Fairfield, AL, United States
Fairfield, AL, United States

Miles College is a historically black college founded in 1898. It is located in Fairfield, Alabama, six miles west of Birmingham. It is a private liberal arts institution of the Christian Methodist Episcopal Church . Miles College is also a member of the United Negro College Fund. Wikipedia.

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News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

LearnHowToBecome.org, a leading resource provider for higher education and career information, has ranked the best universities and colleges in Alabama for 2017. Using government-backed data, the site found 27 four-year schools had the caliber to be on the list. Samford University, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Spring Hill College, Auburn University and University of Alabama in Huntsville came in as the top five. 26 two-year schools also made the list, with Enterprise State Community College, Gadsden State Community College, Wallace State Community College Hanceville, Southern Union State Community College and Lurleen B. Wallace Community College ranked as the best five. A full list of schools is included below. “Alabama currently has the third-highest unemployment rate in the country, but schools are working to combat that by providing quality higher education opportunities,” said Wes Ricketts, senior vice president of LearnHowToBecome.Org. “The colleges and universities on our list offer certificates, degrees and employment resources that best set students up for success in the workforce after school.” To be included on the Alabama’s “Best Colleges” list, schools must be regionally accredited, not-for-profit institutions. Each college is also appraised for additional data that includes employment services, student counseling, annual alumni salaries 10 years after entering college, student/teacher ratio, graduation rate and financial aid offerings. Complete details on each college, their individual scores and the data and methodology used to determine the LearnHowToBecome.org “Best Colleges in Alabama” list, visit: The Best Four-Year Colleges in Alabama for 2017 include: Alabama A & M University Alabama State University Amridge University Athens State University Auburn University Auburn University at Montgomery Birmingham Southern College Faulkner University Huntingdon College Jacksonville State University Judson College Miles College Oakwood University Samford University Spring Hill College Stillman College Talladega College The University of Alabama Troy University Tuskegee University University of Alabama at Birmingham University of Alabama in Huntsville University of Mobile University of Montevallo University of North Alabama University of South Alabama University of West Alabama The Best Two-Year Colleges in Alabama for 2017 include: Alabama Southern Community College Bevill State Community College Bishop State Community College Calhoun State Community College Central Alabama Community College Chattahoochee Valley Community College Enterprise State Community College Faulkner State Community College Gadsden State Community College H Councill Trenholm State Technical College J F Drake State Community and Technical College J F Ingram State Technical College Jefferson Davis Community College Jefferson State Community College Lawson State Community College-Birmingham Campus Lurleen B Wallace Community College Northeast Alabama Community College Northwest-Shoals Community College Reid State Technical College Remington College-Mobile Campus Shelton State Community College Snead State Community College Southern Union State Community College Wallace Community College - Dothan Wallace Community College - Selma Wallace State Community College - Hanceville About Us: LearnHowtoBecome.org was founded in 2013 to provide data and expert driven information about employment opportunities and the education needed to land the perfect career. Our materials cover a wide range of professions, industries and degree programs, and are designed for people who want to choose, change or advance their careers. We also provide helpful resources and guides that address social issues, financial aid and other special interest in higher education. Information from LearnHowtoBecome.org has proudly been featured by more than 700 educational institutions.


