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--Texila American University Lusaka, Zambia conducts Seminar for school teachers at its Zambia Campus. The event will be held on 6May 2017.This seminar is on the topic "Current Trends in ICT enabled Teaching Methodologies". The seminar covers topics like Introduction on ICT Tools, Presentation on 21Century pedagogies and strategies, Demonstration on Learning Management system and there will be Open Forum – ICT enabled teaching in Zambian Schools.Date: 6May 2017Venue: PO Box No.: 320110 Kwacha Square, KPTF Building,Stand No.:37605, Lake Road, Lusaka, Zambia.Timing: 10:00 am to 12:00 pmContact Number: +260964426480http://www.tau.edu.zm/Contact Email: sathish.kumar@tau.edu.zmTAU – Zambia has been endorsed by Higher Education Authority - Ministry of Higher Education, Zambia, the grounds is consistently creating and advancing. Their nearness in Lusaka, adds to the city's well-disposed and lively air.TAU is a consortium of Universities and grounds deliberately spread crosswise over nations and landmasses.Established in 2010, Texila American University Group (TAU) has advanced into a standout amongst the most prestigious and world-class global instruction suppliers. With a various understudy base, TAU stands focused on magnificence in the training of future experts over the world. Texila Group – has 4000+ understudies from 70+ Countries for its differed program verticals.


11 Subjects Rank in Top 50 and 52 in Top 100 as Malaysia Continues to Redesign its Higher Education System to Deliver Holistic Graduates KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia, May 3, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Malaysia, ranked the 12th most preferred education destination in the world (UNESCO 2014), continues to improve its global rankings, strengthening its position as an international education hub of quality. "QS World University Rankings by Subject 2017 reveals 11 subjects across 4 universities in Malaysia are ranked within the world's top 50 while 52 subjects are in the world's top 100," said Mohd Yazid Abd Hamid, CEO of Education Malaysia Global Services (EMGS), a company of the Ministry of Higher Education responsible for the global promotion of Malaysia's higher education and international student services. University of Malaya (UM) leads the way with 5 subjects in top 50, achieving a remarkable 23rd in Electronic and Electrical Engineering, 26th in Developmental Studies, 33rd in Mechanical Engineering and 38th in Chemical Engineering. Taylor's University and Universiti Sains Malaysia rank 29th and 32nd respectively for Hospitality and Leisure Management. International Islamic University Malaysia (IIUM) is 46th for Theology, Divinity, and Religious Studies. "Islamic Banking and Finance is also Malaysia's specialisation. INCEIF and IIUM contribute about 11% of the world's research and publications on Islamic Banking," Mohd Yazid added. Malaysia's network of 480 institutions offers over 6,000 programmes at pre-university, undergraduate and postgraduate levels. There are nine international branch campuses of leading British, Australian and Chinese universities in Malaysia with three ranking in world's top 100 -- Monash, Southampton and Nottingham. Studying at these universities in Malaysia translates into a minimum 30% savings on tuition fee when compared to its parent campus. "Costs remains a critical challenge in the global higher education landscape. Malaysia is a practical solution -- we provide quality education with lower tuition fees, lower cost of living which adds to a greater student experience. Kuala Lumpur, for the third consecutive year has been voted the Most Affordable City in the World for Students (QS Best Student Cities Survey 2016)," Mohd Yazid said. Many colleges in Malaysia offer twinning programmes and some offer joint degree programmes with reputable foreign partner universities, allowing students to study in two campuses across two countries and graduate with dual certification from both institutions or a certification from the foreign partner university. "The Higher Education Blueprint (2015-2025) outlines clear strategies in redesigning higher education in Malaysia, focussing on creating holistic graduates -- graduates with knowledge, practical, entrepreneurial, information management, problem-solving, communication and social skills, social responsibility, and strong ethics and values. "With its cultural, religious and geographical proximity, Malaysia is the ideal education destination for Pakistanis who seek quality higher education and a great student experience, especially ideal for postgraduate students -- you can have your dependents and family with you during your study here," Mohd Yazid said. Visit www.educationmalaysia.gov.my or email to enquiry@emgs.com.my for more information.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: INCO.2012-1.3 | Award Amount: 4.48M | Year: 2013

