Decatur, IL, United States

Millikin University

www.millikin.edu
Decatur, IL, United States

Millikin University is an American co-educational, comprehensive, private, four-year university with traditional undergraduate programs in arts and science, business, fine arts, and professional studies, as well as non-traditional, adult degree-completion programs and graduate programs in business administration and nursing. Millikin's campus is in Decatur, Illinois and serves approximately 2,400 students with a student/faculty ratio of 12 to 1 and an average class size of 23 students. The school was founded in 1901 by prominent Decatur businessman James Millikin. Wikipedia.

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News Article | May 5, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

LearnHowToBecome.org, a leading resource provider for higher education and career information, has released its list of the Best Colleges in Illinois for 2017. 50 four-year colleges were ranked, with Northwestern University, University of Chicago, Bradley University, Illinois Institute of Technology and Augustana College taking the top five spots on the list. 49 two-year schools were also selected; Carl Sandburg College, Illinois Central College, Richland Community College, Rend Lake College and Lincoln Land Community College were the top five. A complete list of schools is included below. “The schools on our list have shown that they offer outstanding educational programs that set students up for post-college success,” said Wes Ricketts, senior vice president of LearnHowToBecome.org. “Students exploring higher education options in Illinois can also look to these schools to provide top-quality resources that help maximize the overall educational experience.” To be included on the “Best Colleges in Illinois” list, all schools must be not-for-profit and regionally accredited. Each college is also evaluated metrics including annual alumni earnings, the opportunity for employment services and academic counseling, the selection of degree programs offered, financial aid availability and graduation rates. Complete details on each college, their individual scores and the data and methodology used to determine the LearnHowToBecome.org “Best Colleges in Illinois” list, visit: The Best Four-Year Colleges in Illinois for 2017 include: Augustana College Aurora University Benedictine University Blackburn College Bradley University Chicago State University Concordia University-Chicago DePaul University Dominican University Eastern Illinois University Elmhurst College Eureka College Governors State University Greenville College Illinois College Illinois Institute of Technology Illinois State University Illinois Wesleyan University Judson University Knox College Lake Forest College Lewis University Loyola University Chicago MacMurray College McKendree University Millikin University Monmouth College National Louis University North Central College North Park University Northern Illinois University Northwestern University Olivet Nazarene University Principia College Quincy University Rockford University Roosevelt University Rush University Saint Xavier University Southern Illinois University-Carbondale Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville Trinity Christian College Trinity International University-Illinois University of Chicago University of Illinois at Chicago University of Illinois at Springfield University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign University of St Francis Western Illinois University Wheaton College The Best Two-Year Colleges in Illinois for 2017 include: Black Hawk College Carl Sandburg College City Colleges of Chicago - Harry S Truman College City Colleges of Chicago - Malcolm X College City Colleges of Chicago - Wilbur Wright College City Colleges of Chicago-Harold Washington College City Colleges of Chicago-Kennedy-King College City Colleges of Chicago-Olive-Harvey College City Colleges of Chicago-Richard J Daley College College of DuPage College of Lake County Danville Area Community College Elgin Community College Frontier Community College Harper College Heartland Community College Highland Community College Illinois Central College Illinois Valley Community College John A Logan College John Wood Community College Joliet Junior College Kankakee Community College Kaskaskia College Kishwaukee College Lake Land College Lewis and Clark Community College Lincoln Land Community College Lincoln Trail College MacCormac College McHenry County College Moraine Valley Community College Morton College Oakton Community College Olney Central College Parkland College Prairie State College Rend Lake College Richland Community College Rock Valley College Sauk Valley Community College Shawnee Community College South Suburban College Southeastern Illinois College Southwestern Illinois College Spoon River College Triton College Wabash Valley College Waubonsee Community College ### About Us: LearnHowtoBecome.org was founded in 2013 to provide data and expert driven information about employment opportunities and the education needed to land the perfect career. Our materials cover a wide range of professions, industries and degree programs, and are designed for people who want to choose, change or advance their careers. We also provide helpful resources and guides that address social issues, financial aid and other special interest in higher education. Information from LearnHowtoBecome.org has proudly been featured by more than 700 educational institutions.


