Millennium Inorganic Chemicals

Glen Burnie, MD, United States

Millennium Inorganic Chemicals

Glen Burnie, MD, United States
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MarketStudyReport.com adds “Global Vinyl Acetate Sales Market Report 2016” new report to its research database. The report spread across 129 pages with table and figures in it. This report studies sales (consumption) of Vinyl Acetate in Global market, especially in USA, China, Europe, Japan, India and Southeast Asia, focuses on top players in these regions/countries, with sales, price, revenue and market share for each player in these regions, covering Browse full table of contents and data tables at https://www.marketstudyreport.com/reports/global-vinyl-acetate-sales-market-report-2016/ Market Segment by Regions, this report splits Global into several key Regions, with sales (consumption), revenue, market share and growth rate of Vinyl Acetate in these regions, from 2011 to 2021 (forecast), like Split by product Types, with sales, revenue, price and gross margin, market share and growth rate of each type, can be divided into Split by applications, this report focuses on sales, market share and growth rate of Vinyl Acetate in each application, can be divided into 9 Global Vinyl Acetate Manufacturers Analysis 9.1 Calanese Corporation 9.1.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Competitors 9.1.2 Vinyl Acetate Product Type, Application and Specification 9.1.2.1 Type I 9.1.2.2 Type II 9.1.3 Calanese Corporation Vinyl Acetate Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016) 9.1.4 Main Business/Business Overview 9.2 Arkema 9.2.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Competitors 9.2.2 129 Product Type, Application and Specification 9.2.2.1 Type I 9.2.2.2 Type II 9.2.3 Arkema Vinyl Acetate Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016) 9.2.4 Main Business/Business Overview 9.3 DOW 9.3.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Competitors 9.3.2 144 Product Type, Application and Specification 9.3.2.1 Type I 9.3.2.2 Type II 9.3.3 DOW Vinyl Acetate Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016) 9.3.4 Main Business/Business Overview 9.4 BASF 9.4.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Competitors 9.4.2 Sept Product Type, Application and Specification 9.4.2.1 Type I 9.4.2.2 Type II 9.4.3 BASF Vinyl Acetate Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016) 9.4.4 Main Business/Business Overview 9.5 Clariant 9.5.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Competitors 9.5.2 Product Type, Application and Specification 9.5.2.1 Type I 9.5.2.2 Type II 9.5.3 Clariant Vinyl Acetate Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016) 9.5.4 Main Business/Business Overview 9.6 Dupont 9.6.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Competitors 9.6.2 Million USD Product Type, Application and Specification 9.6.2.1 Type I 9.6.2.2 Type II 9.6.3 Dupont Vinyl Acetate Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016) 9.6.4 Main Business/Business Overview 9.7 Kuraray 9.7.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Competitors 9.7.2 Chemical & Material Product Type, Application and Specification 9.7.2.1 Type I 9.7.2.2 Type II 9.7.3 Kuraray Vinyl Acetate Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016) 9.7.4 Main Business/Business Overview 9.8 Wacker 9.8.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Competitors 9.8.2 Product Type, Application and Specification 9.8.2.1 Type I 9.8.2.2 Type II 9.8.3 Wacker Vinyl Acetate Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016) 9.8.4 Main Business/Business Overview 9.9 Infineum International 9.9.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Competitors 9.9.2 Product Type, Application and Specification 9.9.2.1 Type I 9.9.2.2 Type II 9.9.3 Infineum International Vinyl Acetate Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016) 9.9.4 Main Business/Business Overview 9.10 Exxon Mobil Corporation 9.10.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Competitors 9.10.2 Product Type, Application and Specification 9.10.2.1 Type I 9.10.2.2 Type II 9.10.3 Exxon Mobil Corporation Vinyl Acetate Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016) 9.10.4 Main Business/Business Overview 9.11 Nippon Synthetic Chemical 9.12 Innospec Inc. 9.13 Lyondellbasell 9.14 Sinopec Corporation 9.15 Crown Chemical 9.16 Adarsh Chemicals 9.17 Millennium Inorganic Chemicals 9.18 Saudi International Petrochemical Company 9.19 Viraj Industries 9.20 Joyce Lub and Chem 9.21 Al Alameen Ltd. 9.22 S.S.M. Company To receive personalized assistance write to us @ [email protected] with the report title in the subject line along with your questions or call us at +1 866-764-2150


Nightingale A.M.,Imperial College London | Bannock J.H.,Imperial College London | Krishnadasan S.H.,Imperial College London | O'Mahony F.T.F.,Imperial College London | And 5 more authors.
Journal of Materials Chemistry A | Year: 2013

We report a multichannel microfluidic droplet reactor for the large-scale, high temperature synthesis of nanocrystals. The reactor was applied here to the production of CdTe, CdSe and alloyed CdSeTe nanocrystals, and found in all cases to provide high quality quantum dots with spectral properties that did not vary between channels or over time. One hour test runs yielded 3.7, 1.5 and 2.1 g of purified CdTe, CdSe and the alloy, respectively, using 0.4 M cadmium precursor solutions and carrier and reagent phase flow rates of 4 and 2 ml min -1. A further nine hour test-run applied to CdTe, utilizing increased carrier and reagent flow rates of 5 and 3 ml min-1, yielded 54.4 g of dry purified material, corresponding to a production rate of 145 g per day. The reactor architecture is inherently scalable and, with only minimal modifications, should allow for straightforward expansion to the kilogram-per-day production levels sought by industry. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.