The main aim of the Project is to contribute to the quality of the Euro-Mediterranean research area, with a particular focus on the bi-regional Euro-Mediterranean S&T cooperation, research & innovation, policy dialogue and cooperation monitoring. The proposal aims at tackling the key issues and policy objectives outlined in the Work Programme by creating a dialogue and coordination platform of governmental institutions, research organizations, associations and NGOs helping integrate society in the institutional dialogue. To this end, the Project foresees a comprehensive analysis of selected societal challenges and will address capacity building to increase research capacity, shared knowledge and cooperation. It will also support synergies and networking to strengthen joint activities and EU- MS-MPCs cooperation in EU programmes, as well as a monitoring of regional RTD cooperation and policies. In particular, the proposal is structured to address three societal challenges: energy, high quality affordable food, scarcity of resources. These challenges have been selected on the basis of the result of the long-standing and ongoing EU-MPCs policy dialogue and represent the most significant areas of common interest in current Euro-Mediterranean cooperation. The specific objectives of the Project are thus: enhancing EU-MPCs co-ownership in research cooperation; creating synergies in order to reduce fragmentation of research actions; involving the civil society in the institutional dialogue on research and innovation; developing cooperation instruments to tackle societal challenges with a view to sustainability; supporting research and innovation capacity building through comprehensive training and contributing build an Euro-Mediterranean shared knowledge space in order to develop common EU-MPCs planning capacity and a sustainable regional RDT policy and cooperation.


News Article | November 17, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

ANN ARBOR, Mich. -- It sounds like the plot of a 1950s science fiction movie: normal, helpful bacteria that begin to eat their host from within, because they don't get what they want. But new research shows that's exactly what happens when microbes inside the digestive system don't get the natural fiber that they rely on for food. Starved, they begin to munch on the natural layer of mucus that lines the gut, eroding it to the point where dangerous invading bacteria can infect the colon wall. In a new paper in Cell, an international team of researchers show the impact of fiber deprivation on the guts of specially raised mice. The mice were born and raised with no gut microbes of their own, then received a transplant of 14 bacteria that normally grow in the human gut. Scientists know the full genetic signature of each one, making it possible to track their activity over time. The findings have implications for understanding not only the role of fiber in a normal diet, but also the potential of using fiber to counter the effects of digestive tract disorders. "The lesson we're learning from studying the interaction of fiber, gut microbes and the intestinal barrier system is that if you don't feed them, they can eat you," says Eric Martens, Ph.D., an associate professor of microbiology at the University of Michigan Medical School who led the research along with his former postdoctoral fellow Mahesh Desai, Ph.D., now at the Luxembourg Institute of Health. Using U-M's special gnotobiotic, or germ-free, mouse facility, and advanced genetic techniques that allowed them to determine which bacteria were present and active under different conditions, they studied the impact of diets with different fiber content - and those with no fiber. They also infected some of the mice with a bacterial strain that does to mice what certain strains of Escherichia coli can do to humans - cause gut infections that lead to irritation, inflammation, diarrhea and more. The result: the mucus layer stayed thick, and the infection didn't take full hold, in mice that received a diet that was about 15 percent fiber from minimally processed grains and plants. But when the researchers substituted a diet with no fiber in it, even for a few days, some of the microbes in their guts began to munch on the mucus. They also tried a diet that was rich in prebiotic fiber - purified forms of soluble fiber similar to what some processed foods and supplements currently contain. This diet resulted in the same erosion of the mucus layer as observed in the lack of fiber. The researchers also saw that the mix of bacteria changed depending on what the mice were being fed, even day by day. Some species of bacteria in the transplanted microbiome were more common - meaning they had reproduced more - in low-fiber conditions, others in high-fiber conditions. And the four bacteria strains that flourished most in low-fiber and no-fiber conditions were the only ones that make enzymes that are capable of breaking down