News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

"Having Mr. McMorris, an accomplished entrepreneur and national leader as commencement speaker, couldn't be more timely," stated SAU President Dr. Everett B. Ward. "As we celebrate the university's 150-year anniversary, it is critical that we focus on the defining pillars that cement the foundation of the university's future: entrepreneurship, STEM, public health and mass communications. Mr. McMorris' focus on the future and spirit of entrepreneurship is just what we need to invigorate a new, dynamic class of Falcon leaders." McMorris, CEO of the Washington, D.C.-based companies Perennial Strategy Group and Perennial Sports, and founding principal of Greenlining Realty USA, is often cited for his instrumental work in opening doors of opportunity through broad based coalition-building, and for his advocacy for diversity, access and inclusion. It's this style of leadership that he brings to the board room as an active trustee at Miles College and his alma mater Morehouse College, coupled with his passion for mentoring young men and women who often seek him out for his sage advice and approachable appeal, that has afforded him a unique perspective on the opportunities and challenges faced by secondary education institutions and college graduates alike. In his address, McMorris encouraged graduates to prepare for the new emerging technological world, to embrace their entrepreneurial passion, to honor and love their family, to stay connected to community, and to embrace their faith in God.  McMorris remarked, "We are faith. We are living, walking, breathing faith, and when you come to understand that you are the substance of things hoped for and the evidence of things not seen, then there's nothing you cannot do." Lamell McMorris is the founder and CEO of the Washington, DC based companies, Perennial Strategy Group and Perennial Sports. In his work, Mr. McMorris offers strategic insight and external affairs services to some of the nation's leading decision-makers in the private, public, and nonprofit sectors. In 2016, Mr. McMorris founded Greenlining Realty USA, a premier comprehensive urban property redevelopment firm with the mission to reverse the historic discriminatory practice of "redlining." As a lifelong advocate of civil, economic, and social rights, Mr. McMorris serves as a member on numerous nonprofit and college boards, and volunteers his time with several youth-focused and mentoring organizations. He is frequently recognized for his entrepreneurial leadership and pragmatic, high-impact approach to effective advocacy, and he is often invited to speak at a wide range of conferences and events. Mr. McMorris holds a Bachelor of Arts in Religion and Society from Morehouse College and a Master of Divinity in Social Ethics and Public Policy from Princeton Theological Seminary. Saint Augustine's University, established in 1867, is a four-year liberal arts university in Raleigh, N.C. With an average annual enrollment of 1,500, the University offers over 20 undergraduate degree programs in five academic divisions. Saint Augustine's University is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. The school's name and status changed from Saint Augustine's College to Saint Augustine's University August 1, 2012. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/lamell-mcmorris-delivers-saint-augustines-university-commencement-address-300458006.html


Banales J.M.,University of Navarra | Banales J.M.,Miles College | Banales J.M.,University of the Basque Country | Saez E.,University of Navarra | And 9 more authors.
Hepatology | Year: 2012

Cl -/HCO3- anion exchanger 2 (AE2) participates in intracellular pH homeostasis and secretin-stimulated biliary bicarbonate secretion. AE2/SLC4A2 gene expression is reduced in liver and blood mononuclear cells from patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). Our previous findings of hepatic and immunological features mimicking PBC in Ae2-deficient mice strongly suggest that decreased AE2 expression might be involved in the pathogenesis of PBC. Here, we tested the potential role of microRNA 506 (miR-506) - predicted as candidate to target AE2 mRNA - for the decreased expression of AE2 in PBC. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction showed that miR-506 expression is increased in PBC livers versus normal liver specimens. In situ hybridization in liver sections confirmed that miR-506 is up-regulated in the intrahepatic bile ducts of PBC livers, compared with normal and primary sclerosing cholangitis livers. Precursor-mediated overexpression of miR-506 in SV40-immortalized normal human cholangiocytes (H69 cells) led to decreased AE2 protein expression and activity, as indicated by immunoblotting and microfluorimetry, respectively. Moreover, miR-506 overexpression in three-dimensional (3D)-cultured H69 cholangiocytes blocked the secretin-stimulated expansion of cystic structures developed under the 3D conditions. Luciferase assays and site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that miR-506 specifically may bind the 3′untranslated region (3′UTR) of AE2 messenger RNA (mRNA) and prevent protein translation. Finally, cultured PBC cholangiocytes showed decreased AE2 activity, together with miR-506 overexpression, compared to normal human cholangiocytes, and transfection of PBC cholangiocytes with anti-miR-506 was able to improve their AE2 activity. Conclusion: miR-506 is up-regulated in cholangiocytes from PBC patients, binds the 3′UTR region of AE2 mRNA, and prevents protein translation, leading to diminished AE2 activity and impaired biliary secretory functions. In view of the putative pathogenic role of decreased AE2 in PBC, miR-506 may constitute a potential therapeutic target for this disease. © 2012 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

