Ministry for the Environment

Athens, Greece

Ministry for the Environment

Athens, Greece
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Stephens P.R.,Ministry for the Environment | Kimberley M.O.,New Zealand Forest Research Institute | Beets P.N.,New Zealand Forest Research Institute | Paul T.S.H.,New Zealand Forest Research Institute | And 4 more authors.
Remote Sensing of Environment | Year: 2012

To meet Kyoto Protocol obligations, New Zealand is required to estimate forest carbon stock change over the first commitment period (2008-2012). New Zealand has three subcategories of forest, namely: Natural forest; Pre-1990 forest; and Post-1989 forest. The Post-1989 forest carbon inventory undertaken in 2008 used discrete return airborne LiDAR and ground-based measurements of 0.06. ha circular plots located on a 4-km × 4-km grid. The national carbon stock estimate was based on a double sampling scheme consisting of 246 plots from which both ground and LiDAR data were obtained, supplemented with 46 additional plots assessed using only LiDAR. This paper describes the relationships established between carbon stocks estimated using ground-based measurements and LiDAR metrics. A regression model explaining 74% of the variation in total carbon was developed using LiDAR 30th percentile height (P30ht) and canopy cover (%Cover). The regression estimator improved the precision of the national carbon stock estimate in 2008 by 6% compared to the ground-based estimate. This inventory indicates that it is possible to reduce the cost of obtaining carbon stock estimates to a specified level of precision using a combination of ground-based and LiDAR measurements in a double sampling approach. The theoretical maximum improvement in precision expected in 2012, when additional LiDAR data are expected to be available, is 50-55%. © 2011.