the long molecules called glycoproteins that make up the mucus layer. In addition to looking at the of bacteria based on genetic information, the researchers could see which fiber-digesting enzymes the bacteria were making. They detected more than 1,600 different enzymes capable of degrading carbohydrates - similar to the complexity in the normal human gut. Just like the mix of bacteria, the mix of enzymes changed depending on what the mice were being fed, with even occasional fiber deprivation leading to more production of mucus-degrading enzymes. Images of the mucus layer, and the "goblet" cells of the colon wall that produce the mucus constantly, showed the layer was thinner the less fiber the mice received. While mucus is constantly being produced and degraded in a normal gut, the change in bacteria activity under the lowest-fiber conditions meant that the pace of eating was faster than the pace of production - almost like an overzealous harvesting of trees outpacing the planting of new ones. When the researchers infected the mice with Citrobacter rodentium - the E. coli-like bacteria - they observed that these dangerous bacteria flourished more in the guts of mice fed a fiber-free diet. Many of those mice began to show signs of illness and lost weight. When the scientists looked at samples of their gut tissue, they saw not only a much thinner or even patchy mucus later - they also saw inflammation across a wide area. Mice that had received a fiber-rich diet before being infected also had some inflammation but across a much smaller area. Martens notes that in addition to the gnotobiotic facility, the research was possible because of the microbe DNA and RNA sequencing capability built up through the Medical School's Host Microbiome Initiative, as well as the computing capability to plow through all the sequence data. "Having all the resources here was the key to making this work, and the fact that it was all across the street from our lab allowed us to pin it all together," he says. He also notes the role of U-M colleagues led by Gabriel Nunez and Nobuhiko Kamada in providing the C. rodentium pathogen model, and of French collaborators from the Aix-Marseille Université in studying the enzymes in the mouse gut. Going forward, Martens and Desai intend to look at the impact of different prebiotic fiber mixes, and of diets with more intermittent natural fiber content over a longer period. They also want to look for biomarkers that could tell them about the status of the mucus layer in human guts - such as the abundance of mucus-digesting bacteria strains, and the effect of low fiber on chronic disease such as inflammatory bowel disease. "While this work was in mice, the take-home message from this work for humans amplifies everything that doctors and nutritionists have been telling us for decades: Eat a lot of fiber from diverse natural sources," says Martens. "Your diet directly influences your microbiota, and from there it may influence the status of your gut's mucus layer and tendency toward disease. But it's an open question of whether we can cure our cultural lack of fiber with something more purified and easy to ingest than a lot of broccoli." In addition to Martens, Desai, Nunez and Kamada and the French collaborators, the paper's authors are U-M's Anna Seekatz, Nicole Koropatkin, Nicholas Pudlo, Sho Kitamoto and Vincent Young, and colleagues from the Washington University School of Medicine and the Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine and the Luxembourg Institute of Health. The research was funded by the Luxembourg National Research Fund and Luxembourg Ministry of Higher Education and Research; the National Institutes of Health (GM099513) and the U-M Host Microbiome Initiative and Center for Gastrointestinal Research (DK034933).


COPENHAGEN, 28-Nov-2016 — /EuropaWire/ — A new project, ’Water Smart Cities’, is developing software technologies to ensure better planning when cities in the future are hit by heavy rains and floods. Ramboll is involved in this project and contributes in particular with knowledge about decision support and valuation. Development of the new state-of-the-art water technology will give water companies and municipalities a new tool for overall planning and management of water – regardless of whether it comes from torrential rain or flooding. On this basis, a number of public and private stakeholders, together with Denmark’s largest water companies and Innovation Fund Denmark have launched the project, ’Water Smart Cities’. The name, ‘Water Smart Cities’  was chosen, because there will be focus in the future on use of new IT technology as a means of smarter management of water, to prevent harm to the environment and damage to buildings. The name also refers to tackling upcoming climate challenges in the best possible way. ”This project is based on how water moves through a city in event of torrential rainstorms. The trick is to lead the