Downers Grove, IL, United States
Downers Grove, IL, United States

Midwestern University is an American non-profit graduate and professional school specializing in health science education. Founded in 1900 as the American College of Osteopathic Medicine and Surgery, it is the fourth-oldest medical school currently active in the state of Illinois. In 1995, it increased its presence by opening another campus in Glendale, Arizona, becoming the second medical school to teach students in the state of Arizona. It has since expanded beyond solely providing medical education and now operates ten colleges, offering degrees in dentistry, pharmacy, optometry, podiatric medicine, and other health professions.The university is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission, a Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. The medical schools are also accredited by the American Osteopathic Association's Commission on Osteopathic College Accreditation. Wikipedia.


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Jack J. Hawks, DO, Family Medicine Physician at Honor Health Medical Group, and affiliated with John C. Lincoln Medical Center and Deer Valley Medical Center, has been named a 2017 Top Doctor in Phoenix, Arizona. Top Doctor Awards is dedicated to selecting and honoring those healthcare practitioners who have demonstrated clinical excellence while delivering the highest standards of patient care. Dr. Jack J. Hawks has been in practice for more than 14 years, and has already become known as one of the top family medicine physicians in the Phoenix area. His medical career began in 2002, when he graduated from Midwestern University’s Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine in Glendale. He then completed an internship and residency at St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, before entering private practice. Board certified by the American Board of Family Medicine, Dr. Hawks treats patients of all ages for a wide variety of conditions. Conditions treated by him include arthritis, osteoporosis, hypertension, menopausal disorders, diabetes, and anxiety and depression. Expert procedures undertaken by Dr. Hawks include skin biopsy, abscess drainage, mole removal, and the administering of vaccination and immunization shots. Dr. Hawks remains a distinguished member of the American Osteopathic Association, and is renowned for his compassionate and patient centric approach to medicine. He is always happy to talk to his patients about their concerns and conditions, and to discuss potential treatments. This laudable attitude makes Dr. Jack J. Hawks a very worthy winner of a 2017 Top Doctor Award. Top Doctor Awards specializes in recognizing and commemorating the achievements of today’s most influential and respected doctors in medicine. Our selection process considers education, research contributions, patient reviews, and other quality measures to identify top doctors.


PHOENIX, April 23, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- When pet owners need expert veterinary care, they turn to Dr. Hillary Frank, who not only runs her veterinary hospital, but also puts the needs of animals first at the Animal Humane Society of Phoenix. Dr. Hillary Frank of North Central Animal Hospital is a passionate advocate for pet health and educates pet owners on what they need to do to provide pets the care that they deserve. A primary goal of the Animal Humane Society of Phoenix (AHSPHX) is to educate pet owners and help them support the needs of a pet of any age. The mission of the Animal Humane Society of Phoenix is to promote the humane care of all pets and the health of the humans around them by providing education based on science and research. They regularly offer educational lectures on humane pet care and related human health concerns. Groups can contact them directly to schedule a talk on a particular concern. Education about routine care, home care, and medical care for animals helps them live longer and healthier lives. Improper care is the leading cause of illness and premature death in many exotics. More commonly seen animals need special care and attention too. There are a number of misconceptions concerning proper pet care for dogs and cats. Preventative care starting at the minimum with an annual checkup can help keep pets healthy. Dr. Hillary Frank opened North Central Animal Hospital in Phoenix in 1995. She treats a wide variety of companion animals, such as dogs, cats, birds, ferrets, rabbits, reptiles, and exotics. In addition to being a general practitioner, in 2004, she became the first avian specialist in Arizona and recertifies for her competency every ten years. Active in the community and numerous veterinary and civic organizations, she is also an adjunct professor at the Midwestern University, College of Veterinary Medicine. “Pet owners need to understand the diverse needs of beloved pets, including dogs, cats, and exotics,” said Dr. Hillary Frank. “We are here to help pet owners dispel myths and provide their pets with the very best of care. In the long run, this makes for healthier pets and allows pet owners to enjoy pet companionship for many years to come. Feel free to reach out to me at North Central Animal Hospital or at the Animal Humane Society of Phoenix with your pet care concerns.” Dr. Hillary Frank of North Central Animal Hospital has served Phoenix area pets and owners since 1995. Their AAHA® accredited animal hospital offers high-quality veterinary care for dogs, cats, birds, small mammals, reptiles, and other exotics. From routine to advanced optimal care in all stages of life. Call (602) 900-9586 to learn about the Animal Humane Society of Phoenix or visit http://ahsphx.org/.