News Article | December 21, 2016
Site: www.nanotech-now.com

Abstract: Nanotechnology offers many chances to benefit the environment and health. It can be applied to save raw materials and energy, develop enhanced solar cells and more efficient rechargeable batteries and replace harmful substances with eco-compatible solutions. "Nanotechnology is a seminal technology. The UMWELTnanoTECH project association has delivered excellent results. Even the smallest achievements can make a huge contribution to protecting the environment. We must treat the opportunities this future technology offers with responsibility; its eco-compatible use has top priority," said the Bavarian Minister of the Environment, Ulrike Scharf, in Erlangen on 23 November 2016 where the results were presented at the international congress "Next Generation Solar Energy Meets Nanotechnology". For three years, the Bavarian State Ministry for the Environment and Consumer Protection had financed the association consisting of ten individual projects with around three million euros. Three Würzburg projects Three of the ten projects were located in Würzburg. Professor Vladimir Dyakonov from the Department of Physics headed the project for environmentally compatible, highly efficient organic solar cells; he was also the spokesman of the "Organic Photovoltaics" section. Anke Krüger, Professor of Chemistry, was in charge of the project on ultra-fast electrical stores based on nano-diamond composites. Responsibility for the third project rested with Professor Gerhard Sextl, Head of the Fraunhofer Institute for Silicate Research titled "Hybrid capacitors for smart grids and regenerative energy technologies". Sextl, who holds the Chair for Chemical Technology of Material Synthesis at the Julius-Maximilians-Universität (JMU) Würzburg, was also the spokesman of the "Energy storage" section. Below are the three projects from Würzburg and their results. Eco-friendly inks for organic solar cells Organic solar cells have become quite efficient, converting about eleven percent of the solar energy received into electricity. What is more, they are relatively easy to manufacture using ink-jet printing processes where organic nanoparticles are deposited on non-elastic or flexible carrier materials with the help of solvents. This enables new applications in architecture, for example integrating solar cells in window façades or cladding concave surfaces. There is, however, a catch to it: So far, most ink-jet printing processes have been based on toxic solvents such as dichlorobenzene. These substances are harmful for humans and the environment and require extensive and costly standards of safety. The Professors Vladimir Dyakonov and Christoph Brabec (University of Erlangen-Nuremberg) have managed to use nanomaterials to develop ecologically compatible photovoltaic inks based on water or alcohol with equal efficiency. Moreover, the research team has developed new simulation processes: "They allow us to predict which combinations of solvents and materials are suitable for the eco-friendly production of organic solar cells," Dyakonov explains. Nanodiamonds for ultra-fast electrical storage In order to build highly efficient electric cars, more powerful energy stores are needed as the standard batteries still have some drawbacks, including low cycle stability and very limited power density. The first means that the battery capacity decreases following multiple charging and discharging cycles. The latter implies that only a fraction of the energy store is used during fast charging or discharging. Supercapacitors play an important role as highly efficient energy stores besides batteries, because they outperform rechargeable batteries in terms of cycle stability and power density. Their energy density, however, is much lower compared with lithium-ion batteries. This is why supercapacitors need to be much bigger in size than batteries in order to deliver comparable amounts of energy. Professor Anke Krüger has teamed up with Dr Gudrun Reichenauer from the Bavarian Center for Applied Energy Research (ZAE Bayern) to make progress in this regard. Their idea was to build the supercapacitors' electrodes not only of active charcoal, but to modify them using other carbon materials, namely nanodiamonds and carbon onions, which are small particles that have multiple layers like an onion. Their approach is promising: By combining nanomaterials with suitable electrolytes, the performance parameters of the supercapacitors can be boosted. "Based on these findings, it is now possible to build application-oriented energy stores and test their applicability," Krüger further. Increased storage capacity of hybrid capacitors More efficient and faster energy stores were also the research focus of Professor Gerhard Sextl's project. His research team at the University of Würzburg managed to develop so-called hybrid capacitors further into highly efficient energy stores that can be manufactured in an environmentally compatible process. Hybrid capacitors are a combination of supercapacitors based on electrochemical double-layer capacitors and charge storage in a battery. Firstly, they are capable of storing energy quickly by forming an electrochemical double layer as in a supercapacitor and also deliver the energy promptly when it is needed. Secondly, they hold more energy due to lithium ions embedded in an active battery material, analogously to lithium-ion batteries. By combining the two storage mechanisms, it is possible to implement systems with a high energy and power density at low costs. The electrodes are the heart of the hybrid capacitors. They are coated with modified active materials: lithium iron phosphate and lithium titanate. This allows achieving storage capacities which are twice as high as those relying on conventional supercapacitor electrode materials. "We have managed to develop a material that combines the advantages of both systems. This has brought us one step closer to implementing a new, fast and reliable storage concept," Sextl says. The activities at the university were supported by the Fraunhofer Institute for Silicate Research in Würzburg, one of the leading battery research centres in Germany. For more information, please click Contacts: Dr. Esther Knemeyer Pereira 49-931-318-6002 Eco-friendly inks for organic solar cells Prof. Dr. Vladimir Dyakonov Department of Physics University of Würzburg T +49 931 31-83111 Nanodiamonds for ultra-fast electrical storage Prof. Dr. Anke Krueger Institute of Organic Chemistry University of Würzburg T +49 931 31-85334 Increased storage capacity of hybrid capacitors Prof. Dr. Gerhard Sextl Department for Chemical Technology of Material Synthesis University of Würzburg and Fraunhofer Institute for Silicate Research ISC T +49 931 4100-100 If you have a comment, please us. Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.