water around buildings and installations that are at risk, and instead to areas where the great quantities of water will cause no harm. There are not many vacant square meters in cities where water can go without doing damage, so all measures must be put to use to control water from cloudbursts,” says Christian Nyerup Nielsen, responsible for climate adaptation at Ramboll and member of the project steering committee. ”That’s why a new form of emergency action is needed, through the interaction between realistic forecasts, careful urban planning, management of drainage and various kinds of retention basins, to lead floodwater out of the cities, and ensure the least possible damage,” he adds. Innovation Fund Denmark, established by the Ministry of Higher Education and Science as an independent body for development of knowledge and technology, has granted DKK 12.1 million to the project, which in total is expected to cost DKK 28.3 million. Need for insight to support decisions Ramboll’s contribution consists mainly of a work package dealing with the development and application of general and transparent criteria, as a basis for decision support during the design and operation of drainage systems. ”Nowadays the possible methods for handling large amounts of water play an important role in the planning both natural and urban development projects. There are often many considerations and interests at stake, and therefore a growing need to make decisions on a clear basis. That’s why a large share of our contribution to the project consists of guidance to a PhD student, who will work with ’decision-support’ in the handling of urban water runoff and economic valuation of costs and benefits,” says Ida Bülow Gregersen from Ramboll, who has a PhD herself and will participate in project meetings. She and Christian Nyerup Nielsen are both pleased that the water sector is working together on a joint project in this area: ”Unlike a traditional research project, where the core research at universities weighs heaviest, the utilities play a major role in the ’Water Smart Cities’ project. The project has allocated many resources to knowledge-exchange across organisations. This means that tools developed during the project directly address the needs of the utilities. Thus, the project has the potential to strengthen both the Danish water sector as a whole and the individual organisation’s role abroad.” The project started in April 2016 and will run for four years. The participating organisations are: the Technical University of Denmark, DHI, Ramboll, Krüger, Danish Meteorological Institute, Greater Copenhagen Utility (HOFOR), Aarhus Water, WaterCenter South, BIOFOS, and Innovation Fund Denmark. You can read more about our services within climate adaptation and flood protection.


El-Shafie A.,National University of Malaysia | Najah A.,University of Malaysia, Terengganu | Alsulami H.M.,Ministry of Higher Education | Jahanbani H.,University of Melbourne
Water Resources Management | Year: 2014

Potential evapotranspiration (ETo) is an essential hydrologic parameter for having better understanding for hydrologic cycle in certain catchment area. In addition, ETo is vital for calculating the agricultural demand. In fact, Penman-Monteith (PM) method is considered as reference method for estimating (ETo), however, this method required a lot of data to be used which is not usually available in many catchment areas. Furthermore, there are several efforts that have been performed as competitor to reach accurate estimation of (ETo) when there is lack of data to utilize (PM) method, but still required numerous research. Recently, methods based on Artificial Intelligence (AI) have been suggested to provide reliable prediction model for several application in engineering and especially for hydrological process. However, time series prediction based on Artificial Neural Network (ANN) learning algorithms is fundamentally difficult and faces problem. One of the major shortcomings is that the ANN model experiences over-fitting problem during training session and also occurs when a neural network loses its generalization. In this research a modification for the classical Multi Layer Preceptron- Artificial Neural Network (MLP-ANN) modeling namely; Ensemble Neural Network (ENN) is proposed and applied for predicting daily ETo. The proposed model applied at two different region with two different climatic conditions, Rasht city located north part of Iran and Johor Bahru City, Johor, Malaysia using maximum and minimum daily temperature collected from 1975 to 2005. The result showed that the ENN outperformed the classical MLP-ANN method and successfully predict daily ETo utilizing maximum and minimum temperature only with satisfactory level of accuracy. In addition, the proposed model could achieve accuracy level better than the traditional competitor methods for ETo. © 2014 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.