News Article | November 9, 2016
Site: www.theguardian.com

A global chemical company has been fined for poor operational practices that killed one of its employees and seriously hurt another when they were overcome by a toxic vapour cloud. Cristal Pigment UK Ltd was sentenced at Hull Crown Court on 8 November for two incidents that occurred within less than two years at Europe’s largest titanium dioxide plant at Stallingborough in north-east Lincolnshire. The company, which was formerly known as Millennium Inorganic Chemicals, is part of the Cristal Group, a leading international producer of titanium chemicals. Titanium dioxide is widely used as a cheap white pigment but the European Chemicals Agency recently consulted on plans to declare it a respiratory carcinogen. The court heard that, in the early hours of 5 March 2010, there was a build-up of titanium tetrachloride – an intermediate in the process to produce titanium oxide - within a vessel. The chemical came into contact with water creating a violent reaction, which ruptured the vessel. The liquid came into contact with the air creating a large toxic vapour cloud. One worker was showered with the corrosive liquid and died several days later. His colleague was covered by the vapour cloud, surviving his injuries but with irreversible lung damage. The vapour cloud poured out from the site, blew out across the river Humber and closed down shipping lanes for several hours, until the incident was brought under control by the Humberside Fire and Rescue Service. An investigation by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) found the company had deviated from normal operating procedures, which led to the dangerous build-up of the chemical. Parts of the plant and its procedures were poorly designed and the company had not established robust safety management procedures and systems of work to assess and control risk and to ensure these were actually followed. The following year, on 27 July 2011, there was another uncontrolled release of a toxic vapour during the cleaning of a redundant vessel. The vessel, which is normally connected to the chemical production plant, was being replaced. The old vessel was removed and stored, for around three-years, with several tonnes of residual titanium tetrachloride. The HSE’s investigation found that Cristal had poorly managed the design and installation of fabricated plates to seal the vessel before carrying out the cleaning process. The plates were incompatible, incorrectly designed and used inappropriate sealants that could not contain the gas created during the procedure, releasing a toxic vapour cloud. Cristal Pigment UK pleaded guilty to breaching sections 2(1) and 3(1) of the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974 for the 2010 incident and also regulation 4 of the Control of Major Accident Hazards Regulations 1999 for the 2011 incident. It was fined £2.4m for the first case and £600,000 for the second, with £37,868 costs. After the hearing, HSE inspector Brian Fotheringham noted that, if the wind had been blowing in the opposite direction the 2010 incident “could also have caused a local disaster”. “However, the company still did not learn lessons from the 2010 incident and had another significant release of the same toxic gas just over a year later,” he said. “This case must act as a reminder to the industry that there can be no room for complacency when dealing with such dangerous chemicals.” When asked why the prosecution had taken so long to conclude, the HSE noted that the incident very complicated and required input from a large number of specialist disciplines. The judge himself had said that “no criticism can, or should, be made for the delay. The investigation has been a mammoth task for the HSE.” Rob Sarracini, Cristal’s Stallingborough site director, said the company was “extremely sorry for the failings that took place” which had a significant impact on many of the plant’s employees. “Our plant in Stallingborough is a highly complex and specialized manufacturing process. Immediately following the incident, we worked closely with the HSE, cooperating fully. Following both the HSE’s and our own investigations, it was found that there were deficiencies and we accept responsibility for these failings. We have taken the learnings and made significant improvements in many areas of our site.”


Chapman D.M.,Millennium Inorganic Chemicals | Fu G.,Millennium Inorganic Chemicals | Augustine S.,Millennium Inorganic Chemicals | Watson M.,Millennium Inorganic Chemicals | And 3 more authors.
SAE International Journal of Fuels and Lubricants | Year: 2010

Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) of NOx using reductants such as urea continues to be of high interest to meet impending regulations. Vanadia supported on anatase titania is a well-established catalyst for stationary and heavy-duty-diesel truck deNO x applications. However, traditional anatase titania-based materials are regarded to have limited thermal stability in the most demanding applications such as those where the SCR catalyst is located downstream of a regenerating DPF, in which the catalyst could be exposed to very high temperatures. More recently, state-of-the-art titania-based vanadia catalysts have shown good cold-start performance and are capable of surviving accelerated aging treatments of up to 64 hrs at 670°C [1], good performance in a configuration upstream of a DOC/DPF [2], good low temperature NO x conversion on par with Cu-zeolite SCR catalysts and superior resistance to sulfur poisoning [3]. We report here new, highly engineered titania-based materials with substantially improved stability and/or activity compared to the state-of-the-art commercial titania-based vanadia SCR catalysts. New synthetic approaches were used to prepare catalyst support materials that are predominantly anatase TiO 2 in composition. The thermal and hydrothermal stabilities of the new materials were characterized using a combination of x-ray powder diffraction with Rietveld Refinement, transmission and scanning electron microscopies, and N 2 porosimetry. Vanadia-loaded catalysts in powder form were thermally- or hydrothermally-aged and evaluated for NO conversion activity and selectivity in model-gas bench-scale reactors using NH 3 as the reductant, and were compared to commercial titania-based vanadia powders. The new materials fall into two classes. In the first, the materials exhibit substantially improved thermal stability, anatase phase stability and higher porosity, while exhibiting deNO x activity comparable to commercial materials. In the second class, the activity and stability of the new materials can be tuned to yield higher deNO x activity, particularly after exposure to high temperatures, while maintaining crystal phase stability and porosity at least as good as that of state-of-the art commercial titania-based vanadia catalysts. In a bench test under severe conditions that simulate lifetime catalyst exposure, no detectable vanadium is lost from the new catalysts to the vapor phase. The new, highly engineered materials should provide the catalyst formulator with new options to achieve robust and active SCR systems. © 2010 SAE International.

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