Military Hospital Vienna

Vienna, Austria

Military Hospital Vienna

Vienna, Austria
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Poeppl W.,Medical University of Vienna | Poeppl W.,Military Hospital Vienna | Weiler M.,Federal Ministry of Defence and Sports | Burgmann H.,Medical University of Vienna | And 8 more authors.
Parasitology Research | Year: 2013

The possible existence of autochthonous sandfly populations in Central Europe north of the Alps has long been excluded. However, in the past years, sandflies have been documented in Germany, Belgium, and recently, also in Austria, close to the Slovenian border. Moreover, autochthonous human Leishmania and Phlebovirus infections have been reported in Central Europe, particularly in Germany. From 2010 to 2012, sandfly trapping (740 trap nights) was performed at 53 different capture sites in Austria using battery-operated CDC miniature light traps. Sites were chosen on the basis of their climate profile in the federal states Styria, Burgenland, and Lower Austria. Sandfly specimens found were transferred to 70 % ethanol for conservation. Identification was based on morphological characters of the male genitalia and the female spermathecae, respectively. Altogether, 24 specimens, 22 females and 2 males, all identified as Phlebotomus (Transphlebotomus) mascittii Grassi, 1908, were found at six different sampling sites in all three federal states investigated. The highest number of catches was made on a farm in Lower Austria. Altogether, the period of sandfly activity in Austria was shown to be much longer than presumed, the earliest capture was made on July 3rd and the latest on August 28th. Sandflies have been autochthonous in Austria in small foci probably for long, but in the course of global warming, further spreading may be expected. Although P. mascittii is only an assumed vector of Leishmania spp. - data on its experimental transmission capacity are still lacking - the wide distribution of sandflies in Austria, a country thought to be free of sandflies, further supports a potential emergence of sandflies in Central Europe. This is of medical relevance, not only with respect to the transmission of Leishmania spp. for which a reservoir is given in dogs, but also with respect to the phleboviruses. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


Poeppl W.,Medical University of Vienna | Poeppl W.,Regional Hospital Kirchdorf An der Krems | Hell M.,University of Salzburg | Herkner H.,Medical University of Vienna | And 9 more authors.
Infection | Year: 2011

Purpose To describe the clinical features, risk factors for severe disease and effectiveness of oseltamivir in patients with 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus infection. Methods In a prospective, cross-sectional, multicentre study, data on 540 patients with confirmed 2009 H1N1 infection from seven Austrian hospitals were collected using a standardised online case-history form. Results The median age of the patients was 19.3 years (range 26 days-90.8 years); point-of-care testing yielded false-negative results in 60.2% of the 176 cases tested. The most common symptoms were fever, cough, fatigue and headache. Overall, 343 patients (63.5%) were hospitalised, 49 (9.1%) were admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) and 14 (4.1%) died. Case fatality rates were highest (9.1%) in those aged 65 years or older. Factors significantly associated with a higher risk for ICU admission included age, neurological disease, adipositas, and both interstitial pathology and lobular pathology on chest X-ray. No association with pregnancy, malignancy or immunosuppressive therapy was detected. Antiviral treatment significantly reduced the duration of fever by 0.66 days and lowered the risk of ICU admission, but had no significant benefit on survival. Conclusions During the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic, elderly or obese patients and those with neurological disease had an increased risk for severe H1N1 infection in Austria. Pregnancy was not associated with a higher risk for severe disease in the later phase of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic. Antiviral treatment provided a minimal effect on the symptoms of influenza but reduced the risk of admission to an ICU. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.


Poeppl W.,Medical University of Vienna | Poeppl W.,Military Hospital Vienna | Orola M.J.,FH Campus Wien, University of Applied Sciences | Herkner H.,Medical University of Vienna | And 6 more authors.
Eurosurveillance | Year: 2013

To assess the distribution of specific antibodies against Leptospira spp. in Austrian adults, we conducted an explorative nationwide cross-sectional serological study in 400 healthy individuals. Antibody titres against Leptospira spp. were determined in a microscopic agglutination test using a panel of 14 serovar cultures. Sera of 18 participants were excluded because the samples were unsuitable for testing; the remaining 382 participants comprised 166 professional soldiers and 216 civilians. Overall, 88 (23%) individuals tested positive in serological screening. The subjects' sera reacted most frequently with serovars Canicola (16.5%) and Hardjo (11.8%). Epidemiological information was obtained from a questionnaire: no correlation was found for area of residence, travel abroad, regular outdoor activities, occupational animal contact, or ownership of companion animals. The proportion of seropositive samples was significantly lower among professional soldiers (15.7%) than among civilians (28.7%) (p=0.003). Our data demonstrate serological evidence of a high rate of exposure to Leptospira spp. among the Austrian population. No increased risk of exposure to Leptospira spp. was detected in military personnel. © 2007-2013. All rights reserved.