News Article | December 20, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Nanotechnology offers many chances to benefit the environment and health. It can be applied to save raw materials and energy, develop enhanced solar cells and more efficient rechargeable batteries and replace harmful substances with eco-compatible solutions. "Nanotechnology is a seminal technology. The UMWELTnanoTECH project association has delivered excellent results. Even the smallest achievements can make a huge contribution to protecting the environment. We must treat the opportunities this future technology offers with responsibility; its eco-compatible use has top priority," said the Bavarian Minister of the Environment, Ulrike Scharf, in Erlangen on 23 November 2016 where the results were presented at the international congress "Next Generation Solar Energy Meets Nanotechnology". For three years, the Bavarian State Ministry for the Environment and Consumer Protection had financed the association consisting of ten individual projects with around three million euros. Three of the ten projects were located in Würzburg. Professor Vladimir Dyakonov from the Department of Physics headed the project for environmentally compatible, highly efficient organic solar cells; he was also the spokesman of the "Organic Photovoltaics" section. Anke Krüger, Professor of Chemistry, was in charge of the project on ultra-fast electrical stores based on nano-diamond composites. Responsibility for the third project rested with Professor Gerhard Sextl, Head of the Fraunhofer Institute for Silicate Research titled "Hybrid capacitors for smart grids and regenerative energy technologies". Sextl, who holds the Chair for Chemical Technology of Material Synthesis at the Julius-Maximilians-Universität (JMU) Würzburg, was also the spokesman of the "Energy storage" section. Below are the three projects from Würzburg and their results. Organic solar cells have become quite efficient, converting about eleven percent of the solar energy received into electricity. What is more, they are relatively easy to manufacture using ink-jet printing processes where organic nanoparticles are deposited on non-elastic or flexible carrier materials with the help of solvents. This enables new applications in architecture, for example integrating solar cells in window façades or cladding concave surfaces. There is, however, a catch to it: So far, most ink-jet printing processes have been based on toxic solvents such as dichlorobenzene. These substances are harmful for humans and the environment and require extensive and costly standards of safety. The Professors Vladimir Dyakonov and Christoph Brabec (University of Erlangen-Nuremberg) have managed to use nanomaterials to develop ecologically compatible photovoltaic inks based on water or alcohol with equal efficiency. Moreover, the research team has developed new simulation processes: "They allow us to predict which combinations of solvents and materials are suitable for the eco-friendly production of organic solar cells," Dyakonov explains. To the homepage of Vladimir Dyakonov In order to build highly efficient electric cars, more powerful energy stores are needed as the standard batteries still have some drawbacks, including low cycle stability and very limited power density. The first means that the battery capacity decreases following multiple charging and discharging cycles. The latter implies that only a fraction of the energy store is used during fast charging or discharging. Supercapacitors play an important role as highly efficient energy stores besides batteries, because they outperform rechargeable batteries in terms of cycle stability and power density. Their energy density, however, is much lower compared with lithium-ion batteries. This is why supercapacitors need to be much bigger in size than batteries in order to deliver comparable amounts of energy. Professor Anke Krüger has teamed up with Dr Gudrun Reichenauer from the Bavarian Center for Applied Energy Research (ZAE Bayern) to make progress in this regard. Their idea was to build the supercapacitors' electrodes not only of active charcoal, but to modify them using other carbon materials, namely nanodiamonds and carbon onions, which are small particles that have multiple layers like an onion. Their approach is promising: By combining nanomaterials with suitable electrolytes, the performance parameters of the supercapacitors can be boosted. "Based on these findings, it is now possible to build application-oriented energy stores and test their applicability," Krüger further. To the homepage of Anke Krüger More efficient and faster energy stores were also the research focus of Professor Gerhard Sextl's project. His research team at the University of Würzburg managed to develop so-called hybrid capacitors further into highly efficient energy stores that can be manufactured in an environmentally compatible process. Hybrid capacitors are a combination of supercapacitors based on electrochemical double-layer capacitors and charge storage in a battery. Firstly, they are capable of storing energy quickly by forming an electrochemical double layer as in a supercapacitor and also deliver the energy promptly when it is needed. Secondly, they hold more energy due to lithium ions embedded in an active battery material, analogously to lithium-ion batteries. By combining the two storage mechanisms, it is possible to implement systems with a high energy and power density at low costs. The electrodes are the heart of the hybrid capacitors. They are coated with modified active materials: lithium iron phosphate and lithium titanate. This allows achieving storage capacities which are twice as high as those relying on conventional supercapacitor electrode materials. "We have managed to develop a material that combines the advantages of both systems. This has brought us one step closer to implementing a new, fast and reliable storage concept," Sextl says. The activities at the university were supported by the Fraunhofer Institute for Silicate Research in Würzburg, one of the leading battery research centres in Germany. Prof. Dr. Gerhard Sextl, Department for Chemical Technology of Material Synthesis, University of Würzburg, and Fraunhofer Institute for Silicate Research ISC, T +49 931 4100-100 To the homepage of the Fraunhofer Institute


