Midwest State University of Parana

Guarapuava, Brazil

Midwest State University of Parana

Guarapuava, Brazil
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da Silva L.A.,Federal University of Paraná | da Silva L.A.,Post University | Wouk J.,Midwest State University of Parana | Weber V.M.R.,Midwest State University of Parana | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Applied Pharmaceutical Science | Year: 2017

Diabetes mellitus (DM) has an important relation with thyroid hormones (TH) dysfunctions, and if analyzed accurately, may contribute to the diagnosis of clinical conditions such as hyperglycemia and insulin resistance (IR). Relevant studies are being made about the role of TH in mediating metabolic actions related to DM, acting in many glands and energetic subtracts regulator tissues. Some issues, such as the action of TH over the ionic regulation in the cells, altering actions in different paths; its role over the negative feedback by downregulations upon insulin action, but provoking an increase in β pancreatic cells proliferations, point out important directions to research. The mechanisms of action related to thyroid hormones and the insulinotropic action form a counterbalance, and if an imbalance occur (hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism) it may be noted the presence of DM or IR. The interactions between TH, DM and caffeine are unknown aspects in the literature, which need a better attention and the development of experimental clinic studies to elucidate their mechanisms and clinical applications. © 2017 Luiz Augusto da Silva et al.


Ferreira G.A.,Federal University of Pernambuco | Bertuzzi R.,University of Sao Paulo | Lima-Silva A.E.,Federal University of Pernambuco | Malfatti C.,Midwest State University of Parana | And 2 more authors.
Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism | Year: 2016

We investigated if the rate of perceived exertion (RPE) threshold is as sensitive as the lactate threshold to detect training differences. Lactate and RPE thresholds were identified in well-trained cyclists and physically active males. Power output was higher in well-trained cyclists than in physically active individuals for both thresholds (p < 0.05). Our results suggest that RPE threshold is successful in discriminating differences between well-trained cyclists and physically active individuals. © 2016, National Research Council of Canada. All rights reserved.


PubMed | Federal University of Paraná, Midwest State University of Parana, University of Sao Paulo, Federal University of Pernambuco and Federal University of Lavras
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Applied physiology, nutrition, and metabolism = Physiologie appliquee, nutrition et metabolisme | Year: 2016

We investigated if the rate of perceived exertion (RPE) threshold is as sensitive as the lactate threshold to detect training differences. Lactate and RPE thresholds were identified in well-trained cyclists and physically active males. Power output was higher in well-trained cyclists than in physically active individuals for both thresholds (p < 0.05). Our results suggest that RPE threshold is successful in discriminating differences between well-trained cyclists and physically active individuals.


Schuster M.Z.,Federal University of Paraná | Pelissari A.,Federal University of Paraná | de Moraes A.,Federal University of Paraná | Harrison S.K.,Ohio State University | And 4 more authors.
Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment | Year: 2016

Integrated crop-livestock systems (ICLS) are widespread worldwide. Although weeds can result in several types of losses, essential information regarding weed seedling emergence and seed banks is lacking in these systems for integrated weed management planning. This study investigated the effects of different grazing intensities (no grazing and grazed swards maintained at 10-, 20-, 30- and 40-cm sward heights) on weed seedling emergence and seed banks in a winter cover crop during the 15th year of an ICLS experiment under no-tillage management in subtropical Southern Brazil. We hypothesized that low grazing intensities would reduce weed interference and weed seed banks size in an ICLS. We determined treatment effects on weed species richness, seed bank population density, and seedling emergence during winter and summer. Higher sward heights in the winter-grazed cover crop reduced the number of weed species, the density of emerged weed seedlings, and the weed seed bank size compared with the non-grazed control. With a sward grazing height of 10 cm, the seed bank contained an average of 3151 seeds m−2, and the weed population densities during the summer and winter were 11.8 and 21.7 plants m−2 greater, respectively, compared with the sward grazing height of 40 cm. Fifteen years after adopting low grazing intensities (30- and 40-cm sward heights) in the ICLS, the size of the weed seed bank was reduced by 42.1% compared with the non-grazed treatment. Decreasing the grazing intensity reduced the number of weed species, the density of emerged weed seedlings, and the weed seed bank density; therefore, integrated weed management strategies should consider minimizing grazing intensities in an ICLS. © 2016 Elsevier B.V.


