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Patent
Novozymes AS and Microbiogen Pty. Ltd | Date: 2015-03-20

The invention relates to improved processes of producing ethanol from starch-containing material wherein saccharification and/or fermentation is done at a temperature below the initial gelatinization temperature in the presence of glucoamylase and alpha-amylase, and optionally a protease and/or a cellulolytic enzyme composition; wherein the fermenting organism is Saccharomyces cerevisiae MBG4851 (deposited under Accession No. V14/004037 at National Measurement Institute, Victoria, Australia) or a fermenting organism strain having properties that are about the same as that of Saccharomyces cerevisiae MBG4851, or a derivative of Saccharomyces strain V14/004037 having defining characteristics of strain V14/004037, and compositions comprising a Saccharomyces yeast strain of the invention and naturally occurring and/or non-naturally occurring components.


Patent
Novozymes AS and Microbiogen Pty Ltd | Date: 2017-02-08

The present invention relates to processes for producing ethanol from starch-containing material by liquefying the starch-containing material at a temperature above the initial gelatinization temperature using an alpha-amylase; saccharifying using a glucoamylase and fermenting using a Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strain deposited under Accession No. V14/004037 at National Measurement Institute, Victoria, Australia) or a fermenting organism strain having properties that are about the same as that of the deposited Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain or a derivative of Saccharomyces strain V14/004037 having the defining characteristics of strain V14/004037. The invention also relates to a Saccharomyces yeast strain deposited under the Budapest Treaty and having NMI accession no. V14/004037 or a derivative of strain V14/004037 which exhibits one or more defining characteristics of strain V14/004037. The invention also relates to a process of recovering/extracting oil from an ethanol process of the invention using a Saccharomyces strain of the invention and compositions comprising a Saccharomyces yeast strain of the invention and naturally occurring and/or non- naturally occurring components.


Kollaras A.,Microbiogen Pty Ltd. | Kavanagh J.M.,University of Sydney | Bell G.L.,Microbiogen Pty Ltd. | Purkovic D.,Microbiogen Pty Ltd. | And 12 more authors.
Bioresource Technology | Year: 2011

The performance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae MBG3964, a strain able to tolerate >18% v/v ethanol, was compared to leading industrial ethanol strain, Fermentis Ethanol Red, under high gravity corn mash fermentation conditions. Compared to the industrial ethanol strain, MBG3964 gave increased alcohol yield (140gL -1 vs. 126gL -1), lower residual sugar (4gL -1 vs. 32gL -1), and lower glycerol (11gL -1 vs. 12gL -1). After 72h fermentation, MBG3964 showed about 40% viability, whereas the control yeast was only about 3% viable. Based on modelling, the higher ethanol tolerant yeast could increase the profitability of a corn-ethanol plant and help it remain viable through higher production, lower unit heating requirements and extra throughput. A typical 50Mgaly -1 dry mill ethanol plant that sells dried distiller's grain could potentially increase its profit by nearly $US3.4My -1 due solely to the extra yield, and potentially another $US4.1My -1 if extra throughput is possible. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.


Kollaras A.,Microbiogen Pty Ltd | Koutouridis P.,Microbiogen Pty Ltd | Moore M.J.B.,Microbiogen Pty Ltd | Bell P.J.L.,Microbiogen Pty Ltd | Attfield P.V.,Microbiogen Pty Ltd
International Sugar Journal | Year: 2011

The feasibility of a lignocellulosic biorefinery that produces fuel ethanol and yeast for feed is evaluated within a sugarcane bagasse context. The proposed biorefinery combines next generation ethanol technology with an innovative non-recombinant strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This patented, natural yeast not only efficiently ferments conventional sugars to ethanol, but has the ability to aerobically convert xylose, glycerol and acetate into high protein yeast biomass for potential use as cattle, swine, poultry and aquaculture feed. Experimental results demonstrate the yeast's ability to convert bagasse-derived wood molasses into valuable products. Process modelling based upon these experimental results suggest it is possible to provide an additional revenue stream to a sugarcane mill with no change in land usage.


Kollaras A.,Microbiogen Pty Ltd. | Koutouridis P.,Microbiogen Pty Ltd. | Moore M.,Microbiogen Pty Ltd. | Bell P.,Microbiogen Pty Ltd. | Attfield P.,Microbiogen Pty Ltd.
33rd Annual Conference of the Australian Society of Sugar Cane Technologists 2011, ASSCT 2011 | Year: 2011

THE FEASIBILITY of a lignocellulosic biorefinery that produces fuel ethanol and yeast for feed is evaluated within a sugarcane bagasse context. The proposed biorefinery combines next generation ethanol technology with an innovative non-recombinant strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This patented, natural yeast not only efficiently ferments conventional sugars to ethanol, but has the ability to aerobically convert xylose, glycerol and acetate into high protein yeast biomass for potential use as cattle, swine, poultry and aquaculture feed. Experimental results demonstrate the yeast's ability to convert bagasse-derived wood molasses into valuable products. Process modelling based upon these experimental results suggest it is possible to provide an additional revenue stream to a sugarcane mill with no change in land usage.


Patent
Microbiogen Pty Ltd. | Date: 2014-09-04

The present invention relates to methods for producing Saccharomyces strains that are capable of growth on xylose as a sole carbon source at a desired growth rate, (such as at least one generation per 48 hours), strains made by such methods, and Saccharomyces strains that grow at a growth rate of at least one generation per 48 hours using xylose as a sole carbon source for growth made by non-recombinant methods.


Patent
Microbiogen Pty Ltd. | Date: 2012-08-20

The present invention relates to methods for producing Saccharomyces strains that are capable of growth on xylose as a sole carbon source at a desired growth rate, (such as at least one generation per 48 hours), strains made by such methods, and Saccharomyces strains that grow at a growth rate of at least one generation per 48 hours using xylose as a sole carbon source for growth made by non-recombinant methods.

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