Mie Prefectural Museum

Tsu-shi, Japan

Mie Prefectural Museum

Tsu-shi, Japan
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Hori M.,Kyoto University | Nakajima M.,Stanford University | Hata H.,Ehime University | Yasugi M.,Japan National Institute for Basic Biology | And 11 more authors.
Zoological Science | Year: 2017

Laterality has been studied in several vertebrates, mainly in terms of brain lateralization and behavioral laterality, but morphological asymmetry has not been extensively investigated. Asymmetry in fishes was first described in scale-eating cichlids from Lake Tanganyika, in the form of bilateral dimorphism in which some individuals, when opening their mouths, twist them to the right and others to the left. This asymmetry has a genetic basis, and is correlated with lateralized attack behaviors. This has subsequently been found in fishes from numerous taxa with various feeding habits. The generality of such morphological laterality should thus be investigated in as wide a range of fishes as possible. Using specific indicators of lateral differences in mandibles and head inclination, we find that representative species from all 60 orders of extant gnathostome fishes (both bony and cartilaginous) possess morphological laterality. Furthermore, we identify the same laterality in agnathans (hagfish and lamprey), suggesting that this trait appeared early in fish evolution and has been maintained across fish lineages. However, a comparison of asymmetry among groups of bony fishes reveals, unexpectedly, that phylogenetically more recent-groups possess less asymmetry in body structures. The universality of laterality in fishes indicates a monophyletic origin, and may have been present in the ancestors of vertebrates. Ecological factors, predator-prey interactions in particular, may be key drivers in the evolution and maintenance of dimorphism, and may also be responsible for the cryptic trend of asymmetry in derived groups. Because lungfish and coelacanths share this trait, it is likely that tetrapods also inherited it. We believe that study of this morphological laterality will provide insights into the behavioral and sensory lateralization of vertebrates. © 2017 Zoological Society of Japan.


Nakajima J.,Kyushu University | Nakajima J.,Fukuoka Institute of Health Environmental | Sato T.,Kyushu University | Kano Y.,Kyushu University | And 4 more authors.
Ichthyological Exploration of Freshwaters | Year: 2013

We conducted fish sampling at 90 sites in the East Tiaoxi River, Yangtze River basin, China. Seventy-seven species belonging to 19 families were recorded, and photographs of live specimens are provided for all species. Three exotic species were recorded: Cirrhinus cirrhosus, C. molitorella, Gambusia affinis. The top 3 species-rich families were Cyprinidae (46 %), Cobitidae (5 %) and Gobiidae (5 %). The species composition in the East Tiaoxi River is similar to that of the Yangtze River Basin; however, the East Tiaoxi River has quite a diverse fish fauna for a small river system. © 2013 by Verlag Dr. Friedrich Pfeil, München, Germany.


Kitamura J.,Mie Prefectural Museum | Kitamura J.,Toho University | Nagata N.,Tohoku University | Nakajima J.,Fukuoka Institute of Health Environmental | Sota T.,Kyoto University
Journal of Evolutionary Biology | Year: 2012

Bitterling fishes deposit their eggs on the gills of living mussels using a long ovipositor. We examined whether ovipositor length (OL) and egg shape correlated with differences in host mussel species in the family Unionidae among populations of the tabira bitterling (Acheilognathus tabira) in Japan. Bitterling populations that use mussels in the sub-family Anodontinae possessed longer ovipositors and more elongated eggs than those using mussels of Unioninae, as expected from the difference in host size between the sub-families (anodontine mussels are larger than unionine mussels). Based on a robust phylogeny of A. tabira populations, we demonstrated that the evolution of both OL and egg shape were correlated with host differences, but not with each other, suggesting that these traits have been selected for independently. Our study demonstrates how adaptive traits for brood parasitism may diverge with host shift due to different host availability and/or interspecific competition for hosts. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2012 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.


Watanabe K.,Kyoto University | Mori S.,Gifu Keizai University | Tanaka T.,The Museum of Nature and Human Activities | Kanagawa N.,4 3 26 Honmachi | And 12 more authors.
Ichthyological Research | Year: 2014

The genetic population structure of the small cyprinid Hemigrammocypris rasborella, distributed widely in lowlands of western Japan, was examined using partial sequence data of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Molecular phylogenetic analysis revealed that the populations of the western Kyushu region were markedly differentiated from all eastern populations, such that the groups would be comparable to different species; their divergence was inferred to have occurred in the Late Miocene–Pliocene. Also, a largely divergent mtDNA group (with divergence in the early Pleistocene) was found in the Sanyo and northeastern Shikoku regions, forming a secondary contact zone in the western Kinki with the eastern mtDNA group. To date, these aspects of the population structure of H. rasborella appear to be unique among lowland fishes in western Japan. Deeper understanding of the formation processes of freshwater faunas in western Japan will require further comparisons of the phylogeographic patterns and ecological traits of constituent species. © 2014, The Ichthyological Society of Japan.