News Article | October 5, 2016
Site: www.nature.com

Rosetta rests The European Space Agency’s Rosetta spacecraft successfully crash-landed on the comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko on 30 September, in a daring finale to its 12-year mission. The craft sent back a continuous stream of data as it descended 19 kilometres to the comet’s surface. The move was designed to get scientists the closest possible images and measurements of dust, gas and plasma from a comet. See page 13 for more. UN space ambition The United Nations will launch its first space mission in 2021, aiming to give developing nations an opportunity to conduct space research. The UN Office for Outer Space Affairs (UNOOSA) announced on 27 September at an aeronautics congress in Mexico that it will put a payload on the Dream Chaser spacecraft being developed by the Sierra Nevada Corporation in Sparks, Nevada. UNOOSA said that it will soon start soliciting proposals for payloads to be launched into low-Earth orbit. It aims to select a mission by early 2018. Russia suspends plutonium deal with US On 3 October, Russian President Vladimir Putin suspended an agreement with the United States that requires each country to dispose of 34 tonnes of weapons-grade plutonium, citing “unfriendly” US actions. Under the 2000 deal, which was reaffirmed in 2010, both countries committed to blending the plutonium into mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel for use in nuclear power plants. Delays and cost overruns at a MOX fuel-fabrication facility at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina, however, prompted the US Department of Energy (DOE) to abandon the idea. Instead, the DOE is proposing to dilute and dispose of the plutonium directly. But Russia had opposed that option, claiming that the plutonium could eventually be recovered. Climate deal sealed The European Union’s parliament voted to ratify the 2015 Paris climate deal on 4 October, securing enough backing for the agreement to enter into force. The accord needed the support of 55 nations covering 55% of global greenhouse-gas emissions to do so. The European Union accounts for 12% of global emissions. India (responsible for 4% of emissions) ratified the deal on 2 October. Signed last December in Paris by nearly 200 nations, the accord commits countries to keeping global warming to “well below” 2 °C. French budget With one eye on next year’s elections, the French government has proposed a generous boost for its Ministry of Higher Education and Research in the draft budget for 2017, released on 28 September. The ministry would get a 3.7% spending hike, bringing its total budget to €23.85 billion (US$27 billion) and its research pot to €7.9 billion. It is the largest increase for 15 years, but some fear that already-promised salary raises for civil servants — including many researchers and university teaching staff — could swallow up much of the increased budget. Wildlife protection In a significant step, delegates at the meeting of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) in Johannesburg, South Africa, agreed on a motion calling for the closure of all domestic ivory markets. Japan, however, has said the non-binding motion won’t apply there. But the congress rejected proposals to give African elephants the highest level of protection available. Other actions at the 12-day meeting, which closed on 5 October, included banning all trade of pangolins, which are used in Chinese medicine and are some of the world’s most trafficked mammals; and boosting protection for thresher sharks, known for their long, whip-like tails. Laser launch The world’s most powerful X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL), in Hamburg, Germany, will officially launch on 6 October. The €1.2-billion (US$1.3-billion) European XFEL, funded by 11 countries, is entering its test phase. When fully operational, it will accelerate bunches of free electrons to near the speed of light, generating X-ray radiation at 27,000 pulses per second. Scientists will use the radiation to study complex molecules and chemical reactions in unprecedented detail. The facility’s 1.7-kilometre superconducting linear accelerator was installed in an underground tunnel last month. If tests go to plan, researchers will be able to apply for instrument time starting next year. Nobel prizes Molecular biologist Yoshinori Ohsumi won the 2016 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his work in the field of autophagy: the processes by which the cell digests and recycles its own components. The physics prize was awarded to David Thouless, Duncan Haldane and Michael Kosterlitz for discoveries of exotic behaviour in matter, and for using the mathematics of topology to explain the phenomena. A member of the Nobel physics committee used a bagel and pretzel to aid his explanation of the work. Nature went to press before the chemistry prize was awarded, but full details are available at go.nature.com/2dnp5bb. ‘Three-parent’ baby A potential world first in fertility therapy — a baby boy conceived using a controversial mitochondrial-replacement technique that mixes DNA from three people — was reported by New Scientist on 27 September. The method, called spindle nuclear transfer, moves the nucleus of an egg cell from a mother with faulty mitochondria to the nucleus-free egg of a healthy donor; this is then fertilized with