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Di Paola-Naranjo R.D.,National University of Cordoba | Baroni M.V.,National University of Cordoba | Podio N.S.,National University of Cordoba | Rubinstein H.R.,National University of Cordoba | And 10 more authors.
Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry | Year: 2011

Our main goal was to investigate if robust chemical fingerprints could be developed for three Argentinean red wines based on organic, inorganic, and isotopic patterns, in relation to the regional soil composition. Soils and wines from three regions (Mendoza, San Juan, and Córdoba) and three varieties (Cabernet Sauvignon, Malbec, and Syrah) were collected. The phenolic profile was determined by HPLC-MS/MS and multielemental composition by ICP-MS; 87Sr/ 86Sr and δ 13C were determined by TIMS and IRMS, respectively. Chemometrics allowed robust differentiation between regions, wine varieties, and the same variety from different regions. Among phenolic compounds, resveratrol concentration was the most useful marker for wine differentiation, whereas Mg, K/Rb, Ca/Sr, and 87Sr/ 86Sr were the main inorganic and isotopic parameters selected. Generalized Procrustes analysis (GPA) using two studied matrices (wine and soil) shows consensus between them and clear differences between studied areas. Finally, we applied a canonical correlation analysis, demonstrating significant correlation (r = 0.99; p < 0.001) between soil and wine composition. To our knowledge this is the first report combining independent variables, constructing a fingerprint including elemental composition, isotopic, and polyphenol patterns to differentiate wines, matching part of this fingerprint with the soil provenance. © 2011 American Chemical Society.


Podio N.S.,National University of Cordoba | Baroni M.V.,National University of Cordoba | Badini R.G.,Ministerio de Ciencia y Tecnologia Provincia de Cordoba CEPROCOR | Inga M.,Ministerio de Ciencia y Tecnologia Provincia de Cordoba CEPROCOR | And 6 more authors.
Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry | Year: 2013

The aim of this study was to investigate if elemental and isotopic signatures of Argentinean wheat can be used to develop a reliable fingerprint to assess its geographical provenance. For this pilot study we used wheat cultivated at three different regions (Buenos Aires, Córdoba, and Entre Ríos), together with matching soil and water. Elemental composition was determined by ICP-MS. δ13C and δ15N were measured by isotopic ratio mass spectrometry, while 87Sr/ 86Sr ratio was determined using thermal ionization mass spectrometry. Wheat samples from three sampling sites were differentiated by the combination of 11 key variables (K/Rb, Ca/Sr, Ba, 87Sr/86Sr, Co, Mo, Zn, Mn, Eu, δ13C, and Na), demonstrating differences among the three studied regions. The application of generalized Procrustes analysis showed 99.2% consensus between cultivation soil, irrigation water, and wheat samples, in addition to clear differences between studied areas. Furthermore, canonical correlation analysis showed significant correlation between the elemental and isotopic profiles of wheat and those corresponding to both soil and water (r2 = 0.97, p < 0.001 and r2 = 0.96, p < 0.001, respectively). To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating the correspondence between soil, water, and wheat samples using different statistical methods, showing that wheat elemental and isotopic compositions are mainly related to soil and irrigation water characteristics of the site of growth. © 2013 American Chemical Society.


Baroni M.V.,National University of Cordoba | Podio N.S.,National University of Cordoba | Badini R.G.,Ministerio de Ciencia y Tecnologia Provincia de Cordoba CEPROCOR | Inga M.,Ministerio de Ciencia y Tecnologia Provincia de Cordoba CEPROCOR | And 7 more authors.
Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry | Year: 2011

The main goal of this study was to propose a reliable method to verify the geographical origin of meat, establishing the influence of soil and water on its isotopic and elemental composition. Thus, beef meat, soil, and water samples were collected from three major cattle-producing regions of Argentina (Buenos Aires, Córdoba, and Entre Ríos). Multielemental composition was determined on these three matrices by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), δ 13C and δ 15N by isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS), and the 87Sr/ 86Sr ratio by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). Soil and drinking water samples could be characterized and clearly differentiated by combining the isotopic ratios and elements, demonstrating differences in geology and climatic conditions of three regions. Similarly, meat originating at each sampling area was characterized and differentiated using only five key variables (Rb, Ca/Sr, δ 13C, δ 15N, and 87Sr/ 86Sr). Generalized procrustes analysis (GPA), using the three studied matrices (soil, water, and meat) shows consensus between them and clear differences between studied areas. Furthermore, canonical correlation analysis (CCA) demonstrates significant correlation between the chemical-isotopic profile of meat with those corresponding to both soil and water (r 2 = 0.93, p < 0.001; and r 2 = 0.83, p < 0.001, respectively). So far, there are clear coincidences between the meat fingerprint and those from soil/water where cattle grew, presenting a good method to establish beef provenance. To the authors' knowledge this is the first report linking the influence of soil and water all together on the composition of beef, presenting the basis for the authentication of Argentinean beef, which could be extended to meat from different provenances. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

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