Microorganism Research Center

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Microorganism Research Center

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

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Tomaz F.M.M.B.,Microorganism Research Center | da Cruz Furini A.A.,Microorganism Research Center | Capobianco M.P.,Microorganism Research Center | Capobianco M.P.,Paulista University | And 13 more authors.
Cytokine | Year: 2015

Background: Several studies have recently demonstrated that the immune responses against malaria is governed by different factors, including the genetic components of the host. The IL-4 gene appears to be a strong candidate factor because of its role in the regulation of the Th2 response. The present study investigated the role of IL-4 polymorphisms in the development of IgG antibodies against PvAMA-1 and the IL-4 levels in individuals infected with Plasmodium vivax in a malaria endemic area in the Brazilian Amazon. Methods: The study sample included 83 patients who were diagnosed with P. vivax infection using thick smear and confirmed by nested-PCR. The IL-4 -. 590C>. T and IL-4 -. 33C>. T polymorphisms were genotyped by PCR-RFLP, and the intron 3 VNTR was genotyped by PCR. A standardised ELISA protocol was used to measure the total IgG against PvAMA-1. The cytokine/chemokine levels were measured using a Milliplex multiplex assay (Millipore). All of the subjects were genotyped with 48 ancestry informative markers to determine the proportions of African, European and Amerindian ancestry using STRUCTURE software. Results: Of the 83 patients, 60 (73%) produced IgG antibodies against PvAMA-1. A significant decrease in the percentage of respondents was observed among the primo-infected individuals. No significant differences were observed in the frequencies of genotypes and haplotypes among individuals who were positive or negative for IgG antibodies against PvAMA-1. Furthermore, no significant correlation was observed between the IL-4 polymorphisms, antibody levels, IL-4 levels, and parasitemia. Conclusions: This study indicated that the polymorphisms identified in the IL-4 gene are not likely to play a role in the regulation of the antibody response against PvAMA-1 and IL-4 production in vivax malaria. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.


PubMed | Paulista University, Microorganism Research Center, Federal University of Pará and Evandro Chagas Institute
Type: Clinical Trial | Journal: Cytokine | Year: 2015

Several studies have recently demonstrated that the immune responses against malaria is governed by different factors, including the genetic components of the host. The IL-4 gene appears to be a strong candidate factor because of its role in the regulation of the Th2 response. The present study investigated the role of IL-4 polymorphisms in the development of IgG antibodies against PvAMA-1 and the IL-4 levels in individuals infected with Plasmodium vivax in a malaria endemic area in the Brazilian Amazon.The study sample included 83 patients who were diagnosed with P. vivax infection using thick smear and confirmed by nested-PCR. The IL-4 -590C>T and IL-4 -33C>T polymorphisms were genotyped by PCR-RFLP, and the intron 3 VNTR was genotyped by PCR. A standardised ELISA protocol was used to measure the total IgG against PvAMA-1. The cytokine/chemokine levels were measured using a Milliplex multiplex assay (Millipore). All of the subjects were genotyped with 48 ancestry informative markers to determine the proportions of African, European and Amerindian ancestry using STRUCTURE software.Of the 83 patients, 60 (73%) produced IgG antibodies against PvAMA-1. A significant decrease in the percentage of respondents was observed among the primo-infected individuals. No significant differences were observed in the frequencies of genotypes and haplotypes among individuals who were positive or negative for IgG antibodies against PvAMA-1. Furthermore, no significant correlation was observed between the IL-4 polymorphisms, antibody levels, IL-4 levels, and parasitemia.This study indicated that the polymorphisms identified in the IL-4 gene are not likely to play a role in the regulation of the antibody response against PvAMA-1 and IL-4 production in vivax malaria.

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