Cook M.P.,Auburn University | Gremo M.,Millikin University | Morgan R.,Millikin University
Simulation and Gaming | Year: 2017

Purpose. The purpose of this study was to explored the use of a tabletop role-playing game in middle school ELA classrooms to examine students’ (n=36) abilities to interact with and make meaning from a traditional classroom text (Richard Connell’s “The Most Dangerous Game”). Background. Gaming continues to soar in popularity, both inside and outside of schools. As such, it is important to continue looking for pedagogically beneficial ways to incorporate gaming into classroom spaces, specifically English Language Arts and Literacy classrooms. Aim. In this article, we describe the game used for this study was modified from the Pathfinder system and designed to pair with Connell’s short story. We also discuss our qualitative approach to data analysis, and the three themes that emerged. First, students made gaming decisions based on their knowledge of the story. Second, students experienced the narrative through the lens of their characters. And third, students engaged in meaningful collaboration throughout gameplay. Conclusion. The findings support ongoing calls to look for pedagogically beneficial ways to incorporate gaming into ELA and Literacy classroom spaces. © 2016, © The Author(s) 2016.


News Article | December 7, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Many bird lovers put out feeders full of seed for their feathered friends--but those feeders may also attract predators that eat eggs and nestlings. The researchers behind a new study in The Condor: Ornithological Applications tried to untangle these relationships through a four-year study of songbird nests, bird feeders, and predators in urban Central Ohio. Feeders may attract more predators to an area, but the food can also satiate predators so that they're less likely to target nests. To learn more, Jennifer Malpass of The Ohio State University and her colleagues tracked the relationships between the success of American Robin and Northern Cardinal nests, the presence of potential nest predators like squirrels, domestic cats, and other birds, and the presence of bird feeders in the area. Relationships among feeders, predators and nest survival were complex --areas with lots of feeders had more cowbirds and crows, birds that are known to prey on songbird nests, but that didn't generally affect the success of the nests the researchers monitored. "One key message of our work is that there may be species-specific responses to anthropogenic foods," says Malpass. Robins did experience increased nest predation in one specific set of circumstances, when neighborhoods contained both high numbers of bird feeders and large concentrations of crows. Human-dominated environments, it turns out, are complicated and variable, not lending themselves to simple generalizations. To collect their data, Malpass and her colleagues spent four years monitoring songbird nests and conducting surveys for potential nest predators in seven residential neighborhoods in Columbus, Ohio. "One of the challenges of conducting research in the suburban matrix is gaining access to private property," says Malpass. "In our experience, most of the residents in our focal neighborhoods were willing to allow access to their yards and had a positive experience being part of the project." "Even with over 50 million Americans feeding wild birds and other wildlife around their homes, our scientific understanding of the practice continues to lag," according to Millikin University's David Horn, an expert on wild bird feeding who was not involved with the study. "The study by Malpass, Rodewald, and Matthews increases our understanding of how the provision of supplemental food may influence predator abundance and nest survival of two common songbird species." "Species-dependent effects of bird feeders on nest predators and nest survival of urban American Robins and Northern Cardinals" will be available December 7, 2016, at http://americanornithologypubs. (issue URL http://americanornithologypubs. ). About the journal: The Condor: Ornithological Applications is a peer-reviewed, international journal of ornithology. It began in 1899 as the journal of the Cooper Ornithological Club, a group of ornithologists in California that became the Cooper Ornithological Society, which merged with the American Ornithologists' Union in 2016 to become the American Ornithological Society.