News Article | January 18, 2016
Site: www.gwec.net

Offshore wind turbines with a total capacity of 2,282.4 megawatts went online in 2015. This demonstrates the capability of the German offshore wind industry and meets the expectations expressed at the beginning of 2015. This will however initially remain a unique record, as it is based on the catch-up effects of grid connection. The industry considers reliable, continuous expansion as a basis for more climate protection and value creation more important in the long term than any one-off records. To achieve such continuity it is necessary that the Renewable Energy Sources Act (EEG) 2016 and the Offshore Grid Development Plan (O-NEP) 2025 are properly coordinated. Berlin, 18 January 2016 – 546 offshore wind turbines, with a total capacity of 2,282.4 megawatts went on grid in Germany last year. This brings the total number of turbines connected to the grid by 31 December 2015 up to 792, with a combined capacity of 3,294.9 megawatts. A further 41 wind turbines with 246 megawatts of power were fully erected in the past year, but are not yet feeding in to the grid.122 foundations were build offshore in 2015, for wind turbines to be installed in 2016. These figures have been published by Deutsche WindGuard in its Status of Offshore Wind Energy Development in Germany, commissioned by the Working Group for Offshore Wind Energy (AGOW), the German Wind Energy Association (BWE), the German Offshore Wind Energy Foundation (SOW), VDMA Power Systems and the German Wind Energy Agency (WAB). According to the working group AG Energiebilanzen, offshore wind turbines produced over 8 terawatt hours of electricity in 2015. This is enough to cover the power consumption of over 2 million households or around 1.4 percent of the gross electricity generation in Germany. Continuous expansion: the basis for technological leadership and export The offshore wind industry considers the unusually high level of expansion over the past year to be an exceptional phenomenon. This is due to problems and delays with the completion of offshore grid connections since 2013 that could only be resolved last year. The industry forecasts additional capacity of around 700 megawatts in 2016. The foundations for a sustainable domestic market will be laid in the new Renewable Energy Sources Act (EEG) 2016. The unanimous opinion of the industry is that “The key points set by the German Ministry of Economics and Technology (BMWi) for the EEG 2016 establish an intermediate expansion target of 11,000 megawatts in 2025. This would mean an annual expansion of bare 700 megawatts, but it will take a continuous annual expansion volume of at least 900 megawatts from 2021 onwards to create a basis which would make it possible to reduce the cost of offshore wind energy, secure value creation and industrial production in Germany, and make a long term, effective contribution to security of supply”. Proper design of the tendering process and acceleration of grid expansion Crucial for the design of the future tendering system will be what the transition and start phases up to the mid 2020s look like, during which the tendering process will be introduced. They must be sensitively designed conform with industry needs in terms of volume, frequency and duration. It is also necessary to set a transitional period of at least four years and have more than one call for tenders during this period. Something that is also problematical when creating a tendering design for offshore wind energy is the threatened withdrawal of planning permission without adequate compensation. This would question the legal certainty for developed projects and severely limit planning security also for future investments. In order to avoid grave fluctuations in the expansion of offshore wind energy with stoppage phases and record years like 2015, the Offshore Grid Development Plan (O-NEP) 2025 must also take the offshore wind energy expansion into consideration sufficiently and in good time. The first draft by the transmission system operators for O-NEP 2025 must at least be adjusted to the key points of the EEG 2016, and should for grid capacity take into account the expansion targets, including adequate safety buffers. This is necessary in order to ensure the continuity of expansion. The offshore wind industry stands shoulder to shoulder with the onshore wind industry in rejecting the BMWi’s formula, whereby the expansion volume of onshore wind energy would be used as a volatile correction factor for the expansion of renewable energy. Onshore wind energy would be capped according to the formula, when other technologies, like offshore wind energy, meet their targets. The formula has strongly unsettled the renewables sector. “All technologies are dependent on long term planning and reliable targets”, emphasise the five industry associations. The results of the Paris climate conference (COP 21), which represent a logical extension of the climate protection agreements reached at the G20 meeting in Elmau, must be integrated into future national targets. The setting of the binding 2-degree target (and the ambitious possible reduction to only 1.5 degrees) requires further consistent and ambitious expansion of renewable energy in Germany. The offshore industry can make an important contribution here. The federal government could make this possible with the announced amendment of the EEG 2016. About the annual figures in “Status of Offshore Wind Energy Development in Germany” The Deutsche WindGuard analysis has collected data for the expansion of offshore wind energy separate from onshore wind energy since 2012. Their clients are VDMA Power Systems, the German Wind Energy Association (BWE), the German Offshore Wind Energy Foundation (SOW), the Wind Energy Agency (WAB), and the Working Group for Offshore Wind Energy (AGOW). The 2015 figures for onshore wind energy will be published on 27 January 2016. The Working Group for Offshore Wind Energy e.V. (AGOW) currently has 14 member enterprises involved in building and operating offshore wind farms. AGOW thus represents all the companies that build or operate wind farms in the German North and Baltic Seas, and those who have taken the relevant decisions. About Bundesverband Windenergie e.V. (BWE) As a member of the German Renewable Energy federation (BEE), the German Wind Energy Association (BWE), with over 20,000 members, represents the whole industry. Together, the suppliers and manufacturers anchored in the German engineering sector, project developers, specialist lawyers, the financial sector and enterprises from the logistics and construction, service/maintenance, and storage technology sectors, electricity traders, grid operators and utility companies ensure that the BWE is the first point of contact for government, business, science and media for all questions concerning wind energy. About Stiftung OFFSHORE-WINDENERGIE / German Offshore Wind Energy Foundation The non-profit German industry foundation for the use and research of offshore wind energy was founded in 2005 on the initiative of the industry and moderated by the German Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear safety (BMU). The foundation’s aim is to consolidate the role of offshore wind energy in Germany and Europe’s future energy mix, and to promote its expansion in the interests of environment and climate protection. About VDMA Power Systems VDMA Power Systems is an association belonging to the German Engineering Federation (VDMA e.V.). This association represents the interests of the manufacturers of wind turbines, hydro power plants, thermal turbines and power plants, and engine systems at home and abroad. For all of these, VDMA Power Systems serves as the information and communication platform for industry topics such as energy policy, legislation, market studies, trade fairs, standardisation, and press and PR work. About WAB e.V. WAB e.V. (Wind Energy Agency) is the leading wind energy enterprise network in the north-western region and nationwide contact for the offshore wind industry in Germany. The association’s membership includes over 350 businesses and institutes from all segments of the wind industry, maritime industry and research facilities. New builds in 2015 Offshore wind turbines with grid feed-in 2,282.4 MW (2014: 492.2 MW) 546 turbines


