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Pommier de Santi V.,Military Center for Epidemiology and Public Health | Djossou F.,Direction Interarmees du Service de Sante en Guyane | Djossou F.,CEA DAM Ile-de-France | Djossou F.,Andree Rosemon Hospital | And 23 more authors.
Emerging Infectious Diseases | Year: 2016

To assess the prevalence of malaria among illegal gold miners in the French Guiana rainforest, we screened 205 miners during May–June 2014. Malaria prevalence was 48.3%; 48.5% of cases were asymptomatic. Patients reported self-medication with artemisinin-based combination therapy. Risk for emergence and spread of artemisinin resistance among gold miners in the rainforest is high. © 2016, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). All Rights reserved.


Pohl J.-B.,Fort Neuf de Vincennes | Mayet A.,Military Center for Epidemiology and Public Health | Bedubourg G.,Military Center for Epidemiology and Public Health | Duron S.,Military Center for Epidemiology and Public Health | And 6 more authors.
Military Medicine | Year: 2014

Objective: The main objective of this study was to evaluate the contribution of a newly implemented daily surveillance system to the management of the 2009 A(H1N1) influenza pandemic by the military decision-makers at different levels in the French Department of Defense. Methods: The study sample included all medical advisors in the Ministry of Defense and the French Armed Forces Staff and also the members of the specific committee dedicated to flu pandemic control. The variables studied were mental representation of epidemiology, relevance, usefulness, and real time use of surveillance data using quantitative questionnaires and qualitative face-to-face semi structured interviews. Results: Among the risk managers of the flu pandemic in the Armed Forces, 84% responded. The data generated by epidemiological surveillance were considered relevant and useful, and were reported as effectively used. On the basis of the information produced, concrete actions were planned and implemented in the French Armed Forces. Conclusion: In a pandemic situation involving low mortality, the daily monitoring of the disease did not target public health issues, but it was mainly used to assess the availability of the Armed Forces in real time. For the military staff, epidemiological surveillance represents an essential information tool for the conduct of operations. © Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S. All rights reserved.


PubMed | Military Center for Epidemiology and Public Health, Begin Military Teaching Hospital, DoD and University Paris Est Creteil
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Military medicine | Year: 2014

The main objective of this study was to evaluate the contribution of a newly implemented daily surveillance system to the management of the 2009 A(H1N1) influenza pandemic by the military decision-makers at different levels in the French Department of Defence.The study sample included all medical advisors in the Ministry of Defence and the French Armed Forces Staff and also the members of the specific committee dedicated to flu pandemic control. The variables studied were mental representation of epidemiology, relevance, usefulness, and real-time use of surveillance data using quantitative questionnaires and qualitative face-to-face semistructured interviews.Among the risk managers of the flu pandemic in the Armed Forces, 84% responded. The data generated by epidemiological surveillance were considered relevant and useful, and were reported as effectively used. On the basis of the information produced, concrete actions were planned and implemented in the French Armed Forces.In a pandemic situation involving low mortality, the daily monitoring of the disease did not target public health issues, but it was mainly used to assess the availability of the Armed Forces in real time. For the military staff, epidemiological surveillance represents an essential information tool for the conduct of operations.


Bouzad C.,Percy Military Teaching Hospital | Duron S.,Military Center for Epidemiology and Public Health | Bousquet A.,Begin Military Teaching Hospital | Arnaud F.-X.,Percy Military Teaching Hospital | And 5 more authors.
CardioVascular and Interventional Radiology | Year: 2016

Purpose: To determine the incidence and the risks factors of peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC)-related infectious complications. Materials and Methods: Medical charts of every in-patient that underwent a PICC insertion in our hospital between January 2010 and October 2013 were reviewed. All PICC-related infections were recorded and categorized as catheter-related bloodstream infections (CR-BSI), exit-site infections, and septic thrombophlebitis. Results: Nine hundred and twenty-three PICCs were placed in 644 unique patients, mostly male (68.3 %) with a median age of 58 years. 31 (3.4 %) PICC-related infections occurred during the study period corresponding to an infection rate of 1.64 per 1000 catheter-days. We observed 27 (87.1 %) CR-BSI, corresponding to a rate of 1.43 per 1000 catheter-days, 3 (9.7 %) septic thrombophlebitis, and 1 (3.2 %) exit-site infection. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed a higher PICC-related infection rate with chemotherapy (odds ratio (OR) 7.2–confidence interval (CI) 95 % [1.77–29.5]), auto/allograft (OR 5.9–CI 95 % [1.2–29.2]), and anti-coagulant therapy (OR 2.2–95 % [1.4–12]). Conclusion: Chemotherapy, auto/allograft, and anti-coagulant therapy are associated with an increased risk of developing PICC-related infections. Clinical Advance: Chemotherapy, auto/allograft, and anti-coagulant therapy are important predictors of PICC-associated infections. A careful assessment of these risk factors may be important for future success in preventing PICC-related infections. © 2015, Springer Science+Business Media New York and the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE).

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