Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for Bio resource and Eco environment

Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for Bio resource and Eco environment


Time filter

Source Type

Zhang D.-W.,Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for Bio Resource and Eco Environment | Xu F.,Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for Bio Resource and Eco Environment | Zhang Z.-W.,Sichuan University | Chen Y.-E.,Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for Bio Resource and Eco Environment | And 4 more authors.
Plant, Cell and Environment | Year: 2010

Mitochondrial alternative oxidase (AOX), the unique respiratory terminal oxidase in plants, catalyzes the energy wasteful cyanide (CN)-resistant respiration and plays a role in optimizing photosynthesis. Although it has been demonstrated that leaf AOX is upregulated after illumination, the in vivo mechanism of AOX upregulation by light and its physiological significance are still unknown. In this report, red light and blue light-induced AOX (especially AOX1a) expressions were characterized. Phytochromes, phototropins and cryptochromes, all these photoreceptors mediate the light-response of AOX1a gene. When aox1a mutant seedlings were grown under a high-light (HL) condition, photobleaching was more evident in the mutant than the wild-type plants. More reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation and inefficient dissipation of chloroplast reducing-equivalents in aox1a mutant may account for its worse adaptation to HL stress. When etiolated seedlings were exposed to illumination for 4 h, chlorophyll accumulation was largely delayed in aox1a plants. We first suggest that more reduction of the photosynthetic electron transport chain and more accumulation of reducing-equivalents in the mutant during de-etiolation might be the main reasons. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.


Tang X.,Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for Bio resource and Eco environment | Liu J.,Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for Bio resource and Eco environment | Huang S.,Hefei University of Technology | Shi W.,Hefei University of Technology | And 5 more authors.
Plant Signaling and Behavior | Year: 2012

Epigenetic regulation participates broadly in many fundamentally cellular and physiological processes. In this study, we found that DDB1, a protein originally identified as a factor involved in DNA repairing, plays important roles in regulating organ size, growth habit and photosynthesis in tomato via an epigenetic manner. We generated transgenic tomato plants overexpressing an alternatively spliced DDB1 transcript (DDB1F, prevalently present in tomato tissues) and found the primary transformants displayed small-fruited "cherry tomato" in companion with strikingly enhanced shoot branching and biomass, dark-green leaves with elevated chlorophyll accumulation, and increased soluble solids in fruits. Significantly, these phenotypic alterations did not segregate with the DDB1F transgene in subsequent generations, suggesting that the effect of DDB1F on multiple agronomic traits is implemented via an epigenetic manner and is inheritable over generations. We speculate that DDB1, as a core subunit in the recently identified CUL4-based E3 ligase complex, mediates the 26S proteasome-dependent degradation of a large number of proteins, some of which might be required for perpetuating epigenetic marks on chromatins. © 2012 Landes Bioscience.

Loading Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for Bio resource and Eco environment collaborators
Loading Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for Bio resource and Eco environment collaborators