PHOENIX, April 23, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- When pet owners need expert veterinary care, they turn to Dr. Hillary Frank, who not only runs her veterinary hospital, but also puts the needs of animals first at the Animal Humane Society of Phoenix. Dr. Hillary Frank of North Central Animal Hospital is a passionate advocate for pet health and educates pet owners on what they need to do to provide pets the care that they deserve. A primary goal of the Animal Humane Society of Phoenix (AHSPHX) is to educate pet owners and help them support the needs of a pet of any age. The mission of the Animal Humane Society of Phoenix is to promote the humane care of all pets and the health of the humans around them by providing education based on science and research. They regularly offer educational lectures on humane pet care and related human health concerns. Groups can contact them directly to schedule a talk on a particular concern. Education about routine care, home care, and medical care for animals helps them live longer and healthier lives. Improper care is the leading cause of illness and premature death in many exotics. More commonly seen animals need special care and attention too. There are a number of misconceptions concerning proper pet care for dogs and cats. Preventative care starting at the minimum with an annual checkup can help keep pets healthy. Dr. Hillary Frank opened North Central Animal Hospital in Phoenix in 1995. She treats a wide variety of companion animals, such as dogs, cats, birds, ferrets, rabbits, reptiles, and exotics. In addition to being a general practitioner, in 2004, she became the first avian specialist in Arizona and recertifies for her competency every ten years. Active in the community and numerous veterinary and civic organizations, she is also an adjunct professor at the Midwestern University, College of Veterinary Medicine. “Pet owners need to understand the diverse needs of beloved pets, including dogs, cats, and exotics,” said Dr. Hillary Frank. “We are here to help pet owners dispel myths and provide their pets with the very best of care. In the long run, this makes for healthier pets and allows pet owners to enjoy pet companionship for many years to come. Feel free to reach out to me at North Central Animal Hospital or at the Animal Humane Society of Phoenix with your pet care concerns.” Dr. Hillary Frank of North Central Animal Hospital has served Phoenix area pets and owners since 1995. Their AAHA® accredited animal hospital offers high-quality veterinary care for dogs, cats, birds, small mammals, reptiles, and other exotics. From routine to advanced optimal care in all stages of life. Call (602) 900-9586 to learn about the Animal Humane Society of Phoenix or visit http://ahsphx.org/.


PHOENIX, April 23, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- When pet owners need expert veterinary care, they turn to Dr. Hillary Frank, who not only runs her veterinary hospital, but also puts the needs of animals first at the Animal Humane Society of Phoenix. Dr. Hillary Frank of North Central Animal Hospital is a passionate advocate for pet health and educates pet owners on what they need to do to provide pets the care that they deserve. A primary goal of the Animal Humane Society of Phoenix (AHSPHX) is to educate pet owners and help them support the needs of a pet of any age. The mission of the Animal Humane Society of Phoenix is to promote the humane care of all pets and the health of the humans around them by providing education based on science and research. They regularly offer educational lectures on humane pet care and related human health concerns. Groups can contact them directly to schedule a talk on a particular concern. Education about routine care, home care, and medical care for animals helps them live longer and healthier lives. Improper care is the leading cause of illness and premature death in many exotics. More commonly seen animals need special care and attention too. There are a number of misconceptions concerning proper pet care for dogs and cats. Preventative care starting at the minimum with an annual checkup can help keep pets healthy. Dr. Hillary Frank opened North Central Animal Hospital in Phoenix in 1995. She treats a wide variety of companion animals, such as dogs, cats, birds, ferrets, rabbits, reptiles, and exotics. In addition to being a general practitioner, in 2004, she became the first avian specialist in Arizona and recertifies for her competency every ten years. Active in the community and numerous veterinary and civic organizations, she is also an adjunct professor at the Midwestern University, College of Veterinary Medicine. “Pet owners need to understand the diverse needs of beloved pets, including dogs, cats, and exotics,” said Dr. Hillary Frank. “We are here to help pet owners dispel myths and provide their pets with the very best of care. In the long run, this makes for healthier pets and allows pet owners to enjoy pet companionship for many years to come. Feel free to reach out to me at North Central Animal Hospital or at the Animal Humane Society of Phoenix with your pet care concerns.” Dr. Hillary Frank of North Central Animal Hospital has served Phoenix area pets and owners since 1995. Their AAHA® accredited animal hospital offers high-quality veterinary care for dogs, cats, birds, small mammals, reptiles, and other exotics. From routine to advanced optimal care in all stages of life. Call (602) 900-9586 to learn about the Animal Humane Society of Phoenix or visit http://ahsphx.org/.