News Article | December 7, 2016
Site: phys.org

In neighborhoods with large concentrations of bird feeders and crows, American robin nests are less successful. Credit: J. Malpass Many bird lovers put out feeders full of seed for their feathered friends—but those feeders may also attract predators that eat eggs and nestlings. The researchers behind a new study in The Condor: Ornithological Applications tried to untangle these relationships through a four-year study of songbird nests, bird feeders, and predators in urban Central Ohio. Feeders may attract more predators to an area, but the food can also satiate predators so that they're less likely to target nests. To learn more, Jennifer Malpass of The Ohio State University and her colleagues tracked the relationships between the success of American Robin and Northern Cardinal nests, the presence of potential nest predators like squirrels, domestic cats, and other birds, and the presence of bird feeders in the area. Relationships among feeders, predators and nest survival were complex —areas with lots of feeders had more cowbirds and crows, birds that are known to prey on songbird nests, but that didn't generally affect the success of the nests the researchers monitored. "One key message of our work is that there may be species-specific responses to anthropogenic foods," says Malpass. Robins did experience increased nest predation in one specific set of circumstances, when neighborhoods contained both high numbers of bird feeders and large concentrations of crows. Human-dominated environments, it turns out, are complicated and variable, not lending themselves to simple generalizations. To collect their data, Malpass and her colleagues spent four years monitoring songbird nests and conducting surveys for potential nest predators in seven residential neighborhoods in Columbus, Ohio. "One of the challenges of conducting research in the suburban matrix is gaining access to private property," says Malpass. "In our experience, most of the residents in our focal neighborhoods were willing to allow access to their yards and had a positive experience being part of the project." "Even with over 50 million Americans feeding wild birds and other wildlife around their homes, our scientific understanding of the practice continues to lag," according to Millikin University's David Horn, an expert on wild bird feeding who was not involved with the study. "The study by Malpass, Rodewald, and Matthews increases our understanding of how the provision of supplemental food may influence predator abundance and nest survival of two common songbird species." Explore further: Electronic tracking of song birds shows roads and urban features influence their choice of gardens More information: "Species-dependent effects of bird feeders on nest predators and nest survival of urban American Robins and Northern Cardinals" December 7, 2016, americanornithologypubs.org/doi/full/10.1650/CONDOR-16-72.1


News Article | December 7, 2016
Site: www.chromatographytechniques.com

Many bird lovers put out feeders full of seed for their feathered friends--but those feeders may also attract predators that eat eggs and nestlings. The researchers behind a new study in The Condor: Ornithological Applications tried to untangle these relationships through a four-year study of songbird nests, bird feeders, and predators in urban Central Ohio. Feeders may attract more predators to an area, but the food can also satiate predators so that they're less likely to target nests. To learn more, Jennifer Malpass of The Ohio State University and her colleagues tracked the relationships between the success of American Robin and Northern Cardinal nests, the presence of potential nest predators like squirrels, domestic cats, and other birds, and the presence of bird feeders in the area. Relationships among feeders, predators and nest survival were complex --areas with lots of feeders had more cowbirds and crows, birds that are known to prey on songbird nests, but that didn't generally affect the success of the nests the researchers monitored. "One key message of our work is that there may be species-specific responses to anthropogenic foods," says Malpass. Robins did experience increased nest predation in one specific set of circumstances, when neighborhoods contained both high numbers of bird feeders and large concentrations of crows. Human-dominated environments, it turns out, are complicated and variable, not lending themselves to simple generalizations. To collect their data, Malpass and her colleagues spent four years monitoring songbird nests and conducting surveys for potential nest predators in seven residential neighborhoods in Columbus, Ohio. "One of the challenges of conducting research in the suburban matrix is gaining access to private property," says Malpass. "In our experience, most of the residents in our focal neighborhoods were willing to allow access to their yards and had a positive experience being part of the project." "Even with over 50 million Americans feeding wild birds and other wildlife around their homes, our scientific understanding of the practice continues to lag," according to Millikin University's David Horn, an expert on wild bird feeding who was not involved with the study. "The study by Malpass, Rodewald, and Matthews increases our understanding of how the provision of supplemental food may influence predator abundance and nest survival of two common songbird species."


