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An interview with Major Ola Petter Odden, Army Combat Lab Development Officer, ahead of keynote address at Future Armoured Vehicles Situational Awareness 2017. London, United Kingdom, December 15, 2016 --( Drawing from user experiences, his keynote address will provide case study examples on situational awareness and information sharing in Norwegian mechanised battalions. An update on new CV90 capabilities and future plans to develop battlefield connectivity will also be given. With over 15 years of experience on working mainly with user requirements, materiel development and experimentation, Major Odden has been in his current role as a Development Officer in Combat Lab - the Norwegian Army’s Concept Development and Experimentation section, since 2008. He has contributed to Vehicle Design Scenarios in the Overall Architectural Concept in the MILVA NATO GVA working group. In the run-up to his keynote address, SMi Group caught up with Major Odden to discuss current developments, capability challenges and his upcoming talk. When asked about the implications of a standardised human machine interface on board a military vehicle, he said, “I believe in will have benefits with regards to acquisition, documentation, training and even operational use. As personnel will have to function across a number of platforms or workstations, a common interface will make the transition easier. And I think it’s better to be very proficient in using a mediocre HMI, rather than being mediocre at operating the “best” HMI in the world.” On obstacles associated with the integration of C4i systems into existing platforms he commented, “At one point the cost of integrating new C4I(SR) on a legacy platform outweighs the benefits: It’ may be very labour intensive because you must remove a lot of components to gain access, maybe weight increases and you must upgrade engine, gearbox and suspension, space issues may force you to remove something else (ammunition, a seat etc). I think we sometimes hang on to old platforms way too long, even though vehicle platform cost is really not that high compared to system cost.” The full interview is available to read at http://www.smi-online.co.uk/2017armouredvehicles-situational-awareness.asp#tab_downloads Future Armoured Vehicles Situational Awareness 29th & 30th Mar 2017 London, UK www.armouredvehicles-sa.com Sponsored by: Galleon Embedded Computing, Instro Precision Ltd, Microflown Technologies, Palomar Display Products and RFEL Contact information: For media enquiries contact Teri Arri on Tel: +44 20 7827 6162 / Email: tarri@smi-online.co.uk To register onto the event visit www.armouredvehicles-sa.com or contact James Hitchen on Tel +44 (0) 207 827 6054 / Email jhitchen@smi-online.co.uk For sponsorship packages contact Justin Predescu Tel: +44 (0) 207 827 6130 / Email: jpredescu@smi-online.co.uk About SMi Group: Established since 1993, the SMi Group is a global event-production company that specializes in Business-to-Business Conferences, Workshops, Masterclasses and online Communities. We create and deliver events in the Defence, Security, Energy, Utilities, Finance and Pharmaceutical industries. We pride ourselves on having access to the world’s most forward thinking opinion leaders and visionaries, allowing us to bring our communities together to Learn, Engage, Share and Network. More information can be found at http://www.smi-online.co.uk London, United Kingdom, December 15, 2016 --( PR.com )-- SMi Group will welcome the expertise of Major Ola Petter Odden from the Norwegian Army Combat Lab, at the only dedicated event on combat vehicle C4ISTAR and systems integration when he presents at Future Armoured Vehicles Situational Awareness next March.Drawing from user experiences, his keynote address will provide case study examples on situational awareness and information sharing in Norwegian mechanised battalions. An update on new CV90 capabilities and future plans to develop battlefield connectivity will also be given.With over 15 years of experience on working mainly with user requirements, materiel development and experimentation, Major Odden has been in his current role as a Development Officer in Combat Lab - the Norwegian Army’s Concept Development and Experimentation section, since 2008. He has contributed to Vehicle Design Scenarios in the Overall Architectural Concept in the MILVA NATO GVA working group.In the run-up to his keynote address, SMi Group caught up with Major Odden to discuss current developments, capability challenges and his upcoming talk.When asked about the implications of a standardised human machine interface on board a military vehicle, he said, “I believe in will have benefits with regards to acquisition, documentation, training and even operational use. As personnel will have to function across a number of platforms or workstations, a common interface will make the transition easier. And I think it’s better to be very proficient in using a mediocre HMI, rather than being mediocre at operating the “best” HMI in the world.”On obstacles associated with the integration of C4i systems into existing platforms he commented, “At one point the cost of integrating new C4I(SR) on a legacy platform outweighs the benefits: It’ may be very labour intensive because you must remove a lot of components to gain access, maybe weight increases and you must upgrade engine, gearbox and suspension, space issues may force you to remove something else (ammunition, a seat etc). I think we sometimes hang on to old platforms way too long, even though vehicle platform cost is really not that high compared to system cost.”The full interview is available to read at http://www.smi-online.co.uk/2017armouredvehicles-situational-awareness.asp#tab_downloadsFuture Armoured Vehicles Situational Awareness29th & 30th Mar 2017London, UKwww.armouredvehicles-sa.comSponsored by: Galleon Embedded Computing, Instro Precision Ltd, Microflown Technologies, Palomar Display Products and RFELContact information:For media enquiries contact Teri Arri on Tel: +44 20 7827 6162 / Email: tarri@smi-online.co.ukTo register onto the event visit www.armouredvehicles-sa.com or contact James Hitchen on Tel +44 (0) 207 827 6054 / Email jhitchen@smi-online.co.ukFor sponsorship packages contact Justin Predescu Tel: +44 (0) 207 827 6130 / Email: jpredescu@smi-online.co.ukAbout SMi Group: Established since 1993, the SMi Group is a global event-production company that specializes in Business-to-Business Conferences, Workshops, Masterclasses and online Communities. We create and deliver events in the Defence, Security, Energy, Utilities, Finance and Pharmaceutical industries. We pride ourselves on having access to the world’s most forward thinking opinion leaders and visionaries, allowing us to bring our communities together to Learn, Engage, Share and Network. More information can be found at http://www.smi-online.co.uk Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from SMi Group