News Article | September 27, 2016
Site: www.greencarcongress.com

« Volkswagen Group & Audi accelerate fuel cell technology solutions program with Ballard | Main | New ICCT study identifies significant potential to reduce aviation fuel consumption by up to 40% by 2034 » Hydrogen-powered vehicles can now refill their tanks at the OMV service station in Metzingen. The opening of the new filling station continues the longstanding cooperation between the industry partners Daimler, Linde and OMV Deutschland as part of the Clean Energy Partnership (CEP), and marks another step towards a nationwide hydrogen infrastructure in Germany. The new hydrogen station is located at Auchtertstraße 19 in Metzingen. The official inauguration was attended by the representatives of the companies involved, as well as by Norbert Barthle, Parliamentary State Secretary at the Federal Ministry of Transport and Digital Infrastructure, and Ministerial Director Helmfried Meinel of the Baden-Württemberg Ministry for the Environment, Climate and Energy. Clean mobility, rapid refueling and long ranges are the advantages offered by fuel cell-based electric mobility. To help get the vehicles on the streets now, the Federal Ministry of Transport is sponsoring the establishment of 50 hydrogen filling stations across Germany with about 28 million euros. The Metzingen site is one of these stations, and will improve hydrogen supply in the Stuttgart metropolitan region. The focus of the infrastructure build-up is especially on the supply of metropolitan regions. The existing service stations already cover the Berlin, Hamburg, Rhine/Ruhr, Stuttgart and Munich metropolitan areas. The process of connecting them has already begun, and the network will be continuously expanded. Within the National Innovation Program for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology (NIP), Daimler and Linde are contributing with a total investment volume of around €20 million. The construction of the first public hydrogen filling station in Baden-Württemberg at Stuttgart airport in 2009 was also a cooperation between OMV, Daimler and Linde. The federal state now has eight such refueling sites. Daimler said that the technology of such locally emission-free fuel cell vehicles offers two major advantages compared to battery-powered vehicles: long ranges and short refueling times. The infrastructure build-up is timed to coincide with the planned market ramp-up of fuel cell vehicles from various manufacturers. The technology is an integral part of Daimler’s drive system strategy. Vehicles like the B-Class F-CELL and the Citaro FuelCELL-Hybrid urban bus have covered altogether more than twelve million kilometers to date. From 2017, a new generation of vehicles based on the Mercedes-Benz GLC will be launched: for the first time, a lithium-ion battery plug-in will be used in a fuel cell-powered electric vehicle as an additional source of energy. (Earlier post.)