the father’s sperm. The procedure was carried out in Mexico by a team from a US clinic, on behalf of a Jordanian couple. The mother of the baby carries a neurological disease called Leigh’s syndrome. But with only sparse information available, the claim has not been verified, and some researchers have questioned the ethics of the procedure. The team, led by John Zhang (pictured, with baby), is scheduled to present details on 19 October. The boy was born in April. See go.nature.com/2dphaud for more. Artificial pancreas US regulators have approved the first ‘artificial pancreas’ — a device that automatically adjusts insulin levels on the basis of blood-sugar levels. The US Food and Drug Administration approved the device, which is made by Medtronic of Dublin, on 28 September to treat type 1 diabetes. The artificial pancreas measures blood sugar every five minutes and relies on an insulin pump to adjust insulin levels accordingly. Arctic science Nations have made a joint pledge to improve collaboration on Arctic research. Science ministers and advisers from more than 20 nations and the European Union, plus representatives from indigenous groups, met at the White House on 28 September for the first Arctic-science ministerial meeting to discuss the rapidly changing polar environment. In a joint statement, the ministers announced several projects, including a five-year drive to create an Arctic observation system, led by Norway; an EU-led project on the Arctic’s impacts on Northern Hemisphere weather; and a US-led research network that will harness the power of citizen scientists. AI super-league Tech giants Google, Facebook, Amazon, IBM and Microsoft will join forces to create an artificial-intelligence (AI) consortium to promote public understanding of the field. The Partnership on Artificial Intelligence to Benefit People and Society, announced on 28 September, will recommend best practices, consult with academics on how AI might affect society, and propose standards for future AI researchers. But two big names are so far conspicuously absent from the group: Apple and Elon Musk’s research-focused company OpenAI. Entangled whales Two North Atlantic right whales (Eubalaena glacialis) were found dead and a third became entangled in fishing gear off the coasts of Maine and Massachusetts between 22 and 24 September. The species, which is endangered, has a population of about 500 in the region. Officials with the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration removed buoys and more than 60 metres of rope from the entangled whale, an 8-year-old female, before she became uncooperative. A necropsy of one of the dead whales revealed that it had died of stress after being entangled in fishing gear. SpaceX head Elon Musk has unveiled a plan to colonize Mars. In his yet-to-be-built Interplanetary Transport System, a spaceship designed to carry at least 100 people would be mounted on the most powerful rocket ever built. Both elements are intended to be reusable. After launch, the rocket booster separates in orbit and lands back on Earth. The spaceship, parked in orbit, waits for the booster to return and refuel it with methane and oxygen. Once fully fuelled, the spaceship heads to Mars.


News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Two of Oakland Zoo’s Education staff are now in Madagascar as part of a three-year program developing conservation-based educational curriculum for grade school students in the country’s remote and impoverished villages. Daniel Flynn and Betty Vilallta of Oakland Zoo, along with representatives from Centre ValBio, Madagascar Ministry of Basic Education, Madagascar Ministry of Higher Education, University of Fianarantsoa, Stony Brook University in New York, and local Malagasy teachers and village leaders have teamed together to develop and launch a new educational curriculum aimed to inspire and empower young girls and boys in impoverished and remote villages of Madagascar. Centre ValBio, a conservation partner to Oakland Zoo dedicated to lemur research and conservation in Madagascar, approached the Zoo’s Education Department in 2015 about the program, and for the second year in a row the Zoo has sent two education specialist staff to be part of the “brain trust” tasked in developing and carrying out conservation-focused, locally relevant curriculum and education aids used in the new alternative method in teaching and learning, titled “My Rainforest, My World.” The project, funded by a three-year grant from Three Graces Foundation, is intended to help the children learn more effectively in science and to develop critical thinking skills - encouraging them to continue their education into middle school and beyond. Currently, the average age of girls and boys opting out of formal education in Madagascar is 4th grade and younger, with some as young as 13 marrying and starting families of their own. Since the program’s launch last year, the number of participating schools has doubled from ten to twenty. The schools are located in very rural farming communities, with little to no classroom resources, most of the program schools have no running water or electricity. Upon arriving in Madagascar, Oakland Zoo’s educators delivered 200 pounds of classroom supplies and $700 donated by Zoo staff, Bay Area schools and businesses to the participating schools. Oakland Zoo is also auctioning off a behind-the-scenes