Nishioka Y.,Osaka University | Nakagawa R.,Mie Prefectural Museum | Nunami S.,Asakura Publishing Co. | Hirasawa S.,Toyama Science Museum
Zoological Studies | Year: 2016

Small mammalian remains were newly discovered from the Late Quaternary sediments of the Yaeyama region (Ishigaki and Yonaguni Islands) in the southwestern-most part of Japan. We examined these materials based on taxonomical and chronological approaches, in order to reconstruct the past fauna in this region. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry radiocarbon dating indicates that the mammalian assemblages from Ishigaki and Yonaguni Islands are composed mainly of late Holocene fossils. The fossil assemblage from Ishigaki Island comprises five species of small mammals belonging to Soricomorpha (Suncus murinus), Chiroptera (Pteropus sp., Hipposideros turpis, and Rhinolophus perditus), and Rodentia (Niviventer sp.). One rodent bone, collected from the fissure sediments near Sabichi-do Cave, Ishigaki Island, is dated at 230 ± 20 yBP (ca. AD 1,700), and is considered part of the recent remain. Furthermore, the fossil assemblage from Umabana-zaki Fissure, on Yonaguni Island, is dated at 1,760 ± 20 yBP (ca. AD 300) and comprises three species of small mammals belonging to Chiroptera (Pipistrellus cf. abramus) and Rodentia (Niviventer sp. and Mus musculus). Niviventer is not currently distributed in Japan. Only domestic rats (Rattus rattus and R. norvegicus) live on Ishigaki and Yonaguni Islands at the present time. However, the fossil assemblage from Umabana-zaki Fissure is dominated completely by Niviventer sp. Most fossils of small mammals found from the late Holocene Ishigaki and Yonaguni Islands represented species that are currently endemic to the Yaeyama region. Niviventer sp. from these islands is unique because this form has never been found from neighboring regions, such as Taiwan and Miyako Islands, and because it likely existed in the late Holocene. These discoveries support the hypothesis that the Yaeyama region had been isolated zoogeographically from the continent even during the Last Glacial Maximum, when the sea level had drastically fallen. © 2016, Academia Sinica. All rights reserved.


Takahashi N.,Tokyo University of Science | Kami C.,Tokyo University of Science | Ota I.,Tamagawa University | Morita N.,Mie Prefectural Museum | Imaichi R.,Tokyo University of Science
American Journal of Botany | Year: 2015

• Premise of the study: Understanding the origin and early evolution of vascular plants requires thorough consideration of the gametophyte generation of ferns and lycophytes. Unfortunately, information about this generation is quite limited. To reveal the origin and evolution of varied gametophyte shapes, we used comparative morphological studies of meristem behavior of gametophytes of Lygodium japonicum, which exhibit the typical cordate shape. • Methods: Microscopic images of epi-illuminated growing gametophytes cultured from spores were captured periodically using a metallurgical microscope equipped with a digital camera to analyze the cell lineage in the meristem. • Key results: Gametophytes form from two meristems: the apical-cell-based meristem and the multicellular meristem. The triangular apical cell produces six to eight derivatives from two lateral facets, then disappears. Subsequently, the multicellular meristem, with a row of several rectangular cells, forms in the notch. These rectangular cells divide asynchronously in the periclinal and anticlinal walls to produce cells to both lateral sides and downward. Usually two, and sometimes three, cells located at the center of the meristem divide at a slower pace in the periclinal and anticlinal planes than others at the periphery. The cells at the periphery are pushed away and become involved in the wing base. • Conclusions: The triangular apical cell behaves as a permanent initial cell. In the multicellular meristem, however, two or three central cells behave as initial cells that are transient and regulated in a position-dependent manner. The organization and behavior of both meristems are shared with the ribbon-shaped gametophytes of Colysis. © 2015 Botanical Society of America.