Kamilar J.M.,Midwestern University
Philosophical transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological sciences | Year: 2013

Examining biological diversity in an explicitly evolutionary context has been the subject of research for several decades, yet relatively recent advances in analytical techniques and the increasing availability of species-level phylogenies, have enabled scientists to ask new questions. One such approach is to quantify phylogenetic signal to determine how trait variation is correlated with the phylogenetic relatedness of species. When phylogenetic signal is high, closely related species exhibit similar traits, and this biological similarity decreases as the evolutionary distance between species increases. Here, we first review the concept of phylogenetic signal and suggest how to measure and interpret phylogenetic signal in species traits. Second, we quantified phylogenetic signal in primates for 31 variables, including body mass, brain size, life-history, sexual selection, social organization, diet, activity budget, ranging patterns and climatic variables. We found that phylogenetic signal varies extensively across and even within trait categories. The highest values are exhibited by brain size and body mass, moderate values are found in the degree of territoriality and canine size dimorphism, while low values are displayed by most of the remaining variables. Our results have important implications for the evolution of behaviour and ecology in primates and other vertebrates.


Weissig V.,Midwestern University
Pharmaceutical Research | Year: 2011

This review illustrates how a random observation at the laboratory bench has helped pave the way towards the development of organelle-targeted pharmaceutical nanocarriers. A fortuitous discovery in the mid 1990s involving the self-assembly of a molecule, known to accumulate inside mitochondria, has lead to the development of subcellular nanocarriers suited for the selective delivery of biologically active molecules to mitochondria inside living mammalian cells. Applications for mitochondria-specific drug and DNA delivery are described, the current state-of-the-art of mitochondrial drug targeting technology is reviewed, and its future perspectives are discussed. © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011.


The present invention relates to compositions and methods for treating neuropsychiatric disorders in vertebrates and humans. More specifically, the present invention provides for use of IRL-1620, an endothelin-B receptor agonist, in appropriate doses to be a neuroprotective and a neuroregenerative agent. Accordingly, in one aspect the disclosure provides a method of treating a neuropsychiatric disorder comprising administering to a patient in need thereof a therapeutically effective amount of an endothelin-B receptor agonist to treat the neuropsychiatric disorder. In some embodiments, the endothelin-B receptor agonist is co-administered with an additional agent to treat the neuropsychiatric disorder. In some embodiments, the additional agent is selected from the group consisting of an antidepressant, an anti-inflammatory agent, a CNS stimulant, a neuroleptic, and an anti-proliferative agent.


Patent
Technology Transfer Program and Midwestern University | Date: 2014-07-17

Generally provided herein are methods, compounds, and compositions described useful for the treatment of light chain amyloidosis and other amyloid protein diseases.


Methods of using an ET_(B )receptor agonist, such as IRL-1620, for the treatment of stroke or cerebrovascular accidents are disclosed. The ET_(B )receptor agonist is used alone or in combination with a second agent useful in the treatment of stroke or other cerebrovascular accident.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: Biological Anthropology | Award Amount: 57.34K | Year: 2014

This project examines how core physiological and evolutionary processes shape biological diversity. Elucidating how genetic changes and selection pressures result in trait variation is a central goal of biology, and key to this is identifying the links between genes, form and function, and how these can alter the fitness of individuals and the evolutionary success of species. Moreover, understanding why and how many cellular and body structures have evolved independently in different species can explain how evolution takes multiple routes to solve the same problem.

The biology of hair is an ideal system for studying these links between genetics, form and function. Hair is an anatomical trait that is shaped by both natural selection (e.g., providing camouflage against predators, protection from parasites, maintaining body temperature in cold environments) and sexual selection (e.g., signaling sex, age, status). It is a universal characteristic of mammals, yet across species there is striking variation in the color, pattern, growth, and texture of hair. Moreover, many hair traits, such as tail stripes or thick woolly coats, seem to have evolved repeatedly in different mammal lineages. Hair also is a trait for which small genetic differences can have major phenotypic effects; for example, red hair in humans is due to variation at a single gene.

This project applies cutting-edge genomic and comparative analyses to understand how genetic variation and selection have shaped this important anatomical feature (hair) in humans and other primates. In so doing, it also will provide a critical evolutionary context to understand one of the biological traits that make humans unique (relative hairlessness). Through conduct of the research, several undergraduate and graduate students, including individuals recruited from groups underrepresented in science, as well as a postdoctoral scholar, will receive extensive and broad scientific training. In addition, because many human and animal diseases are associated with hair changes and loss, this project is relevant for aspects of public health and dermatological and clinical research on hair/skin conditions. Animal hair also is an important commercial product; identifying the biological factors that shape hair characteristics in natural-living species could eventually improve the yield and quality of hair-based products. And finally, the project will generate a wealth of genetic and metric data on primate diversity that will contribute to research in conservation and evolutionary biology, as well as furthering research in biological anthropology.

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