Quebec Ministry of Health and Social Services

Québec, Canada

Quebec Ministry of Health and Social Services

Québec, Canada

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Menear M.,Chu Of Quebec Research Center | Menear M.,Laval University | Gervais M.,CIUSSS de la Capitale Nationale | Careau E.,Laval University | And 19 more authors.
BMJ Open | Year: 2016

Introduction: Collaborative mental healthcare (CMHC) has garnered worldwide interest as an effective, teambased approach to managing common mental disorders in primary care. However, questions remain about how CMHC works and why it works in some circumstances but not others. In this study, we will review the evidence on one understudied but potentially critical component of CMHC, namely the engagement of patients and families in care. Our aims are to describe the strategies used to engage people with depression or anxiety disorders and their families in CMHC and understand how these strategies work, for whom and in what circumstances. Methods and analysis: We are conducting a review with systematic and realist review components. Review part 1 seeks to identify and describe the patient and family engagement strategies featured in CMHC interventions based on systematic searches and descriptive analysis of these interventions. We will use a 2012 Cochrane review of CMHC as a starting point and perform new searches in multiple databases and trial registers to retrieve more recent CMHC intervention studies. In review part 2, we will build and refine programme theories for each of these engagement strategies. Initial theory building will proceed iteratively through content expert consultations, electronic searches for theoretical literature and review team brainstorming sessions. Cluster searches will then retrieve additional data on contexts, mechanisms and outcomes associated with engagement strategies, and pairs of review authors will analyse and synthesise the evidence and adjust initial programme theories. Ethics and dissemination: Our review follows a participatory approach with multiple knowledge users and persons with lived experience of mental illness. These partners will help us develop and tailor project outputs, including publications, policy briefs, training materials and guidance on how to make CMHC more patient-centred and family-centred.


PubMed | CIUSSS de la Capitale Nationale, University of Manchester, University of Colorado at Denver, Association quebecoise pour la readaptation psychosociale and 10 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: BMJ open | Year: 2016

Collaborative mental healthcare (CMHC) has garnered worldwide interest as an effective, team-based approach to managing common mental disorders in primary care. However, questions remain about how CMHC works and why it works in some circumstances but not others. In this study, we will review the evidence on one understudied but potentially critical component of CMHC, namely the engagement of patients and families in care. Our aims are to describe the strategies used to engage people with depression or anxiety disorders and their families in CMHC and understand how these strategies work, for whom and in what circumstances.We are conducting a review with systematic and realist review components. Review part 1 seeks to identify and describe the patient and family engagement strategies featured in CMHC interventions based on systematic searches and descriptive analysis of these interventions. We will use a 2012 Cochrane review of CMHC as a starting point and perform new searches in multiple databases and trial registers to retrieve more recent CMHC intervention studies. In review part 2, we will build and refine programme theories for each of these engagement strategies. Initial theory building will proceed iteratively through content expert consultations, electronic searches for theoretical literature and review team brainstorming sessions. Cluster searches will then retrieve additional data on contexts, mechanisms and outcomes associated with engagement strategies, and pairs of review authors will analyse and synthesise the evidence and adjust initial programme theories.Our review follows a participatory approach with multiple knowledge users and persons with lived experience of mental illness. These partners will help us develop and tailor project outputs, including publications, policy briefs, training materials and guidance on how to make CMHC more patient-centred and family-centred.CRD42015025522.


Dube E.,Quebec Institute of Public HealthQuebec | Dube E.,of Quebec Research CenterQuebec | Dube E.,Laval University | Gagnon D.,Quebec Institute of Public HealthQuebec | And 4 more authors.
Human Vaccines and Immunotherapeutics | Year: 2015

A live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) was offered during the 2012-13 influenza season in Quebec, Canada, to children aged between 2 and 17 years with chronic medical conditions. Despite the offer, uptake of the vaccine was low. We assessed the perceptions and opinions about seasonal influenza vaccination and LAIV use among vaccine providers who participated in the 2012-13 campaign. More than 70% of them thought that LAIV was safe and effective and more than 90% considered that the vaccine was well-received by parents and healthcare professionals. According to respondents, the most frequent concerns of parents about LAIV were linked to vaccine efficacy. LAIV is well-accepted by vaccine providers involved in influenza vaccination clinics, but more information about the vaccine and the recommendations for its use are needed to increase vaccine uptake. © 2015 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.


De Wals P.,Laval University | De Wals P.,Quebec National Public Health Institute Institute National Of Sante Publique Du Quebec | De Wals P.,University of Québec | Lefebvre B.,Quebec National Public Health Institute Institute National Of Sante Publique Du Quebec | And 5 more authors.
Vaccine | Year: 2014

Background: Quebec was the first jurisdiction in the world to recommend a 3-dose (2. +. 1) pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) schedule. The program was implemented in December 2004 with a catch-up for children <5 years. PCV-7 was first used and replaced, respectively, by PCV-10 in 2009 and by PCV-13 in 2011. Methods: Cases of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) notified to public health authorities and isolates submitted to the provincial reference laboratory during the period 2000-2011 were analyzed. Results: IPD incidence in children <5 years was 67/100,000 in 2001-2004, and decreased to 32/100,000 in 2007-2009 following PCV-7 implementation (p< 0.01). A further decrease to 24/100,000 was observed in 2010-2011 following PCV-10 introduction (p< 0.01). PCV-7 serotypes represented 82% of the total IPD cases in 2000-2004 and elimination was achieved in 2011. Main emerging serotypes were 19A and 7F. Children exposed to the PCV-10 experienced lower IPD rates and all serotypes contributed to the decline, mainly 7F and 19A. In adults, a decrease of low magnitude was observed in 2005-2006 but rates in 2007-2009 were higher than in the prevaccination period. Conclusions: A 3-dose PCV schedule with high uptake is highly effective and should be recommended worldwide. Serotype replacement eroded benefits especially in adults. PCV-10 introduction had an effect and the impact of PCV-13 use remains to be evaluated. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

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