experience with lemurs, native to Madagascar, to raise much needed funds for the purchase of additional school supplies. In addition to developing curriculum and educational aids in collaboration with Centre ValBio, located in Southeastern Madagascar, the project hopes to expand the frontiers of knowledge while safeguarding biodiversity for future generations. A key component of the project involves recruiting and training student teacher interns to aid in the classrooms. These interns will help administer and teach the new curriculum in the schools under the direction and guidance of Centre ValBio and Oakland Zoo; and students will be taught hands-on science through the Zoo’s participatory educational models and theories which they can then use when they graduate. This effort marks the third hands-on collaboration between Oakland Zoo and Centre ValBio. Last year, zookeepers Margaret Rousser and Elizabeth Abram travelled to Madagascar to assist in the capture and data collection of the park’s Milne-Edward sifaka’s (lemurs, which are critically endangered). Oakland Zoo is thrilled to work on yet another project in Madagascar that directly benefits the local people and native wildlife. The Bay Area's award-winning Oakland Zoo is home to more than 660 native and exotic animals. The Zoo offers many educational programs and kid's activities perfect for science field trips, family day trips and exciting birthday parties. Oakland Zoo is dedicated to the humane treatment of animals and wildlife conservation onsite and worldwide; with 25¢ from each ticket donated to support conservation partners and programs around the world. The California Trail, a transformational project that more than doubles our size, opens in 2018, and will further our commitment to animal care, education, and conservation with a focus on this state’s remarkable native wildlife. Nestled in the Oakland Hills, in 500-acre Knowland Park, the Zoo is located at 9777 Golf Links Road, off Highway 580. The East Bay Zoological Society (Oakland Zoo) is a nonprofit 501(c)3 organization supported in part by members, contributions, the City of Oakland and the East Bay Regional Parks. For more information, go to: http://www.oaklandzoo.org Centre ValBio was created by Professor Patricia Wright in 2003 to help both indigenous people and the international community better understand the value of conservation in Madagascar and around the world. CVB’s mission has three main objectives, which are: to promote world-class research in one of the world’s most biologically diverse and unique ecosystems; to encourage environmental conservation by developing ecologically sustainable economic development programs with local villages; to provide the local villagers with the knowledge and tools to improve their quality of life through projects focused on sanitation, diet, and education, and ultimately reduce poverty in the area.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: cen.acs.org

A chemistry professor was among six people killed during a shooting on Sunday at a Quebec City mosque. Khaled Belkacemi, 60, was a professor in the Faculty of Agricultural & Food Sciences at Laval University in Quebec City. “He was a cultured and passionate man and very involved within the Faculty,” says Jean-Claude Dufour, dean of the Faculty of Agriculture & Food Sciences at Laval University. “His remarkable contributions will endure despite his sudden passing, which deeply saddens us all.” Belkacemi’s research focused on the use of heterogeneous catalysis in food chemistry and in the conversion of biomass and food waste. He earned an M.Sc. in chemical engineering from the Université de Sherbrooke in 1986. He went on to earn a Ph.D. from the same university in 1990. He also earned a Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the Algerian Ministry of Higher Education in 1995. “He firmly believed that his work in food engineering should result in concrete applications for the industry,” says Sylvie Turgeon, director of the Institute of Nutrition and Functional Foods, of which Belkacemi was a faculty member. “All those who knew him will remember him as an eminent researcher, but also as a man of great kindness.” Belkacemi was also a member of the Center for Green Chemistry and Catalysis in Quebec. “We are deeply shocked by this vicious attack and saddened for the loss of a great colleague,” say Andre Charette and Chao-Jun Li, codirectors of the Center for Green Chemistry and Catalysis, in a joint statement to C&EN. “Professor Khaled Belkacemi provided valuable contributions on the subject of heterogeneous catalysis for the conversion of renewable biomass into high-valued chemical products, and he was a very cheerful and supportive member of the center.” “Khaled believed a lot in green chemistry,” says Paul Angers, a professor at the Food Sciences Department. “He developed catalysts to do chemical transformation on molecules of dairy transformation residues, for example. He then modified those molecules into polymers that would be turned into biodegradable plastic.” Belkacemi, who immigrated to Canada from Algeria, is survived by his wife, Safia Hamoudi, who is also a professor of the Faculty of Agricultural & Food Sciences at Laval University, and their three children. On Facebook, his son, Amir Belkacemi, wrote that his father “left his country to give a chance to his family to live far away from the horror.”