More than 54 colleges & universities including the Historic Black Colleges & Universities (HBCU) and several area middle and high schools will descend on the campus of Second Ebenezer Church February 24, 25 & 26, 2017 for a spectacular 20th Anniversary of College Weekend, announced Bishop Edgar L. Vann II today. In its 20th year, Second Ebenezer's College Weekend has awarded more than $400,000 in scholarships and has reached more than 7,000 high school students and young adults with the promise of higher education. New this year, a career fair sponsored by Ebsource, Second Ebenezer's workforce development program, is being added. Participants are encouraged to bring their resumes and learn about both internships and career opportunities at area employers. A celebration of Black History Month, hundreds of students and their families are anticipated to participate, and all are welcome. Organizer Elder James Johnson said, "This event helps to shape the future for many metro Detroit youth. We are reaching out to all high school students and their parents and encouraging them to plan early. Going to college is a family affair. Economics alone make it out-of-reach for many. From understanding the value of higher education to financing college and preparing for the ACT and SAT exams, we provide all the resources they need to succeed. As always, we will be giving away scholarships and offering on-site admissions," said Johnson. Hosted by Hot 107.5FM Host Kamal Smith & BET "Sunday Best" Finalist DeAgelo Gardner, more than 10 marching bands will compete for a cash prize of $500. Talented student musicians from Pershing High School, Cass Technical High School, Levi Middle School, Loving Academy Marching Band are among the schools that will entertain and compete at the Battle of the Bands! Tickets are $7.00 per person. On Saturday, February 25, from 10am-2pm, high school students, young adults and their families are invited to interface with 54 colleges from around the state and the country, as well as learn about financial aid, test preparation, student banking and a special workshop for parents as well. Admission is free and guests are encouraged to register online at http://www.secondebenezer.org. Participating colleges and universities include, but are not limited to: Alcorn State University, Bethune-Cookman, Central Michigan University, Eastern Michigan University, Grand Valley State, Hampton University, Knoxville College, Michigan State University, Michigan Technical University, Miles College, Morehouse College, Morgan State University, North Carolina A&T, Oakland Community College, Oakland University, Ohio State University, Ohio Technical College, Philander Smith College, Prairie View A&M University, Spelman College, Tennessee State University, University of Detroit Mercy, University of Michigan Dearborn, Wayne State University, Western Michigan University and Xavier University. College Weekend will close on Sunday with a major College Spirit Day Session led by DeAngelo Gardner of BET's "Sunday Best," at 10:00 a.m. Second Ebenezer Church is centrally located at 14601 Dequindre, at I-75 and McNIchols, in Detroit. Telephone 313.867.4700 and visit http://www.secondebenezer.org.


Escande C.,Rochester College | Escande C.,Institute Investigaciones Biologicas Clemente Estable | Chini C.C.S.,Rochester College | Nin V.,Rochester College | And 8 more authors.
Journal of Clinical Investigation | Year: 2010

The enzyme sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) is a critical regulator of many cellular functions, including energy metabolism. However, the precise mechanisms that modulate SIRT1 activity remain unknown. As SIRT1 activity in vitro was recently found to be negatively regulated by interaction with the deleted in breast cancer-1 (DBC1) protein, we set out to investigate whether DBC1 regulates SIRT1 activity in vivo. We found that DBC1 and SIRT1 colocalized and interacted, and that DBC1 modulated SIRT1 activity, in multiple cell lines and tissues. In mouse liver, increased SIRT1 activity, concomitant with decreased DBC1-SIRT1 interaction, was detected after 24 hours of starvation, whereas decreased SIRT1 activity and increased interaction with DBC1 was observed with high-fat diet (HFD) feeding. Consistent with the hypothesis that DBC1 is crucial for HFD-induced inhibition of SIRT1 and for the development of experimental liver steatosis, genetic deletion of Dbc1 in mice led to increased SIRT1 activity in several tissues, including liver. Furthermore, DBC1-deficient mice were protected from HFD-induced liver steatosis and inflammation, despite the development of obesity. These observations define what we believe to be a new role for DBC1 as an in vivo regulator of SIRT1 activity and liver steatosis. We therefore propose that the DBC1-SIRT1 interaction may serve as a new target for therapies aimed at non-alcoholic liver steatosis.


