MicroMRI Inc.

Langhorne, PA, United States

MicroMRI Inc.

Langhorne, PA, United States
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Villareal D.T.,University of Washington | Villareal D.T.,University of New Mexico | Kotyk J.J.,University of Washington | Armamento-Villareal R.C.,University of Washington | And 8 more authors.
Aging Cell | Year: 2011

Calorie restriction (CR) reduces bone quantity but not bone quality in rodents. Nothing is known regarding the long-term effects of CR with adequate intake of vitamin and minerals on bone quantity and quality in middle-aged lean individuals. In this study, we evaluated body composition, bone mineral density (BMD), and serum markers of bone turnover and inflammation in 32 volunteers who had been eating a CR diet (~35% less calories than controls) for an average of 6.8 ± 5.2 years (mean age 52.7 ± 10.3 years) and 32 age- and sex-matched sedentary controls eating Western diets (WD). In a subgroup of 10 CR and 10 WD volunteers, we also measured trabecular bone (TB) microarchitecture of the distal radius using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging. We found that the CR volunteers had significantly lower body mass index than the WD volunteers (18.9 ± 1.2 vs. 26.5 ± 2.2 kg m-2; P = 0.0001). BMD of the lumbar spine (0.870 ± 0.11 vs. 1.138 ± 0.12 g cm-2, P = 0.0001) and hip (0.806 ± 0.12 vs. 1.047 ± 0.12 g cm-2, P = 0.0001) was also lower in the CR than in the WD group. Serum C-terminal telopeptide and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase concentration were similar between groups, while serum C-reactive protein (0.19 ± 0.26 vs. 1.46 ± 1.56 mg L-1, P = 0.0001) was lower in the CR group. Trabecular bone microarchitecture parameters such as the erosion index (0.916 ± 0.087 vs. 0.877 ± 0.088; P = 0.739) and surface-to-curve ratio (10.3 ± 1.4 vs. 12.1 ± 2.1, P = 0.440) were not significantly different between groups. These findings suggest that markedly reduced BMD is not associated with significantly reduced bone quality in middle-aged men and women practicing long-term calorie restriction with adequate nutrition. © 2010 The Authors. Aging Cell © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/Anatomical Society of Great Britain and Ireland.


Greenspan S.L.,University of Pittsburgh | Perera S.,University of Pittsburgh | Recker R.,Creighton University | Wagner J.M.,University of Pittsburgh | And 4 more authors.
Bone | Year: 2010

Purpose: In addition to bone mineral density (BMD), trabecular microstructure contributes to skeletal strength. Our goal was to examine changes in trabecular microstructure in women on therapy. Materials and methods: We followed 10 postmenopausal women receiving a bisphosphonate, risedronate (35 mg once weekly), over 12 months and examined trabecular microarchitecture with high resolution wrist MR images (hr-MRI). MRI parameters included bone volume/total volume (BV/TV), surface density (representing plates), curve density (representing rods), surface-to-curve ratio and erosion index (depicting deterioration). We assessed BMD of the spine, hip and radius and markers of bone turnover. Results: Women had been receiving bisphosphonate therapy for 43±9 months (mean±SD) prior to the first MRI. Indices of hr-MRI demonstrated improvement in surface-to-curve ratio (13.0%) and a decrease in erosion index (12.1%) consistent with less deterioration (both p<0.05). BMD of the spine, hip and radius and markers of bone turnover remained stable. Parameters of hr-MRI were associated with 1/3 distal radius BMD (correlation coefficient 0.71 to 0.86, p<0.05). Discussion: We conclude that hr-MRI of the radius demonstrates improvements in trabecular microstructure not appreciated by conventional BMD and provides additional information on parameters that contribute to structural integrity in patients on antiresorptive therapy. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.

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