Alberton C.L.,Federal University of Pelotas | Finatto P.,Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul | Pinto S.S.,Federal University of Pelotas | Antunes A.H.,Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Sports Sciences | Year: 2015

Abstract: The purpose was to analyse the vertical ground reaction forces (Fz) of head-out aquatic exercises [stationary running (SR), frontal kick (FK), cross-country skiing (CCS), jumping jacks (JJ), adductor hop (ADH) and abductor hop (ABH)] at two cadences in both aquatic and dry land environments. Twelve young women completed two sessions in each environment, each consisting of three exercises performed at two cadences (first and second ventilatory thresholds – C1 and C2, respectively). Two-way and three-way repeated measures analysis of variance were used to the statistical analysis. The results showed that the peak Fz and impulse were significantly lower in the aquatic environment, resulting in values from 28.2% to 58.5% and 60.4% to 72.8% from those obtained on dry land, respectively. In the aquatic environment, the peak Fz was lower and the impulse was higher at the C1 than at the C2. Furthermore, it was observed that SR and FK (0.9–1.1 BW) elicited a significantly higher peak Fz values compared to the ADH and JJ exercises (0.5–0.8 BW). It can be concluded that the aquatic environment reduces the Fz during head-out aquatic exercises. It should be noted that its magnitude is also dependent on the intensity and the identity of the exercise performed. © 2014, © 2014 Taylor & Francis.


Alberton C.L.,Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul | Tartaruga M.P.,Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul | Tartaruga M.P.,Midwest State University of Parana | Pinto S.S.,Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul | And 4 more authors.
International Journal of Sports Medicine | Year: 2013

The aim of the present study was to compare the peak vertical ground reaction force (V-GRFpeak) and impulse of women performing water aerobic exercises at different intensities in aquatic and dry land environments. 15 young women performed 1 session in each environment consisting of 3 water aerobic exercises (stationary running, frontal kick and cross country skiing) performed at 3 cadences (first ventilatory threshold, second ventilatory threshold and maximum effort, as determined during exercise in water) in a randomized order. 2-way and 3-way repeated measures ANOVA were used to analyze the impulse and V-GRFpeak, respectively. Significantly lower values of V-GRFpeak and impulse (p<0.001) were observed for the aquatic environment. Significant differences were observed among all cadences for V-GRFpeak and impulse (p<0.001) in both environments except for the V-GRFpeak between the cadences corresponding to the second ventilatory threshold and maximum effort in the aquatic environment. In addition, significantly lower V-GRFpeak values in the aquatic environment were found for cross country skiing compared to the other exercises (p<0.001). Thus, water exercises are safe for people that need to minimize vertical ground reaction force; however, an important issue to be considered during water aerobics training is the exercise and intensity to be prescribed. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart. New York.


PubMed | Federal University of Pelotas, Midwest State University of Parana and Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul
Type: Journal Article | Journal: International journal of sports medicine | Year: 2014

This study aimed to compare the oxygen uptake (VO2), the muscle activity of lower limbs, and the vertical ground reaction force (V-GRF) of women performing water aerobic exercises at different intensities. 12 young women performed the experimental protocol, which consisted of 3 water exercises (stationary running [SR], frontal kick [FK] and cross country skiing [CCS]) at 3 intensities (first and second ventilatory thresholds and maximum effort). A two-way repeated measures ANOVA was used. Regarding VO2, different responses between intensities (p<0.001) were found, and values between exercises were similar. For electromyographic activity (EMG), differences between intensities for all muscles (p<0.001) were found. Greater EMG signals were observed in the FK compared to SR for rectus femoris, semitendinosus, vastus lateralis and biceps femoris muscles (p<0.05). Regarding V-GRF, there was an increase in the V-GRF at greater intensities compared to the first ventilatory threshold (p=0.001). In addition, lower values were found during CCS compared to the SR and FK exercises (p<0.001). Thus, greater cardiorespiratory and neuromuscular responses were observed with increasing intensity. Exercises such as CCS could be used to attenuate the V-GRF; if the purpose is to reduce the muscular activity of lower limbs at a specific intensity, SR could be recommended.