Larusso N.F.,Miles College | Larusso N.F.,Rochester College | Masyuk T.V.,Miles College
Digestive Diseases | Year: 2011

Cholangiocytes, the epithelial cells lining intrahepatic bile ducts, are ciliated cells. Each cholangiocyte has a primary cilium consisting of (i) a microtubule-based axoneme and (ii) the basal body, centriole-derived, microtubule-organizing center from which the axoneme emerges. Primary cilia in cholangiocytes were described decades ago, but their physiological and pathophysiological significance remained unclear until recently. We now recognize that cholangiocyte cilia extend from the apical plasma membrane into the bile duct lumen and, as such, are ideally positioned to detect changes in bile flow, bile composition and bile osmolality. These sensory organelles act as cellular antennae that can detect and transmit signals that influence cholangiocyte function. Indeed, recent data show that cholangiocyte primary cilia can activate intracellular signaling pathways when they sense modifications in the flow, molecular constituents and osmolarity of bile. Their ability to sense and transmit signals depends on the participation of a growing number of specific ciliary-associated proteins that act as receptors, channels and transporters. Cholangiocyte cilia, in addition to being important in normal biliary physiology, likely contribute to the cholangiopathies when their normal structure or function is disturbed. Indeed, the polycystic liver diseases that occur in combination with autosomal dominant and recessive polycystic kidney disease (i.e. ADPKD and ARPKD) are two important examples of such conditions. Recent insights into the role of cholangiocyte cilia in cystic liver disease using in vitro and animal models have already resulted in clinical trials that have influenced the management of cystic liver disease. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.


Yang J.D.,Miles College | Roberts L.R.,Miles College
Nature Reviews Gastroenterology and Hepatology | Year: 2010

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a global health problem, although developing countries are disproportionally affected: over 80% of HCCs occur in such regions. About three-quarters of HCCs are attributed to chronic HBV and HCV infections. In areas endemic for HCV and HBV, viral transmission occurs at an early age, and infected individuals develop HCC in mid-adulthood. As these are their most productive years of life, HCC accounts for a substantial burden on the health-care system and drain of productive capacity in the low-income and middle-income countries most affected by HCV and HBV infections. Environments with disparate resource levels require different strategies for the optimal management of HCC. In high-resource environments, guidelines from the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases or European Association for the Study of the Liver should be applied. In intermediate-resource or low-resource environments, the fundamental focus should be on primary prevention of HCC, through universal HBV vaccination, taking appropriate precautions and antiviral treatments. In intermediate-resource and low-resource environments, the infrastructure and capacity for abdominal ultrasonography, percutaneous ethanol injection, radiofrequency ablation and surgical resection should be established. Programs to provide targeted therapy at low cost, similar to the approach used for HIV therapy in the developing world, should be pursued. © 2010 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.


Yang J.D.,Miles College | Roberts L.R.,Miles College
Infectious Disease Clinics of North America | Year: 2010

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a major world health problem because of the high incidence and case fatality rate. In most patients, the diagnosis of HCC is made at an advanced stage, which limits the application of curative treatments. Most HCCs develop in patients with underlying chronic liver disease. Chronic viral hepatitis B and C are the major causes of liver cirrhosis and HCC. Recent improvements in treatment of viral hepatitis and in methods for surveillance and therapy for HCC have contributed to better survival of patients with HCC. This article reviews the epidemiology, cause, prevention, clinical manifestations, surveillance, diagnosis, and treatment approach for HCC. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