Dasgupta N.,University of Massachusetts Amherst | Scircle M.M.,Millikin University | Hunsinger M.,Pacific University in Oregon
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America | Year: 2015

For years, public discourse in science education, technology, and policy-making has focused on the "leaky pipeline" problem: the observation that fewer women than men enter science, technology, engineering, and mathematics fields and more women than men leave. Less attention has focused on experimentally testing solutions to this problem. We report an experiment investigating one solution: we created "microenvironments" (small groups) in engineering with varying proportions of women to identify which environment increases motivation and participation, and whether outcomes depend on students' academic stage. Female engineering students were randomly assigned to one of three engineering groups of varying sex composition: 75% women, 50% women, or 25% women. For first-years, group composition had a large effect: women in female-majority and sex-parity groups felt less anxious than women in female-minority groups. However, among advanced students, sex composition had no effect on anxiety. Importantly, group composition significantly affected verbal participation, regardless of women's academic seniority: women participated more in female-majority groups than sex-parity or female-minority groups. Additionally, when assigned to female-minority groups,women who harbored implicit masculine stereotypes about engineering reported less confidence and engineering career aspirations. However, in sexparity and female-majority groups, confidence and career aspirations remained high regardless of implicit stereotypes. These data suggest that creating small groups with high proportions of women in otherwise male-dominated fields is one way to keep women engaged and aspiring toward engineering careers. Although sex parity works sometimes, it is insufficient to boost women's verbal participation in group work, which often affects learning and mastery. © 2015, National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.


Bhattacharyya S.,University of Illinois at Chicago | Jha S.,University of New Hampshire | Tharakunnel K.,Millikin University | Westland J.C.,University of Illinois at Chicago
Decision Support Systems | Year: 2011

Credit card fraud is a serious and growing problem. While predictive models for credit card fraud detection are in active use in practice, reported studies on the use of data mining approaches for credit card fraud detection are relatively few, possibly due to the lack of available data for research. This paper evaluates two advanced data mining approaches, support vector machines and random forests, together with the well-known logistic regression, as part of an attempt to better detect (and thus control and prosecute) credit card fraud. The study is based on real-life data of transactions from an international credit card operation. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Olson-Sitki K.,Memorial Medical Center | Wendler M.C.,Memorial Medical Center | Forbes G.,Millikin University
Journal for Nurses in Staff Development | Year: 2012

Nurse residency programs are designed to support graduate nurses as they assume the professional role. Evaluation of these programs has been inconsistent. The purpose of this descriptive research study was to evaluate a year-long nurse residency program using a nonexperimental, repeated measures design with qualitative questions. Results showed statistically significant differences in new nurse confidence, skills, and abilities at 12 months. Nursing turnover was one third of the national average. The metatheme that emerged from the data was "I see that I am not the only one.". Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.


Watson C.R.,Millikin University | Li Z.,Harvard - Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics | Polley N.K.,Millikin University
Journal of Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics | Year: 2012

We use the Chandra unresolved X-ray emission spectrum from a 12′-28′ (2.8-6.4 kpc) annular region of the Andromeda galaxy to constrain the radiative decay of sterile neutrino warm dark matter. By excising the most baryon-dominated, central 2.8 kpc of the galaxy, we reduce the uncertainties in our estimate of the dark matter mass within the field of view and improve the signal-to-noise ratio of prospective sterile neutrino decay signatures relative to hot gas and unresolved stellar emission. Our findings impose the most stringent limit on the sterile neutrino mass to date in the context of the Dodelson-Widrow model, m s < 2.2 keV (95% C.L.). Our results also constrain alternative sterile neutrino production scenarios at very small active-sterile neutrino mixing angles. © 2012 IOP Publishing Ltd and Sissa Medialab srl.

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