News Article | November 28, 2016
Site: www.PR.com

Hamburg, Germany, November 28, 2016 --( The 3-month long negotiation concluded today in Hamburg, Germany between both sides. Mr. Nourden conveyed his full interest and rights in Hayat University over to Mr. Salhi. In a ceremony for acquisition contract signing, Mr. Nourden stated, "There were three final offers and interests on acquiring Hayat University, and it was not an easy decision. However, I have decided to accept Mr. Salhi offer because I felt sincerely that his aim was not pure financial gain, but rather he was interested in building the University and providing international level education to many generations in Kurdistan, this was my dream and I feel Mr. Salhi will carry on this dream to next level, I feel Mr. Salhi was right choice and I wish him and his team best of luck." In his remarks, Mr. Salhi said: “I understand Hayat University faces some challenges. Mismanagement and absence of professional administration caused the university to fall behind on its mission and obligations affecting the reputation and standing of the university. However, I am ready to take on these challenges and turn Hayat University into one of the top universities in Kurdistan and Iraq. My team will work very closely with KRG Ministry of Higher Education, I will raise necessary capital to immediately settle all of Hayat obligation and requirements, restructure the management, and I will hire a team of experts to help us manage the University as world class university. Managing and running a university solely for a business gain in my opinion may not be a correct approach, providing high quality education service shall be first goal, the business gain will be secondary. This is how Hayat can be turned to highly respected and successful University in Kurdistan.” Mr. Salhi has assembled temporary administration team (TAT) that includes local and foreign professional experts. TAT is scheduled to start the takeover of the University on Saturday, November 25, and continue to assess the current conditions of the University. Among other tasks, TAT is to prepare a full report within two weeks, identifying the University administration and management weaknesses and deficiencies and recommending measures that would lead the University to perform well and to meet its financial obligations on schedule. Hayat University is founded in 2008 in accordance with Kurdistan Legislation No. 10 and KRG Council of Ministers’ decree No. 2452. Hayat University is one of the 12 licensed private universities in Kurdistan, Hayat Uni consist of five colleges and 11 departments, it has student body of over 3000, with a faculty of 150 members. Hayat University Campus located on 400 Donim/Acres with building facilities can accommodate to 6000 students, Hayat Uni has is license to establish medical college and learning hospital, Hayat located near Kirkuk Road in Erbil city the KRG Capital. Hayat University Press Room HayatUni.press@gmail.com Hamburg, Germany, November 28, 2016 --( PR.com )-- The acquisition of Hayat University was completed today between its founder and owner, Mr. Najief A Nouraden and Mr. Waria Salhi, an investor and chairman and founder of Al-Aman Finance.The 3-month long negotiation concluded today in Hamburg, Germany between both sides. Mr. Nourden conveyed his full interest and rights in Hayat University over to Mr. Salhi.In a ceremony for acquisition contract signing, Mr. Nourden stated, "There were three final offers and interests on acquiring Hayat University, and it was not an easy decision. However, I have decided to accept Mr. Salhi offer because I felt sincerely that his aim was not pure financial gain, but rather he was interested in building the University and providing international level education to many generations in Kurdistan, this was my dream and I feel Mr. Salhi will carry on this dream to next level, I feel Mr. Salhi was right choice and I wish him and his team best of luck."In his remarks, Mr. Salhi said: “I understand Hayat University faces some challenges. Mismanagement and absence of professional administration caused the university to fall behind on its mission and obligations affecting the reputation and standing of the university. However, I am ready to take on these challenges and turn Hayat University into one of the top universities in Kurdistan and Iraq. My team will work very closely with KRG Ministry of Higher Education, I will raise necessary capital to immediately settle all of Hayat obligation and requirements, restructure the management, and I will hire a team of experts to help us manage the University as world class university. Managing and running a university solely for a business gain in my opinion may not be a correct approach, providing high quality education service shall be first goal, the business gain will be secondary. This is how Hayat can be turned to highly respected and successful University in Kurdistan.”Mr. Salhi has assembled temporary administration team (TAT) that includes local and foreign professional experts. TAT is scheduled to start the takeover of the University on Saturday, November 25, and continue to assess the current conditions of the University. Among other tasks, TAT is to prepare a full report within two weeks, identifying the University administration and management weaknesses and deficiencies and recommending measures that would lead the University to perform well and to meet its financial obligations on schedule.Hayat University is founded in 2008 in accordance with Kurdistan Legislation No. 10 and KRG Council of Ministers’ decree No. 2452. Hayat University is one of the 12 licensed private universities in Kurdistan, Hayat Uni consist of five colleges and 11 departments, it has student body of over 3000, with a faculty of 150 members. Hayat University Campus located on 400 Donim/Acres with building facilities can accommodate to 6000 students, Hayat Uni has is license to establish medical college and learning hospital, Hayat located near Kirkuk Road in Erbil city the KRG Capital.Hayat University Press Room Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from Waria Salhi

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