Begin University Military Hospital

Le Touquet – Paris-Plage, France

Begin University Military Hospital

Le Touquet – Paris-Plage, France
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Bonnet S.,Begin University Military Hospital | Douard R.,Avicenne University Hospital | Douard R.,Paris Nord University | Malamut G.,Georges Pompidou European University Hospital | And 5 more authors.
Digestive and Liver Disease | Year: 2013

Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding has long been a diagnostic challenge because of the relative inaccessibility of small bowel to standard endoscopic evaluation. Intraoperative enteroscopy indications have been reduced by the development of deep enteroscopy techniques and video capsule endoscopy. In light of the current advances, this review aimed at evaluating the intraoperative enteroscopy technical aspects, study results and an ongoing role for intraoperative enteroscopy in obscure gastrointestinal bleeding management. Intraoperative enteroscopy allows complete small bowel exploration in 57-100% of cases. A bleeding source can be identified in 80% of cases. Main causes are vascular lesions (61%) and benign ulcers (19%). When a lesion is found, intraoperative enteroscopy allows successful and recurrence-free management of gastrointestinal bleeding in 76% of cases. The reported mortality is 5% and morbidity is 17%. The recurrence of bleeding is observed in 13-52% of cases. With the recent development of deep enteroscopy techniques, intraoperative enteroscopy remains indicated when small bowel lesions (i) have been identified by a preoperative work-up, (ii) cannot be definitively managed by angiographic embolization, endoscopic treatment or when surgery is required and (iii) cannot be localized by external examination during surgical explorations. Surgeons and endoscopists must exercise caution with intraoperative enteroscopy to avoid the use of a low yield, highly morbid procedure. © 2012 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l.


Savoie P.-H.,University of Sainte-Anne | Abdalla S.,Begin University Military Hospital | Bordes J.,University of Sainte-Anne | Laroche J.,University of Sainte-Anne | And 3 more authors.
Hernia | Year: 2014

Purpose: Giant inguinoscrotal hernias represent a real public health problem in the Ivory Coast that can dramatically impair patients' quality of life. Limited resources require a simplified surgical strategy including, in our experience, not using a mesh and leaving the distal hernia sac. The aim of this study was to evaluate the benefits of this technique in terms of complications (seroma, haematoma, trophic troubles) and the ability to recover from surgery and return to work at 1 month postsurgery. Methods: Between January and May 2012, all patients who presented with a giant primary inguinoscrotal hernia that was spontaneously reducible in the decubitus position and who did not have any trophic changes in the scrotal skin were prospectively studied. The surgical procedure was a herniorrhaphy as described by Bassini. All patients received follow-up examinations on postoperative days 5, 12 and 30. Results: Twenty-five males with a median age of 42 years (range 18-60) underwent surgery. Three patients (12 %) presented with a superficial skin infection and four (16 %) with early scrotal swelling without seroma, spontaneously resolved by postoperative day 30. Three patients (12 %) presented with scrotal swelling and seroma; two required aspiration. No early recurrence was observed at the end of follow-up, and all patients were able to return to work. Conclusion: Leaving the distal hernial sac in the scrotum does not interfere with the type of hernia repair and can limit the occurrence of complications. This technique is reliable, reproducible and does not incur additional morbidity when used in selected patients. © 2013 Springer-Verlag France.


Abdalla S.,Begin University Military Hospital | Thome A.,Begin University Military Hospital | Reslinger V.,Begin University Military Hospital | Atanasiu C.,Begin University Military Hospital | And 3 more authors.
Surgical Laparoscopy, Endoscopy and Percutaneous Techniques | Year: 2015

Single-port laparoscopic cholecystectomy is considered as a form of natural orifice surgery with better esthetic outcomes than traditional laparoscopic cholecystectomy. It is a technically demanding procedure, and no adequately powered trial has assessed the safety of this technique. Vascular injuries are less common than bile duct injuries during this procedure, but they can be rapidly fatal. The development of a right hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm is a rare but serious complication associated with single-port laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Two weeks following a single-port laparoscopic cholecystectomy for angiocholitis, a 40-year-old male patient presented with obstructive jaundice and persistent abdominal pain. The diagnosis of compressive hematoma due to a ruptured right hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm was confirmed by computed tomography scan and angiography. It was successfully treated by selective embolization of the right hepatic artery. In our experience, endovascular management was a noninvasive and effective treatment of ruptured pseudoaneurysms. © 2014 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.


PubMed | Begin University Military Hospital
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Digestive and liver disease : official journal of the Italian Society of Gastroenterology and the Italian Association for the Study of the Liver | Year: 2013

Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding has long been a diagnostic challenge because of the relative inaccessibility of small bowel to standard endoscopic evaluation. Intraoperative enteroscopy indications have been reduced by the development of deep enteroscopy techniques and video capsule endoscopy. In light of the current advances, this review aimed at evaluating the intraoperative enteroscopy technical aspects, study results and an ongoing role for intraoperative enteroscopy in obscure gastrointestinal bleeding management. Intraoperative enteroscopy allows complete small bowel exploration in 57-100% of cases. A bleeding source can be identified in 80% of cases. Main causes are vascular lesions (61%) and benign ulcers (19%). When a lesion is found, intraoperative enteroscopy allows successful and recurrence-free management of gastrointestinal bleeding in 76% of cases. The reported mortality is 5% and morbidity is 17%. The recurrence of bleeding is observed in 13-52% of cases. With the recent development of deep enteroscopy techniques, intraoperative enteroscopy remains indicated when small bowel lesions (i) have been identified by a preoperative work-up, (ii) cannot be definitively managed by angiographic embolization, endoscopic treatment or when surgery is required and (iii) cannot be localized by external examination during surgical explorations. Surgeons and endoscopists must exercise caution with intraoperative enteroscopy to avoid the use of a low yield, highly morbid procedure.

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