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Albuquerque, NM, United States

Kinzli K.-D.,Florida Gulf Coast University | Gensler D.,Middle Rio Grande Conservancy District | DeJonge K.,U.S. Department of Agriculture | Oad R.,Colorado State University | Shafike N.,New Mexico Interstate Stream Commission
Journal of Irrigation and Drainage Engineering | Year: 2015

To address water shortage and improve water delivery operations, decision support systems (DSSs) have been developed and utilized throughout the United States and the world. One critical aspect that is often neglected during the development and implementation of DSSs is validation, which can result in flawed water distribution and rejection of the DSS by water users and managers. This paper presents the results of a significant validation effort for a DSS in the Middle Rio Grande Conservancy District (MRGCD). The validation resulted in a refined application efficiency of 45%, a refined readily available water for farmers to irrigate to a value of 20%, and a Nash-Sutcliffe modeling efficiency of 0.86 for soil moisture depletion patterns. Overall, the validation and refinement of input parameters resulted in a DSS model that accurately predicts evaportranspiration and can be used to schedule water delivery. The refinement of the DSS input parameters resulted in an increased 15,600 acre-ft diversion suggested by the DSS, indicating that the original DSS input parameters would have adversely affected farmers in the MRGCD. The paper showed that validation of a DSS is crucial if such a program is to be successfully utilized to deliver irrigation water. © 2014 American Society of Civil Engineers. Source


Kinzli K.-D.,Florida Gulf Coast University | Gensler D.,Middle Rio Grande Conservancy District | Oad R.,Colorado State University | Shafike N.,New Mexico Interstate Stream Commission
Journal of Irrigation and Drainage Engineering | Year: 2015

Decision support systems (DSSs) for irrigation system management have many benefits, which include water savings and the development of optimal water delivery schedules, while maintaining farmer productivity. To address water shortage and improve water delivery, DSSs have been developed and utilized throughout the United States and the world and can be used to predict crop depletions using weather data to schedule water delivery on the basis of crop demand. The overall utility of DSSs is that they allow managers to continue water delivery and equitably distribute supplies during a water shortage. For a decision support system to be successfully utilized, the complicated challenge of implementation needs to be addressed. Decision support system implementation is often met with harsh resistance from water users and managers alike, and, in many cases, a scientifically sound model is often rejected because of misinformation and lack of user education. This paper presents the successful implementation of a DSS and scheduled water delivery in the Middle Rio Grande Conservancy District (MRGCD). The implementation of the DSS was accomplished using a multifaceted approach that included gaining political support of the MRGCD Governing Board, training water masters and ditch riders in the use of the DSS, providing on-the-ground support and assistance, refining parameters in the DSS to address complexities, and gaining public acceptance for scheduled water delivery utilizing a DSS. A total of two key components for the implementation of the DSS and scheduled water delivery were linking it to the MRGCD supervisory control and data acquisition system (SCADA) and conducting a large public outreach and education campaign. The overall results of the DSS implementation were successful, and managers were able to deliver water to irrigators in a more efficient manner than traditional practice. © 2015 American Society of Civil Engineers. Source


Gensler D.,Middle Rio Grande Conservancy District | Kinzli K.-D.,Florida Gulf Coast University
Journal of Irrigation and Drainage Engineering | Year: 2013

Irrigation districts in the AmericanWest and throughout the world have extensive canal networks that could be utilized to generate a significant amount of hydropower. As the world attempts to become less dependent on carbon-based energy resources, small-scale hydropower (SSH) is an attractive potential resource for new energy development. The Middle Rio Grande Conservancy District (MRGCD) in central New Mexico has an extensive canal network, and hydropower is being considered as a viable form of renewable energy. Currently, the MRGCD has identified and categorized nine potential hydropower sites within its system with the goal of maximizing its contribution to the region's energy needs. This paper addresses key issues related to hydropower in irrigation districts and examines the feasibility of incorporating hydropower generation in the MRGCD canal system. With full year-round implementation of SSH generation at the nine locations investigated, the MRGCD could have a generating capacity of 2.2 MWand produce over 10 million kW . h during the year. This represents an income from power generation for the MRGCD of $1.032 million at the current power prices. More importantly, implementation of SSH would result in 1,340 homes being powered by clean, renewable energy while concurrently delivering water to irrigators. It is the hope of the authors that the case study presented will aid irrigation districts investigating the incorporation of hydropower in their canal networks. © 2013 American Society of Civil Engineers. Source


Kinzli K.-D.,Colorado State University | Martinez M.,Middle Rio Grande Conservancy District | Oad R.,Colorado State University | Prior A.,Clearwater Solutions | Gensler D.,Middle Rio Grande Conservancy District
Agricultural Water Management | Year: 2010

Seepage from earthen irrigation canals represents substantial water loss in irrigation districts. Historically, the determination of canal seepage was accomplished using the inflow-outflow method with propeller and electromagnetic type flow meters. This method was difficult, time consuming, and limited by measurement device accuracy. In recent years, advances in technology have lead to the widespread use of Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCP) for discharge measurements in streams and rivers. Even though ADCP use has become widespread for stream discharges, studies to determine canal seepage using this new technology are limited. Using an ADCP, extensive field measurements were conducted in the Middle Rio Grande Conservancy District. This paper describes the ADCP measurement protocol used to measure irrigation canal seepage and presents predictive equations for determining canal seepage based on flow rate and canal geometry. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Source

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