Ogura-Tsujita Y.,Saga University | Hirayama Y.,Tokyo University of Science | Sakoda A.,Tokyo University of Science | Suzuki A.,Tokyo University of Science | And 3 more authors.
Mycorrhiza | Year: 2016

To determine the mycorrhizal status of pteridophyte gametophytes in diverse taxa, the mycorrhizal colonization of wild gametophytes was investigated in terrestrial cordate gametophytes of pre-polypod leptosporangiate ferns, i.e., one species of Osmundaceae (Osmunda banksiifolia), two species of Gleicheniaceae (Diplopterygium glaucum, Dicranopteris linearis), and four species of Cyatheales including tree ferns (Plagiogyriaceae: Plagiogyria japonica, Plagiogyria euphlebia; Cyatheaceae: Cyathea podophylla, Cyathea lepifera). Microscopic observations revealed that 58 to 97 % of gametophytes in all species were colonized with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. Fungal colonization was limited to the multilayered midrib (cushion) tissue in all gametophytes examined. Molecular identification using fungal SSU rDNA sequences indicated that the AM fungi in gametophytes primarily belonged to the Glomeraceae, but also included the Claroideoglomeraceae, Gigasporaceae, Acaulosporaceae, and Archaeosporales. This study provides the first evidence for AM fungal colonization of wild gametophytes in the Plagiogyriaceae and Cyatheaceae. Taxonomically divergent photosynthetic gametophytes are similarly colonized by AM fungi, suggesting that mycorrhizal associations with AM fungi could widely occur in terrestrial pteridophyte gametophytes. © 2015, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


PubMed | National Museum of Nature and Science, Saga University, Japan Women's University and Mie Prefectural Museum
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Mycorrhiza | Year: 2016

To determine the mycorrhizal status of pteridophyte gametophytes in diverse taxa, the mycorrhizal colonization of wild gametophytes was investigated in terrestrial cordate gametophytes of pre-polypod leptosporangiate ferns, i.e., one species of Osmundaceae (Osmunda banksiifolia), two species of Gleicheniaceae (Diplopterygium glaucum, Dicranopteris linearis), and four species of Cyatheales including tree ferns (Plagiogyriaceae: Plagiogyria japonica, Plagiogyria euphlebia; Cyatheaceae: Cyathea podophylla, Cyathea lepifera). Microscopic observations revealed that 58 to 97% of gametophytes in all species were colonized with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. Fungal colonization was limited to the multilayered midrib (cushion) tissue in all gametophytes examined. Molecular identification using fungal SSU rDNA sequences indicated that the AM fungi in gametophytes primarily belonged to the Glomeraceae, but also included the Claroideoglomeraceae, Gigasporaceae, Acaulosporaceae, and Archaeosporales. This study provides the first evidence for AM fungal colonization of wild gametophytes in the Plagiogyriaceae and Cyatheaceae. Taxonomically divergent photosynthetic gametophytes are similarly colonized by AM fungi, suggesting that mycorrhizal associations with AM fungi could widely occur in terrestrial pteridophyte gametophytes.


PubMed | Tamagawa University, Japan Women's University and Mie Prefectural Museum
Type: Journal Article | Journal: American journal of botany | Year: 2015

Understanding the origin and early evolution of vascular plants requires thorough consideration of the gametophyte generation of ferns and lycophytes. Unfortunately, information about this generation is quite limited. To reveal the origin and evolution of varied gametophyte shapes, we used comparative morphological studies of meristem behavior of gametophytes of Lygodium japonicum, which exhibit the typical cordate shape.Microscopic images of epi-illuminated growing gametophytes cultured from spores were captured periodically using a metallurgical microscope equipped with a digital camera to analyze the cell lineage in the meristem.Gametophytes form from two meristems: the apical-cell-based meristem and the multicellular meristem. The triangular apical cell produces six to eight derivatives from two lateral facets, then disappears. Subsequently, the multicellular meristem, with a row of several rectangular cells, forms in the notch. These rectangular cells divide asynchronously in the periclinal and anticlinal walls to produce cells to both lateral sides and downward. Usually two, and sometimes three, cells located at the center of the meristem divide at a slower pace in the periclinal and anticlinal planes than others at the periphery. The cells at the periphery are pushed away and become involved in the wing base.The triangular apical cell behaves as a permanent initial cell. In the multicellular meristem, however, two or three central cells behave as initial cells that are transient and regulated in a position-dependent manner. The organization and behavior of both meristems are shared with the ribbon-shaped gametophytes of Colysis.

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