 more authors.
Gospodarka Surowcami Mineralnymi / Mineral Resources Management | Year: 2015

Gold production in the region that currently makes up the Czech Republic has a thousand-year-old tradition with peaks around the third century BC, 14th century AD and 20th century AD. In general, approximately 100 metric tonnes were produced by the end of mining in 1994, of which nearly 9 tonnes were produced in the 20th century and approximately 3 tonnes were produced after World War II. Significant gold deposits were discovered during the last extensive exploration conducted in the 1970s to 1995, motivated by the sharp rise in the price of gold at the beginning of the 1970s and in the 1980s. Fifteen deposits with 239 tonnes of geological resources of gold were registered. Another 112 tonnes are recorded as prognosticated resources. None of these deposits are mined, due to unresolved issues involving environmental protection. The exploitation of these deposits is restricted primarily due to concerns regarding the environmental impacts of the mining and processing of extracted minerals. A key aspect of these restrictions is likely the existing ban on the use of cyanide mining technologies. A new and yet-to-be-approved proposal for an updated mineral policy in the Czech Republic is attempting to gradually change this stance. Yet another problem lies in the unfinished surveys of mineral deposits, which would specify the total amount of gold and upgrade the resources to higher categories concerning the level of exploration. Without these, it is impossible to prepare the necessary economic assessments of potential production and of the deposits to the fullest extent of activities involving exploration, mineral extraction and processing, including subsequent reclamation of affected areas, elimination of mining impacts and regeneration of post-mining landscapes. The future of gold deposits in the Czech Republic also greatly depends on future trends in the price of gold and accompanying (by-product) minerals occurring together with gold in mined ores. © 2015 Polska Akademia Nauk. All rights reserved.

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