To support students going to and through college More than 800 business, civic, community and education leaders from across the Birmingham area in Alabama are expected to attend the 2017 UNCF Mayor’s Masked Ball on February 25, 2017 at the Birmingham-Jefferson Convention Complex. This annual event, hosted by Mayor William A. Bell, Sr. will focus on providing scholarship funds for area students and operating support to UNCF-member institutions, including Miles College, Oakwood University, Stillman College, Talladega College and Tuskegee University. “Education is critically important for the success of our children, perhaps the most important next-generation civil rights issue we face as a society,” said Mayor Bell. “With that in mind, anything we can do to help more students get the tools they need, we are happy to support and promote.” UNCF President and CEO Dr. Michael L. Lomax will deliver remarks. Jasmine Sanders, co-host of “The D.L. Hughley Show,” will serve as emcee at the event that will feature elegant dining, testimonials by scholarship recipients and entertainment provided by the the electrifying S.O.S. Band. UNCF recognizes community leaders for their dedication and support of UNCF’s work and their commitment to higher education. This year’s honorees include 2016 UNCF Birmingham Co-chairs, Drs. Robert and Jarralynne Agee, Dr. Peter Millet, former president of Stillman College, and long-term UNCF partner, American Cast Iron Pipe Company. Al Denson, Birmingham-area UNCF campaign chair and president & CEO of Birmingham Airport Authority, serves as honorary chair and Brian Bucher, PNC Financial Services regional president of Alabama serves as corporate chair for this event. Current sponsors include platinum sponsors American Cast Iron Pipe Company, PNC Financial Services; gold sponsors BBVA Compass, Birmingham Airport Authority, City of Birmingham, HMS Host, Mercedes Benz U.S. International, Regions Bank, Inc.; and many other silver and bronze sponsors. To purchase tickets, which are $250, please visit: uncf.org/birminghammayorsmaskedball or call Area Development Director Cheri Wilson at 205.322.8623. About UNCF UNCF (United Negro College Fund) is the nation’s largest and most effective minority education organization. To serve youth, the community and the nation, UNCF supports students’ education and development through scholarships and other programs, strengthens its 37 member colleges and universities, and advocates for the importance of minority education and college readiness. UNCF institutions and other historically black colleges and universities are highly effective, awarding nearly 20 percent of African American baccalaureate degrees. UNCF awards more than $100 million in scholarships annually and administers more than 400 programs, including scholarship, internship and fellowship, mentoring, summer enrichment, and curriculum and faculty development programs. Today, UNCF supports more than 60,000 students at more than 1,100 colleges and universities across the country. Its logo features the UNCF torch of leadership in education and its widely recognized motto, “A mind is a terrible thing to waste.”® Learn more at UNCF.org, or for continuous updates and news, follow UNCF on Twitter at @UNCF.


News Article | December 2, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

More than 100 business, civic, community and education leaders from across the Dothan-Wiregrass Area in Alabama are expected to attend the UNCF Dothan-Wiregrass Mayor’s Luncheon Dec. 9, 2016. This inaugural event, hosted by Mayor Mike Schmitz, will help provide scholarship funds for area students and operating support to UNCF-member institutions, including Miles College, Oakwood University, Tuskegee University, Stillman College and Talladega College. Dr. Brian Johnson, president of Tuskegee University, will deliver the keynote address. Dothan-Wiregrass UNCF campaign chair Darius McKay will serve as honorary chair. Early sponsors include Gold Sponsor MidSouth Bank and Bronze Sponsors, Alfred Saliba Construction, BBVA Compass, Eagle Eye Outfitters, Farley Nuclear Plant and Wells Fargo Bank. When: Friday, Dec. 9, 2016 Luncheon at 11:30 a.m. To purchase tickets, which are $50, please visit: Dothan Leaders' Luncheon or call Cheri Wilson at 205.322.8623. About UNCF UNCF (United Negro College Fund) is the nation’s largest and most effective minority education organization. To serve youth, the community and the nation, UNCF supports students’ education and development through scholarships and other programs, strengthens its 37 member colleges and universities, and advocates for the importance of minority education and college readiness. UNCF institutions and other historically black colleges and universities are highly effective, awarding nearly 20 percent of African American baccalaureate degrees. UNCF awards more than $100 million in scholarships annually and administers more than 400 programs, including scholarship, internship and fellowship, mentoring, summer enrichment, and curriculum and faculty development programs. Today, UNCF supports more than 60,000 students at more than 1,100 colleges and universities across the country. Its logo features the UNCF torch of leadership in education and its widely recognized motto, “A mind is a terrible thing to waste.”® Learn more at UNCF.org, or for continuous updates and news, follow UNCF on Twitter at @UNCF.

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