News Article | December 7, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

In an effort to connect critical links between needs, opportunity and action, international organizations are coming together to identify opportunities to increase agricultural production while protecting natural resources with the launch of Solution Search. This global crowd-sourcing competition, launched today, is designed to spotlight the most promising approaches to conservation and development challenges. This year’s contest aims to focus on biodiversity-friendly resource solutions within the agricultural sector. Solution Search: Farming for Biodiversity, seeks entries that showcase innovative solutions in sustainable farming, while promoting behaviors that strengthen biodiversity across the agricultural sector. This theme is part of an overarching initiative of the Convention on Biological Diversity, and a focus of this year’s 13th annual Conference of Parties (COP) which aims to shine a spotlight on the critical need for cross-cutting conservation solutions across political, economic, and social spheres. "Solution Search is an online prize competition designed to crowdsource solutions to pressing conservation and human development challenges,” says Brett Jenks, President and CEO of Rare. “Practitioners are creating great solutions all over the world, but they rarely write them up or share them, so they almost never get replicated, much less scaled.” The contest will run in direct partnership with IFOAM-Organics International, with additional partners Convention on Biological Diversity Secretariat, Save the Children, Blue Solutions, the Global Island Partnership, and Panorama, joining from across the globe. “Organic farmers have been showing us for years that it is possible to nourish soils, grow nutritious food and safeguard biodiversity,” says André Leu, President of IFOAM Organics International. “This competition is a great opportunity for them and the entire organic movement to showcase tried and tested innovative solutions that can bring true sustainability to our food and farming systems.” This year’s Solution Search judging panel includes, Cristiana Paşca Palmer (Minister of Environment, Waters and Forests for Romania and incoming Executive Secretary of the Convention on Biological Dieversity), Danielle Nierenberg (Co-Founder and President of Food Tank), Dr. Naoko Ishii (CEO and Chairperson of Global Environmental Facility), and Ilona Porsché, (Head of Blue Solutions Initiative), who said of her involvement, "I am excited to participate in this year’s Solution Search contest, and offer our technical expertise in sourcing, documenting and sharing solutions." Additional judges include Per Olsson, (Theme leader, Stockholm Resilience Center), Juan Pablo Bonilla (Sector Manager, Climate Change and Sustainable Development, Inter-American Development Bank), Bonnie McClafferty (Director, Agriculture and Nutrition, GAIN) and Pedro Alvarez Icaza L., (General Coordinator for Biological Corridors and Resources, CONABIO - Mexico). Over the next nine months, the Solution Search partners will be soliciting entries, working with expert judges to narrow the field and asking the public to weigh in and vote as well.    The grand prize winner will receive $30,000, and there will be four category prizes of $15,000. There will be an early entrant prize of $5,000 to the best entry received by February 10, 2017. All prize money must be used to further the winner’s solution and organization’s goals. All finalists will win a trip to New York City to attend a capacity-building workshop and awards ceremony alongside some of the biggest names in conservation and development. This contest is part of a larger project run in joint partnership by Rare and IFOAM-Organics International, and is funded by the International Climate Initiative (IKI), a German initiative supported by The Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation, Building and Nuclear Safety (BMUB) on the basis of a decision adopted by the German Bundestag. Over three years, the partners will work together to identify these promising approaches and then host capacity-building workshops across the globe to spread these effective solutions. This workshop series – known as Campaigning for Conservation, will aim to further empower local practitioners to raise awareness of the value of biodiversity and to conduct social marketing campaigns promoting behavior change in support of the identified solutions. All entries to this contest will become part of a larger network of stakeholders engaged in supporting biodiversity-friendly agriculture. Visit solutionsearch.org to learn more, apply, or nominate a fellow organization with a chance to win a $1,000 nomination prize yourself. Ranked in the top 25 NGOs in the world by NGO ADVISORS, Rare is an innovative conservation organization that implements proven conservation solutions and trains local leaders in communities worldwide. Through its signature social marketing campaigns (called Pride campaigns), Rare inspires people to take pride in the species and habitats that make their community unique, while also introducing practical alternatives to environmentally destructive practices. Employees of local governments or non-profit organizations receive extensive training on fisheries management, campaign planning and social marketing to communities. They are equipped to deliver community-based solutions based on natural and social science, while leveraging policy and market forces to accelerate positive environmental change through programs in clean water, sustainable agriculture, and coastal fisheries. To learn more about Rare, please visit http://www.rare.org. For more information and downloadable imagery, please visit our electronic press kit at https://www.rare.org/en-press-kit. Since 1972, IFOAM - Organics International has occupied an unchallenged position as the only international umbrella organisation within the organic agriculture sector, uniting an enormous diversity of relevant stakeholders and key actors. IFOAM - Organics International implements the will of its broad-based constituency, close to 800 Affiliates in 125 countries, in a fair, inclusive and participatory manner. IFOAM’s vision is worldwide adoption of ecologically, socially and economically sound agriculture systems, which will support the projects overarching goal to mainstream biodiversity into the agricultural sector. Through their extensive experi-ence working with smallholders, family farms and cooperatives in the sector, and by building local capacity through their Leadership Courses, IFOAM has the right knowledge, expertise, institutional structure and products to support the project. Since 2008, the International Climate Initiative (IKI) of the Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation, Building and Nuclear Safety (BMUB) has been financing climate and biodiversity projects in developing and newly industrialising countries, as well as in countries in transition. Based on a decision taken by the German parliament (Bundestag), a sum of at least 120 million euros is available for use by the initiative annually. For the first few years the IKI was financed through the auctioning of emission allowances, but it is now funded from the budget of the BMUB. The IKI is a key element of Germany’s climate financing and the funding commitments in the framework of the Convention on Biological Diversity. The Initiative places clear emphasis on climate change mitigation, adaption to the impacts of climate change and the protection of biological diversity. These efforts provide various co-benefits, particularly the improvement of living conditions in partner countries. The IKI focuses on four areas: mitigating greenhouse gas emissions, adapting to the impacts of climate change, conserving natural carbon sinks with a focus on reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD+), as well as conserving biological diversity. New projects are primarily selected through a two-stage procedure that takes place once a year. Priority is given to activities that support creating an international climate protection architecture, to transparency, and to innovative and transferable solutions that have an impact beyond the individual project. The IKI cooperates closely with partner countries and supports consensus building for a comprehensive international climate agreement and the implementation of the Convention on Biological Diversity. Moreover, it is the goal of the IKI to create as many synergies as possible between climate protection and biodiversity conservation.


