Appleton, WI, United States
Appleton, WI, United States

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D'Arcy A.,Miller Electrical Manufacturing Co.
Welding Journal | Year: 2014

Metal-cored welding wire formulated for galvanized steel is capable of providing faster travel speeds, which lowers the heat input. Combined with a pulsed gas metal arc welding (GMAW-P) process, it can help improve productivity and efficiency on this material while also producing high weld quality. It is a type of tubular wire consisting of a metal sheath filled with metallic powders, alloys, and arc stabilizers. Galvanized steel has a protective layer of zinc on its surface, so the material offers excellent corrosion resistance even at thinner gauges. The thinness and zinc coating of galvanized steel are characteristics that provide many benefits, but they can also be source of porosity and melt-through. The new metal cored welding wire is designed to weld at 40 inches/min in robotic applications. The faster travel speed and lower defect rates can help automotive manufacturers increase throughput, reduce expenditures related to work and save time and money.


Ryan J.,Miller Electrical Manufacturing Co.
Welding Journal | Year: 2014

Two common practices in pipe fabrication that offer many benefits for productivity, quality, and operator comfort are preheating and rolling the pipe while welding. Preheating pipe helps reduce the potential for a failed weld, and it is necessary for meeting code or quality requirements when the pipe is chromemoly, more than 1 inch thick, or stored in cold environments. Induction heating of pipe has been around for decades, but it was not well suited for roll-welded applications due to the heating cables that had to be wrapped around the pipe. Rolling induction technology is designed for easy and quick setup and repositioning. The hinged arm and rolling inductor mount on a standard pipe stand, so the welding operator can align the induction head on the pipe.


Poirier D.,Miller Electrical Manufacturing Co.
Manufacturing Engineering | Year: 2014

Pairing galvanized steel with metal-cored wire offers speed and performance benefits in automotive welding applications. Because galvanized steel offers thinner gages while still providing high strength and corrosion resistance, the material can help automotive manufacturers reduce total weight by hundreds of pounds in some cases, to help meet the increasingly strict fuel economy requirements. Surface porosity on galvanized steel is a common issue that is regulated by American Welding Society (AWS) standards, the travel speed used during the welding process directly impacts the presence of porosity. In addition to porosity, other potential challenges when welding galvanized steel include risk of burn through due to the heat input, and the presence of silica islands in the weld, especially those that may break free after the e-coat or paint process or those that adhere to the toes of the weld, which can be a potential source of rust later on in a the life of the part. Another issue for manufacturers to consider when converting to galvanized steel is the weld fume created during the process. Metal cored wire carries higher current densities making it possible to put more weld metal in a joint in less time during the welding process.


Ryan J.,Miller Electrical Manufacturing Co.
Welding Journal | Year: 2013

Remote control welding technologies offer innovative ways to improve job site safety. Remote control welding technologies offer welding operators the ability to make critical process changes and parameter adjustments at the weld joint versus at the power source, thereby eliminating the need to navigate cluttered job sites and risk potential injury. Locating the welding controls next to the work site offers the additional benefit of encouraging proper machine settings to improve quality, and provides for more arc-on time, which leads to a larger number of completed welds and greater overall productivity. Welding equipment manufacturers in today's marketplace offer various remote technologies for the shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) processes, both of which are common in field applications.


Ryan J.,Miller Electrical Manufacturing Co.
Welding Journal | Year: 2013

Pride of the Hills was introduced to induction heating with Miller ProHeatâ„¢ while welding a pressure vessel, a process that generates heat electromagnetically in the part. With an induction heating system, heat is created electromagnetically in the part by placing it in an alternating magnetic field created by liquid-cooled induction heating cables. The induction cables are wrapped around the part, or on the part, and do not heat up themselves, but create eddy currents inside the part that generate heat. Induction heating gives Pride of the Hills control to ramp up the temperature as fast or as slow as dictated by the code. Similarly, after spending the prescribed amount of time at its soak temperature, the system can ramp down the temperature to code requirements. This overall process can last 5 to 12 h, depending on the thickness of the vessel. Pride of the Hills was able to take numerous days out of total product development, while taking up a relatively small footprint in its manufacturing facility, by using induction heating.