PubMed | FH Campus Wien, University of Applied Sciences, Austrian Agency for Health and Food Safety, Military Hospital Vienna and Medical University of Vienna
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Ticks and tick-borne diseases | Year: 2014

The prevalence of Coxiella burnetii, Francisella tularensis, Brucella abortus, and Brucella melitensis infections in Austria and the exposure risk of military personnel were assessed in an exploratory nationwide cross-sectional seroprevalence survey in 526 healthy adult individuals, 222 of which were soldiers and 304 were civilians. Screening for IgA/IgG antibodies to C. burnetii (Phase I) and IgG/IgM antibodies to C. burnetii (Phase II), and to F. tularensis was done with commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. To detect antibodies against B. abortus and B. melitensis, an in-house complement fixation test was used. Overall, 11 individuals (2.0%) showed antibodies to C. burnetii, 3 individuals (0.5%) were seropositive for F. tularensis, and one (0.3%) individual was borderline positive. All individuals positive or borderline for F. tularensis tested negative for antibodies against C. burnetii. All individuals tested negative for antibodies against B. melitensis/B. abortus. There were no significant differences between the seroprevalence of C. burnetii and F. tularensis among military personnel and civilians. Our data demonstrate serological evidence of a low rate of exposure to C. burnetii and F. tularensis among the Austrian adult population and military personnel.


Poeppl W.,Military Hospital Vienna | Walochnik J.,Medical University of Vienna | Pustelnik T.,Military Hospital Vienna | Auer H.,Medical University of Vienna | Mooseder G.,Military Hospital Vienna
American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene | Year: 2011

A patient presenting with an atypical manifestation of cutaneous leishmaniasis after travel to Cyprus was successfully treated with miltefosine. The K26 typing revealed a hitherto undescribed strain of the Leishmania donovani/infantum complex as the causing agent. Copyright © 2011 by The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.


Poeppl W.,Medical University of Vienna | Poeppl W.,Military Hospital Vienna | Herkner H.,Medical University of Vienna | Burgmann H.,Medical University of Vienna | And 4 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2011

To investigate the diagnostic accuracy of the QuickVue® Influenza A+B rapid test we conducted a prospective observational study in which this rapid test was compared with a real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for pandemic influenza A H1N1 (2009) infection in Austrian adults. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of the QuickVue test compared with the RT-PCR were 26% (95% CI 18-35), 98% (95% CI 92-100), 94% (95% CI 80-99) and 50% (95% CI 42-58), respectively. The prevalence of pandemic H1N1 (2009) virus infection among the 209 patients included in the study was 57%. Our data suggest that a positive QuickVue test provides considerable information for the diagnosis of pandemic influenza A H1N1 (2009) virus infection in young adults but that a negative QuickVue test result should, if relevant for patient management or public health measures, be verified using PCR. © 2011 Poeppl et al.


Lagler H.,Medical University of Vienna | Poeppl W.,Medical University of Vienna | Poeppl W.,Military Hospital Vienna | Winkler H.,Medical University of Vienna | And 4 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2014

Background: Hepatitis E Virus (HEV) infection is globally increasing. The present study was performed to investigate the HEV seroprevalence, exposure risks as well as occupational risks for military personnel in Austria, a Central European country. Methods and Findings: A nationwide cross-sectional seroprevalence study was performed in 997 healthy Austrian adults, professional soldiers and civilians. Routine laboratory and HEV specific antibodies were determined. In addition, epidemiological information on possible risk factors for exposure to HEV was obtained. The overall seropositivity for HEV antibodies was 14.3% and significantly increased with age. Seroprevalence was significantly higher among individuals with previous military employments abroad (21.4% vs. 9.9%) and among professional soldiers aged 30-39 years (20.2% vs. 7.3%). No association was found for private travel, occupational or private animal contact or regular outdoor activities. Individuals who tested positive for antibodies against HEV had significantly higher laboratory values regarding liver enzymes, lipid levels and blood fasting glucose. Conclusions: Exposure to HEV is common in Austria. Military employment abroad could be a potential risk factor for HEV infection. Further studies are required to investigate the significance of pathological laboratory results found among asymptomatic individuals previously exposed to HEV. © 2014 Lagler et al.


