Microbial Safety Division

NAAS, South Korea

Microbial Safety Division

NAAS, South Korea

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Kim S.-R.,Microbial Safety Division | Lee J.-Y.,Microbial Safety Division | Lee S.-H.,Microbial Safety Division | Ko H.-S.,Knowledge and Information Office | And 8 more authors.
Korean Journal of Food Science and Technology | Year: 2011

The prevalence and distribution of hazardous microorganisms were investigated from the major perilla cultivation area at Milyang, Gyeongnam province, Korea. Aerobic plate count (APC) and coliform count of perilla leaves were 4.82 log CFU/g and 3.85 log CFU/g, respectively. E. coli, S. aureus and B. cereus were detected in 3.0% (4/114), 7.9% (9/114) and 46.5% (53/114) of examined perilla leaves. However, E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella spp, and L. monocytogenes were not detected. The distribution of hazardous microorganisms in perilla leaf cultivation environment were compared and the concentration of APC and coliform counts were more than 3.0 log CFU/(mL, g, 100 cm2, hand) from most of the samples. S. aureus were detected from irrigation water, packing table, packing vinyl, hand, and clothes. Also, B. cereus was frequently detected from the examined samples. Especially, packing table and collection container were contaminated with maximum 5.5 log CFU/100 cm2 of B. cereus. Good Agricultural Practice (GAP) system should be introduced to farms to enhance the safety of perilla leaves. © The Korean Society of Food Science and Technology.


Kim S.-R.,Microbial Safety Division | Lee J.-Y.,Microbial Safety Division | Lee S.-H.,Microbial Safety Division | Ryu K.-Y.,Microbial Safety Division | And 8 more authors.
Korean Journal of Food Science and Technology | Year: 2011

Two-hundred Bacillus cereus isolated from perilla leaf cultivation areas in Miryang, Korea were investigated for toxin genes and antibiotic susceptibility. Toxigenic patterns of isolates were identified to be 11 groups through toxin gene profiles. 21% of strains isolated from the perilla leaves had both enterotoxin and emetic toxin. Toxin genes entFM (100%), nheA (100%) and hblA, C, D (65.5%) were frequently found in the perilla leaves, whereas EM (21.0%) was less common. Most isolates were susceptible to 10 antibiotics, but they were highly resistant to penicillin (100%), ampicillin (100%), oxacillin (94.9%), amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (95.6%), cefazolin (78.2%), and rifampicin (58.0%). These results indicate that food-borne outbreak caused by B. cereus might lead to diarrhea and emetic syndromes. © The Korean Society of Food Science and Technology.


Shim W.-B.,Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology | Lee C.-W.,Gyeongsang National University | Jeong M.-J.,Gyeongsang National University | Kim J.-S.,Gyeongsang National University | And 3 more authors.
Korean Journal of Food Science and Technology | Year: 2014

To analyze the hazards associated with cucumber and hot pepper cultivation areas, a total of 72 samples were obtained and tested to detect the presence of biological (sanitary indicative, pathogenic bacteria and fungi) and chemical hazards (heavy metals and pesticide residues). The levels of sanitary indicative bacteria (aerobic plate counts and coliforms) and fungi were ND-7.2 and ND-4.8 log CFU/(g, mL, hand, or 100 cm2) in cucumber cultivation areas, and ND- 6.8 and 0.4-5.3 log CFU/(g, mL, hand, or 100 cm2) in hot pepper cultivation areas. More specifically, the soil of hot pepper cultivation areas was contaminated with coliforms at a maximum level of 5.6 log CFU/g. Staphylococcus aureus was detected only in glove samples at a level of 1.4 log CFU/100 cm2 and Bacillus cereus was detected in the majority of samples at a level of ND-4.8 log CFU/(g, mL, hand, or 100 cm2). Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Salmonella spp. were not detected. Heavy metal (Zn, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Hg) chemical hazards were detected at levels lower than the regulation limit. Residual insecticides were not detected in cucumbers; however, hexaconazole was detected at a level of 0.016 mg/kg (maximum residue limit: 0.3 mg/kg) in hot peppers.©The Korean Society of Food Science and Technology 2014.

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