Beets P.N.,Scion Research | Brandon A.M.,Ministry for the Environment | Goulding C.J.,Scion Research | Kimberley M.O.,Scion Research | And 2 more authors.
Forest Ecology and Management | Year: 2011

The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) requires reporting net carbon stock changes and anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions, including those related to forests. This paper describes the design and implementation of a nation-wide forest inventory of New Zealand's planted post-1989 forests that arose from Land Use, Land-Use Change and Forestry activities (LULUCF) under Article 3.3 of the Kyoto Protocol. The majority of these forests are planted with Pinus radiata, with the remainder made up of other species exotic to New Zealand. At the start of the project there was no on-going national forest inventory that could be used as a basis for calculating carbon stocks and meet Good Practice Guidelines.A network of ground-based permanent sample plots was installed with airborne LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) for double sampling using regression estimators to predict carbon in each of the four carbon pools of above- and below-ground live biomass, dead wood and litter. Measurement, data acquisition and quality assurance/control protocols were developed specifically for the inventory, carried out in 2007 and 2008. Plots were located at the intersection of a forest with a 4. km square grid, coincident with an equivalent 8. km square grid established over the indigenous forest and " grassland with woody biomass" (Other Wooded Land). Planted tree carbon within a ground plot was calculated by an integrated system of growth, wood density and compartment allocation models utilising the data from measurements of trees and shrubs on the plots. This system, called the Forest Carbon Predictor, predicts past and future carbon in a stand and is conditioned so that the calculated basal area and mean top height equals that obtained by conventional mensuration methods at the time of the plot measurement. Mean per hectare carbon stocks were then multiplied by an estimate of the total area of post 1989 forests obtained from wall to wall mapping using a combination of satellite imagery and ortho-photography.The network of permanent samples plots and LiDAR double sampling methodology was designed to be simple and robust to change over time. In the future, using LiDAR should achieve sampling efficiencies over using ground plots alone and reduces any problems regarding restricted access on the ground. The network is to be remeasured at the end of commitment period 1, 2012, and the carbon stocks re-estimated in order to calculate change. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.