Poeppl W.,Medical University of Vienna | Poeppl W.,Military Hospital Vienna | Herkner H.,Medical University of Vienna | Tobudic S.,Medical University of Vienna | And 4 more authors.
Vector-Borne and Zoonotic Diseases | Year: 2013

Despite emerging risks for the spread of zoonotic diseases, data on human exposure to Echinococcus multilocularis and Toxocara spp., the causative parasites of the two most important helminthozoonoses in Central Europe, are limited. To investigate risk factors and exposure, we conducted a nationwide, cross-sectional serological study in 1046 healthy individuals, of which 425 were soldiers and 621 were civilians. Serum samples and information on possible risk factors for exposure, including previous foreign military assignments, residential area, animal contact, and regular outdoor activities, were obtained. Immunoglobulin G antibodies against Echinococcus multilocularis and Toxocara spp. were examined with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Samples reactive in the ELISA for antibodies against Echinococcus multilocularis were considered positive only after confirmation by western blot. Overall, 66 (6.3%) individuals tested positive in the serologic screening for Toxocara spp. Occupational animal contact was the only risk factor significantly associated with a higher risk for being seropositive. None of the individuals were positive for antibodies against Echinococcus multilocularis. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that exposure to Toxocara spp. is widespread in Austria and occupational animal contact is a risk factor for seropositivity. © 2013 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.


Poeppl W.,Medical University of Vienna | Poeppl W.,Military Hospital Vienna | Herkner H.,Medical University of Vienna | Tobudic S.,Medical University of Vienna | And 5 more authors.
Clinical Microbiology and Infection | Year: 2013

Clin Microbiol Infect Leishmaniasis is a rare disease in Central Europe and is diagnosed almost exclusively in travellers or migrants coming from tropical or subtropical countries. We conducted an explorative cross-sectional serological study, using a commercial ELISA, in 1048 healthy Austrian individuals to assess the distribution of specific antibodies against Leishmania spp. in humans in Austria. Overall, 47 individuals (4.5%) tested positive, and an additional 32 (3.1%) showed borderline results. After 12months, sera from 42 of the 79 individuals who had initially tested seropositive/borderline were tested by ELISA a second time: 18 were persistently positive, nine were borderline. Those whose sera were persistently positive/borderline were then screened for potential carrier status using a commercial oligochromatographic PCR test to detect parasite DNA. Four samples were PCR positive and were subjected to a second PCR allowing parasite identification after DNA sequencing: two samples were identified as Leishmania donovani/infantum complex and Leishmania (Viannia) guyanensis, respectively. Epidemiological information was obtained with a questionnaire: no correlation was found for the number of holiday trips within the previous 6months, but a significant risk of exposure to Leishmania spp. was found for travel to the New World, particularly to the Caribbean. Our data demonstrate that Leishmania spp. seroprevalence in non-endemic countries has been considerably underestimated. © 2012 The Authors. Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2012 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.


PubMed | Military Hospital Vienna and Medical University of Vienna
Type: Journal Article | Journal: PloS one | Year: 2014

Hepatitis E Virus (HEV) infection is globally increasing. The present study was performed to investigate the HEV seroprevalence, exposure risks as well as occupational risks for military personnel in Austria, a Central European country.A nationwide cross-sectional seroprevalence study was performed in 997 healthy Austrian adults, professional soldiers and civilians. Routine laboratory and HEV specific antibodies were determined. In addition, epidemiological information on possible risk factors for exposure to HEV was obtained. The overall seropositivity for HEV antibodies was 14.3% and significantly increased with age. Seroprevalence was significantly higher among individuals with previous military employments abroad (21.4% vs. 9.9%) and among professional soldiers aged 30-39 years (20.2% vs. 7.3%). No association was found for private travel, occupational or private animal contact or regular outdoor activities. Individuals who tested positive for antibodies against HEV had significantly higher laboratory values regarding liver enzymes, lipid levels and blood fasting glucose.Exposure to HEV is common in Austria. Military employment abroad could be a potential risk factor for HEV infection. Further studies are required to investigate the significance of pathological laboratory results found among asymptomatic individuals previously exposed to HEV.

Loading Military Hospital Vienna collaborators
Loading Military Hospital Vienna collaborators