Tijs E.,Microflown Technologies BV | Wind J.,Microflown Technologies BV | Fernandez Comesana D.,Microflown Technologies BV
SAE Technical Papers | Year: 2011

All surfaces of a cabin interior may contribute to the sound pressure at a certain reference position, e.g. the human's ear. Panel noise contribution analysis (PNCA) involves the measurement of the contribution of separate areas. This is an effective method to determine the effect of apparent noise sources at a specific location. This paper presents the latest developments on particle velocity based panel noise contribution analysis. In contrast to the traditional methods, the particle velocity approach is faster; it requires 3 days instead of weeks. While the theoretical base of the procedure in this paper is similar to previously published particle velocity based procedure, here the measurement protocol has now been simplified dramatically, which has reduced the measurement time even more to less than a day. The method and its implementation are explained in the paper and a full measurement procedure is reported. Four steps are required to determine and visualize the pressure contribution of the vehicle interior. In a first step, probes are positioned on predefined interior surfaces. Special probe mounting have been made to decrease the handling time. The second step is a measurement in a certain mode of operation. This step can be done in a laboratory but it is also possible to perform the measurement whilst driving the vehicle on the road. Stationary as well as non stationary running conditions like run ups are accessible and do not limit the applicability of the method. The third step is the determination of the transfer paths from the panels to a certain listening position. This measurement is done assuming reciprocity. A monopole source is placed on the listener position and the sound pressure is measured at the surface. In a fourth and last step the transfer paths are linked with the operational data gathered in step two. The results are then visualized using the predefined geometry model. This paper describes the measurement of a conventional car with a resolution of 137 panels. Since an array of 46 probes was used step 2 and step 3 are repeated 3 times. Copyright © 2011 SAE International.


Fernandez Comesana D.,Microflown Technologies BV | Wind J.,Microflown Technologies BV
SAE Technical Papers | Year: 2011

There are several methods to capture and visualize the acoustic properties in the vicinity of an object. This article considers scanning PU probe based sound intensity and particle velocity measurements which capture both sound pressure and acoustic particle velocity. The properties of the sound field are determined and visualized using the following routine: while the probe is moved slowly over the surface, the pressure and velocity are recorded and a video image is captured at the same time. Next, the data is processed. At each time interval, the video image is used to determine the location of the sensor. Then a color plot is generated. This method is called the Scan and Paint method. Since only one probe is used to measure the sound field the spatial phase information is lost. It is also impossible to find out if sources are correlated or not. This information is necessary to determine the sound pressure some distance from the source, at the driver's ear for example. In this paper, the method of Scan and Paint is enhanced in such way that it is possible to handle partial correlated sources. The key of the novel method is having a pressure microphone at the listener position which is used as a reference sensor. With all this data, it is possible to derive the spatial phase of the sources measured relative to the listening position. Copyright © 2011 SAE International.


Grosso A.,Microflown Technologies BV | De Bree H.-E.,Microflown Technologies BV | Steltenpool S.,Microflown Technologies BV | Tijs E.,Microflown Technologies BV
SAE Technical Papers | Year: 2011

Leakage ranking of vehicle cabin interiors is an important quality index for a car. Noise transmission through weak areas has an important role in the interior noise of a car. Nowadays the acoustic leakage inside a cabin can be measured with different techniques: Microphone array-based holography, Trasmission loss measurement, Beamforming analysis, Sound intensity P-P measurements and ultrasound waves measurements. Some advantages and limits of those measurement approaches for quantifying the acoustic performance of a car are discussed in the first part of this paper. In the second part a new method for fast leakage detection and stationary noise mapping is presented using the Microflown PU probe. This method is called Scan & Paint. The Microflown sensor can measure directly the particle velocity which in the near field is much less affected by background noise and reflection compared with normal microphones. This makes the sensor very suitable for measurements inside a complex and reactive environment like the interior of the car. A camera is used to film the sweep measurement procedure of some surfaces in the cabin interior of a Toyota Avensis. The audio data is processed and synchronized with the video data. A velocity or intensity colormap can be calculated for the different interior parts of the car under test. Copyright © 2011 SAE International.


Fernandez Comesana D.,Microflown Technologies BV | Zjamsek B.,Microflown Technologies BV | Grosso A.,Microflown Technologies BV | Holland K.,Institute of Sound and Vibration Research
SAE Technical Papers | Year: 2013

Exterior noise testing is one of the main standardized quality controls required for developing the majority of vehicles. The combination of static tests and on-road measurements provides an essential key to undertaking a successful refinement process. Beamforming techniques using phased microphone arrays are one of the most common tools for localizing and quantifying noise sources across the vehicle body. However, the use of such devices can result in a series of well-known disadvantages regarding, for instance, their very high cost or transducer calibration problems. Virtual Phased Arrays (VPAs) are proposed as an alternative solution to prevent these difficulties providing the sound field is time stationary. Several frequency domain beamforming techniques can be adapted to only use the relative phase between a fixed and a moving transducer. Therefore the results traditionally obtained using large arrays can be emulated by applying beamforming algorithms to data acquired from two sensors. Simulations and experimental data presented in this paper introduce a first approach to use virtual phased arrays for assessing complex noise problems, such as vehicle exterior noise radiation. Copyright © 2013 SAE International.

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