Milsoft Utility Solutions Inc.

Buffalo, TX, United States

Milsoft Utility Solutions Inc.

Buffalo, TX, United States
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Kersting W.H.,Milsoft Utility Solutions Inc.
IEEE Transactions on Industry Applications | Year: 2016

A common load on a distribution feeder consists of a combination single-phase lighting load and a three-phase load such as an induction motor. This combination load can be served by a wye-delta transformer bank. The question is whether the wye connection should be directly connected to ground, connected to ground through a grounding resistor or left ungrounded. During normal loading conditions each connection has advantages and disadvantages. However, during a short circuit condition a grounded wye-delta bank will provide a 'backfeed' short circuit current for an upstream ground fault. This paper will develop methods for the analysis of the backfeed currents for an upstream line-toground fault. © 1972-2012 IEEE.


Kersting W.H.,Milsoft Utility Solutions Inc.
IEEE Transactions on Industry Applications | Year: 2015

Distribution systems are typically composed of radial feeders. Radial means that there is only one path of current flow to each of the loads on the feeder. There are times when it becomes necessary to form a loop in a feeder by closing switches. This may be because of an outage or a new load that will cause the radial current to exceed the conductor current rating or violate the American National Standards Institute voltage requirement. This paper will present a method for simulating the loop flow using an injection current technique. A simple single-phase circuit is used to demonstrate the steps in the simulation. Following that, the IEEE 13 bus test feeder will be studied as it is right now, followed by the addition of a new three-phase load at one bus and a new single-phase load added at another bus. Both of these loads are going to require the addition of new lines and the capability of operating the feeder with one or two closed loops. The process for simulating the closed loops will be presented. © 1972-2012 IEEE.


Kersting W.H.,Milsoft Utility Solutions Inc.
Papers Presented at the Annual Conference - Rural Electric Power Conference | Year: 2011

The IEEE Comprehensive Test Feeder was presented at the 2010 IEEE Transmission and Distribution Conference. [1] The purpose of this test feeder was to present the data for a radial distribution feeder that will require the modeling of all possible overhead and underground lines, voltage regulator connections and transformer connections. The data for the feeder can be found at the IEEE PES website. [2] This paper will demonstrate how the test feeder can be used to assist the distribution engineer in making decisions regarding the design of new or the upgrading of existing feeders. Particular attention will be paid to the many possible choices of three-phase transformer banks. © 2011 IEEE.


Kersting W.H.,Milsoft Utility Solutions Inc. | Carr W.,Milsoft Utility Solutions Inc.
Papers Presented at the Annual Conference - Rural Electric Power Conference | Year: 2016

A common load on a distribution feeder consists of a combination single-phase lighting load and a three-phase load such as an induction motor. This combination load can be served by a wye-delta transformer bank. The question is whether the wye connection should be directly connected to ground, connected to ground through a grounding resistor or left ungrounded. During normal loading conditions each connection has advantages and disadvantages. However, during a short circuit condition a grounded wye-delta bank will provide a "backfeed" short circuit current for an upstream ground fault. This paper will develop methods for the analysis of the backfeed currents for an upstream line-to ground fault. © 2016 IEEE.


Collier S.,Milsoft Utility Solutions Inc.
IEEE Industry Applications Magazine | Year: 2010

The U.S. electric grid is not smart. It was not planned and constructed to be able to meet the new constraints, variables and uncertainties that the future holds. The central system architecture and operating schemes havent really changed in a century. Long term construction and operations plans were founded upon the availability of extra capacity and redundancy to passively withstand short-term variation of demand, longer term growth and outages of lines and equipment. The traditional tools to achieve adequacy and reliability, additions to conventional generation, transmission and distribution assets, arenet as viable now. Already, electric utility performance indicators eroding: economy, reliability, security, asset value, profitability, sustainability, and service quality. © 2006 IEEE.