PubMed | Federal University of Pelotas, Midwest State University of Parana and Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul
Type: | Journal: Journal of human kinetics | Year: 2016

The purpose of the present study was to analyze the electromyographic (EMG) signals of the rectus femoris (RF), vastus lateralis (VL), semitendinosus (ST) and short head of the biceps femoris (BF) during the performance of stationary running at different intensities in aquatic and dry land environments. The sample consisted of 12 female volunteers who performed the stationary running exercise in aquatic and dry land environments at a submaximal cadence (80 beatsmin(-1) controlled by a metronome) and at maximal velocity, with EMG signal measurements from the RF, VL, ST and BF muscles. The results showed a distinct pattern between environments for each muscle examined. For the submaximal cadence of 80 beatsmin(-1), there was a reduced magnitude of the EMG signal in the aquatic environment, except for the ST muscle, the pattern of which was similar in both environments. In contrast to the submaximal cadence, the pattern of the EMG signal from all of the muscles showed similar magnitudes for both environments and phases of movement at maximal velocity, except for the VL muscle. Therefore, the EMG signals from the RF, VL, ST and BF muscles of women during stationary running had different patterns of activation over the range of motion between aquatic and dry land environments for different intensities. Moreover, the neuromuscular responses of the lower limbs were optimized by an increase in intensity from submaximal cadence to maximal velocity.


PubMed | Federal Technological University of Paraná, Midwest State University of Parana and State University of Ponta Grossa
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Pharmaceutical biology | Year: 2016

Obesity is the main risk factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus. Secondary metabolites with biological activities and pharmacological potential have been identified in species of the Baccharis genus that are specifically distributed in the Americas.This study evaluated the effects of methanol extracts from Baccharis dracunculifolia DC. Asteraceae on metabolic parameters, satiety, and growth in monosodium glutamate (MSG) induced-obesity model rats.MSG was administered to 32 newborn rats (4mg/g of body weight) once daily for 5 consecutive days. Four experimental groups (control, control + extract, MSG, and MSG + extract) were treated for 30 consecutive days with 400mg/kg of B. dracunculifolia extract by gavage. Biochemical parameters, antioxidant activity, total extract phenolic content (methanolic, ethanolic, and acetone extractions), and pancreatic islets were evaluated.High levels of phenolic compounds were identified in B. dracunculifolia extracts (methanol: 46.20.4mg GAE/L; acetate: 70.50.5mg GAE/L; and ethanol: 30.30.21mg GAE/L); high antioxidant activity was detected in B. dracunculifolia ethanol and methanol extracts. The concentration of serum insulin increased 30% in obese animals treated with extract solutions (1.4-2.0U/mL, p<0.05). Insulin secretion in pancreatic islets was 8.3mM glucose (58%, p<0.05) and 16.7mM (99.5%, p<0.05) in rats in the MSG+extract and MSG groups, respectively.Treatment with B. dracunculifolia extracts protected pancreatic islets and prevented the irreversible cellular damage observed in animals in obesity and diabetes models.


Brisswalter J.,University of Nice Sophia Antipolis | Tartaruga M.P.,Midwest State University of Parana
Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation | Year: 2014

This study compared the reliability of the Cosmed FitMate™ and K4b2 metabolic systems during light to heavy steady state exercise. Expired gas, ventilation were recorded in 50 subjects, using in a random order among four sessions, either the FitMate™ or the Cosmed K4b2. No differences in oxygen consumption were observed between the two systems whatever the intensity. Intraclass correlation were high for both analyzers (respectively for the FitMate™ system and the Cosmed K4b2; ICC: 0.76-0.88 vs. 0.88-0.95). The FitMate™ metabolic system could be a useful reliable and easy-to-use metabolic system in energy expenditure measurement. © 2014 Informa Healthcare.

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