Ministry of Agriculture Forestry and Fisheries

Castries, Saint Lucia

Ministry of Agriculture Forestry and Fisheries

Castries, Saint Lucia

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Yoshida H.,Japan National Research Institute of Fisheries And Environment of Inland Sea | Compton J.,Ministry of Agriculture Forestry and Fisheries | Punnett S.,Ministry of Agriculture Lands and Fisheries | Lovell T.,Ministry of Agriculture Lands and Fisheries | And 6 more authors.
Aquatic Mammals | Year: 2010

A cetacean line-transect survey was conducted in the eastern Caribbean Sea and the adjacent southwestern North Atlantic Ocean from 17 April to 14 May 2004 to obtain information on cetacean distribution and density. The survey area was divided into coastal and offshore blocks; the coastal blocks contained the insular continental shelf. A total of 2,273 nmi (4,210 km) was searched (1,528 nmi [2,830 km] in coastal blocks and 745 nmi [1,380 km] in offshore blocks) with 76 cetacean sightings (64 and 12 for the coastal and offshore blocks, respectively). Twelve species were identified (number of individuals/groups observed in coastal blocks-offshore blocks): 4/4(2/2) Bryde's whale (Balaenoptera edeni), 7/5(2/1) humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae), 5/5(0/0) sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus), 32/3(0/0) short-finned pilot whale (Globicephala macrorhynchus), 132/4(0/0) melon-headed whale (Peponocephala electra), 1/1(0/0) Risso's dolphin (Grampus griseus), 42/6(0/0) bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus), 30/1(0/0) Fraser's dolphin (Lagenodelphis hosei), 505/9(33/3) pantropical spotted dolphin (Stenella attenuata), 35/1(35/1) Atlantic spotted dolphin (S. frontalis), 35/1(0/0) spinner dolphin (S. longirostris), and 90/1(0/0) striped dolphin (S. coeruleoalba). Additionally, 28 groups were sighted for which the species could not be identified: 5/5(2/2) large whales, 11/5(0/0) Mesoplodon spp., 1/1(0/0) ziphiid whale, 5/1(0/0) Stenella spp., and 39/11(10/3) dolphins. Due to the low number of sightings on account of the poor sighting conditions during the survey, abun dance of cetaceans could not be estimated.


Takagi A.P.,University of Tokyo | Ishikawa S.,Tokai University | Nao T.,Ministry of Agriculture Forestry and Fisheries | Song S.L.,Ministry of Agriculture Forestry and Fisheries | And 6 more authors.
Journal of Applied Ichthyology | Year: 2011

This study investigated the genetic variation in the Mastacembelidae fish Macrognathus siamensis by sequencing 1047bp of the mitochondrial ND2 gene of 48 fish samples collected in the Mekong River. They were divided into 15 mtDNA haplotypes. The haplotype network and Bayesian tree revealed striking genetic differences between the Laos and Cambodian samples. The high pairwise F statistic values (0.93-0.97) also confirmed this genetic differentiation. Analysis of the molecular clock indicated that these two samples separated approximately four million years ago. Most likely, the genetic variation was influenced by immigration and isolation events as well as by environmental factors. Furthermore, the present study results could be valuable in identifying the conservation and resource management units of this species. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag, Berlin.


Takagi A.P.,University of Tokyo | Ishikawa S.,Tokai University | Nao T.,Ministry of Agriculture Forestry and Fisheries | Song S.L.,Ministry of Agriculture Forestry and Fisheries | And 6 more authors.
Biological Journal of the Linnean Society | Year: 2010

Mitochondrial DNA analysis was used to investigate genetic variation in the bronze featherback fish Notopterus notopterus in Indochina. Five hundred and five fish samples collected from 11 localities were separated into three genetically differentiated intraspecific groups. Chao Phraya River samples formed a distinct group. Mekong River samples were clearly separated into two different groups, namely, middle and lower Mekong groups. The lower Mekong group was closely related to Malay Peninsula group, even though the two groups are separated by a tract of ocean. F-values (0.82-0.95) also confirmed genetic differentiation of the middle and lower Mekong groups. Although the two Mekong groups inhabit the same river basin, molecular clock calculations indicate they separated approximately 1.2 Mya, suggesting (1) evolutionary divergence before invasion of the Mekong River; (2) differences in migration routes to the river; and/or (3) differences in the timings of invasion. The complexities of historical events cannot be ignored in determinations of factors responsible for the exceptional biodiversity in the Mekong basin. © 2010 The Linnean Society of London, Biological Journal of the Linnean Society.

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