Collier S.E.,Milsoft Utility Solutions Inc.
Papers Presented at the Annual Conference - Rural Electric Power Conference | Year: 2015

Bob Metcalfe, inventor of the ethernet and wellknown technology visionary, once said, 'Over the past 63 years, we met world needs for cheap and clean information by building the Internet. Over the next 63 years, we will meet world needs for cheap and clean energy by building the Enernet.' The Internet has resulted from revolutionary advances in electronics, telecommunications and information technologies, devices and applications. While it began as an Internet connecting people, by 2008 it connected more things than people. Its exponential growth has been primarily as an Internet of Things. Cisco has predicted that 50 billion new connections will be made in this Internet of Things (IoT) by 2020. The U.S. electric utility grid has until now been a patchwork of monolithic, weakly interconnected, synchronous AC grids powered by a few thousand or so very large power plants that are centrally monitored and controlled. For a variety of reasons this legacy grid approach is proving to be non-viable for the present and the future. It is being supplemented and may ultimately be supplanted by many, smaller networks with literally millions of distributed generation, storage, and energy management nodes. The grid is literally exploding into a network of things. Many consider it to be the largest example of an Internet of Things. The Enernet will be the inevitable convergence of the smart grid with the Internet of Things. Utilities, their customers and non-utility will find it necessary to plan, engineer and operate in the presence of orders of magnitude more devices and systems (e.g., smart nodes on the utility systems and, for consumers, smart thermostats, appliances, PHEVs/EVs, distributed generation / storage, premises monitoring, automation, and EMS, even transactive energy markets)fiultimately leading to billions of new points that require monitoring, analysis and management. Meanwhile, the Internet of Things steadily grows more ubiquitous, powerful, economical and secure. It is an obviously attractive platform for the smart grid or, as Metcalfe has said, the control plane for the smart grid. The purpose of this paper is to discuss why and how the production and utilization of electric energy will become inseparable, even indistinguishable from the Internet of Things. © 2015 IEEE.


Kersting W.H.,Milsoft Utility Solutions Inc.
IEEE Transactions on Industry Applications | Year: 2010

Step voltage regulators are the workhorse of distribution feeders for maintaining the voltage at every customer's meter to be within the ANSI standards. A step voltage regulator can be viewed as a tap-changing autotransformer. This paper will apply a model of the step voltage regulator. The IEEE 13 Node Test Feeders will be used to demonstrate how the regulator is controlled in order to maintain the desired voltage for full-, light-, and future-load conditions. The coordination of step voltage regulators with shunt capacitors will be included. © 2010 IEEE.


Shirek G.J.,Milsoft Utility Solutions Inc. | Lassiter B.A.,Milsoft Utility Solutions Inc.
IEEE Industry Applications Magazine | Year: 2013

Both the renewable portfolio standard requirements and the potential to delay distribution upgrade expenditures has resulted in a vast increase of distributed energy resources (DERs) on utility systems. As a result, distribution engineers are confronted with the very challenging task of fulfilling the scope of a system impact study to determine whether there exists the potential for the DER to create any adverse operational or voltage issues, now or in the future, as system changes occur. Fortunately, there are industry standards and guides that describe how to fulfill the technical study requirements with some step-by-step guidance. The complexity of the system impact study also depends heavily upon the type and size of the DER and its operating modes. An all-encompassing study might cover a vast number of areas with just a few of these being voltage and stability analysis, harmonics, transients, distribution system protection, and DER relaying requirements. Predicting photovoltaic (PV) generation profiles for different seasons and hours of the day rests heavily on the plant design and layout. © 1975-2012 IEEE.


Kersting W.H.,Milsoft Utility Solutions Inc.
IEEE Industry Applications Magazine | Year: 2011

New engineers entering the electric utility industry should know the answers to the following questions. Why do electrical engineers perform distribution system planning studies? Why are unbalanced studies needed? Why should distribution lines be modeled as nontransposed? Why is the phasing of distribution lines and loads important? Why are power losses important, and how are they computed? Why is the power factor measured at the substation important? Why is the power factor of the loads important? Why is it necessary to know the exact connection of three-phase transformer banks? Why are the symmetrical components not used in distribution system analysis? Why should not an induction motor be modeled as a constant PQ load? Why are R and X settings used on tap-changing voltage regulators? This article will present the answers for the above questions. © 2011 IEEE.


Trademark
Milsoft Utility Solutions Inc. | Date: 2012-11-20

computer software program for electricity transmission and distribution modeling and analysis, outage management, communications, geospatial information management, field engineering, and operations and engineering for electrical utilities.

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