Cuhel J.,Miller Electrical Manufacturing Co. | Benson D.,Hobart Brothers Co.
Welding Journal | Year: 2012

The basics of welding stainless steel tube and pipe for applications ranging from high-purity food and beverage, pharmaceuticals, and petrochemicals, are discussed. When prepping stainless steel, dedicated brushes, files, and grinders should be used that never touch carbon steel or aluminum. Filler metals with an 'L' designation, such as ER3O8L, provide a lower maximum carbon content, which can help retain corrosion resistance in low-carbon stainless alloys. Straight argon is recommended for gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) of stainless steel tube and pipe. Precisely controlled metal transfer with modified short-circuit GMAW provides uniform droplet deposition and makes it easier for the welder to control the weld pool and, thus, heat input and welding speeds. A modified short circuit GMAW process presents an improvement over traditional short-circuit GMAW in that the welding system anticipates and controls the short circuit, then reduces the welding current to create a consistent metal transfer.


McEllis T.,Miller Electrical Manufacturing Co.
Welding Journal | Year: 2012

Accurate real-time and historical weld process information provides data to help companies improve productivity, ensure quality, and lower costs. Many weld data monitoring initiatives failed because piles of data were generated, but the effort needed to convert data into actionable information was too much. The ultimate goal of welding information should be to fuel decision-making designed to increase productivity, improve quality, and lower operating costs. There are both fully integrated and third-party solutions available on the market today. Systems fully integrated into the power source offer seamless integration and minimal startup time, while third-party systems are advantageous for established welding power supply fleets without the option of a built-in solution. Ethernet networks are essentially the norm in many manufacturing.


A unique, homemade grill can be developed by following 11 easy-to-understand steps. On one piece of 36-in., one-one third inches, tubing, drill two 5/16-in. holes starting 1 in. from each end, spaced 1 in. apart, and weld in 5/16-in. nuts. On the same side as the holes, weld one and half inches, square tubing to the center of the tube. Weld the remaining two pieces of the one and half inches, square tubing to the ends of the two pieces of one-one third inches, square tubing. Piece together completed sides to finish the base. Assemble to the base and firmly snug all bolts. Saw the corners of the angles to 45 degree. Weld the square frame together. Weld one and half inches, square to the center of the 211/4-in. side. Drill two 1/4-in, holes in the 13/4-in, square tubing 2 in. apart for the handles. Weld one and half inches, square to the opposite ends of the holes. Bend three pieces of 1/8-in. square rod to form hooks and weld to the side for cooking utensils. Drill a 1/4-in, hole in the center of each dowel end. Pound the rods into place to create handles.


Rappl J.,Miller Electrical Manufacturing Co.
Manufacturing Engineering | Year: 2015

Remote control welding technology allows welding operators to set welding parameters at the joint without the need to carry, route, troubleshoot, and maintain expensive control cables, while delivering consistent welding performance. The single set of welding parameters enables the welding operator to stay where the welding is done, reducing the need to access controls in inconvenient locations. Remote control welding technology also enables the welding operator to set welding parameters at the arc without a control cord and without the using wireless controls that require batteries or line-of-sight for operation.


Robedeaux J.,Miller Electrical Manufacturing Co.
Welding Journal | Year: 2015

Welding plays a significant role in the completion of deadline-driven construction projects in the power generation industry. More proficient welding processes also make it easier for contractors to maximize the available skilled labor pool and complete jobs on time. To address both the welding operator shortage and the deadline-driven nature of power generation projects, some industry leaders are converting to advanced wire welding such as Regulated Metal Deposition (RMD) from Miller Electric Mfg. Co. and flux-cored welding processes for welding in the field and reaping the benefits. Precisely controlled metal transfer provides uniform droplet deposition, making it easier for the welding operator to control the puddle. Another solution that provides significant productivity and quality benefits is remote welding technology, which allows welding operators to make adjustments quickly and easily at the weld joint. These solutions can help contractors better adapt to challenges facing the industry and establish a more competitive, productive welding operation.

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