Dixon R.,Ministry for the Environment | McGregor A.,Victoria University of Wellington
Development and Change | Year: 2011

This article explores the tensions between aid funding and grassroots development goals in the context of post-disaster fisheries reconstruction in Aceh, Indonesia. We argue that both short- and long-term grassroots goals are distorted by upward accountability requirements which lead to unsatisfactory aid outcomes. Our analysis employs the concept of aid webs and draws on fifty-one formal interviews with stakeholders in Aceh in 2007/2008. The findings initially concentrate on the impacts of upward accountability on project cycles, with a particular focus on the problematic incorporation of private boat-building contractors and commercial values during the implementation phase. We then discuss the more subtle, long-term impacts of upward accountability on the professionalization of community institutions - in this case, the Panglima Laot Lhok. We conclude with a few observations about the hybrid institutions - combining elements of local and development cultures - that are produced within the current political economy of aid. © 2011 International Institute of Social Studies.


Kalabokas P.D.,Academy of Athens | Adamopoulos A.D.,Ministry for the Environment | Viras L.G.,Ministry for the Environment
Global Nest Journal | Year: 2010

The analysis of thePM10particle measurements at the two major urban areas of Greece, Athens and Thessaloniki, showed that the mean monthlyPM10concentrations at the central urban stations, are on the average about twice as high than the corresponding ones at the examined peripheral stations. The distribution of the dailyPM10values shows significant violations of the EU air quality standards, especially in the central urban stations. At the peripheral stations comparable distributions ofPM10concentration values are found. The highestPM 10hourly values are recorded at the central urban stations during the cold semester of the year and during the morning hours. The scatter-plot diagrams of the central urban dailyPM10mean values versus the peripheral stations show important influence of the regional aerosol episodes on the measuredPM10concentrations in the urban areas of Athens and Thessaloniki, which is stronger in Athens and during the warm semester of the year. The PM10 diurnal variation pattern are quite similar with the corresponding variations observed for primary urban pollutants, like the morning and the evening peaks, but also at the peripheral stations exhibit a broad mid-day peak indicating elevated rural backgroundPM10levels. Additional daily measurements at the rural station of Aliartos in Central Greece give PM10 average values around 30 μg m-3, comparable to the corresponding averagePM10values of the peripheral stations in Athens and Thessaloniki. Such high rural backgroundPM10daily mean values could lead to average annual values higher than the corresponding EU PM10 standard (40 μg m-3) and should be taken into account in the formulation of the local pollution abatement strategies as they represent about the half of the averagePM10levels measured at the central urban stations of both examined urban areas. Copyright © 2010 Global NEST.


Ruckstuhl K.,University of Otago | Thompson-Fawcett M.,University of Otago | Rae H.,Ministry for the Environment
Impact Assessment and Project Appraisal | Year: 2014

The term 'social licence to operate' (SLO) is relatively new to public discourse in Aotearoa New Zealand. It is increasingly being used in the aquaculture, dairy and mining industries due to their rapid intensification and consequent impact on natural resources. For Indigenous New Zealanders, Māori, there has been contestation about land and water usage since the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840. Māori have struggled to have their voices recognised. However, since 1975, the country has been developing a process that recognises Māori rights. For Māori, the Treaty of Waitangi is the prime 'social licence'. In this paper, we contextualise the notion of SLO in light of the Treaty of Waitangi, specifically in the case of mineral extraction. We examine the extent to which Māori values, as expressed through Māori resource management plans, cultural impact assessments and submissions on legislation, articulate the Māori SLO and what, in turn, this offers the wider field of impact assessment. © 2014 © 2014 IAIA.

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