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News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.marketwired.com

EDMONTON, AB--(Marketwired - Oct 24, 2016) -  Micralyne Inc., a leading manufacturer of MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) and a primary supplier of sensors used in Internet of Things (IoT) applications, has restructured manufacturing operations to respond to the increased market demand for sensors and other MEMS products. To prepare for diverse and potentially very high-volume requirements of IoT, Micralyne has appointed Darrell Mathison, a 30-year industry veteran with high-growth companies, as chief operating officer. Mathison will oversee all manufacturing operations, product engineering and facilities at Micralyne, effective immediately. The IoT is driving several technology sectors as volumes of connected devices have risen steadily for the last decade. Spanning smart home products, connected automobiles, remote medical and environmental monitoring, and even smartphones, the IoT market is surging. In fact, the analyst firm IHS Markit predicts that the IoT market will grow from 30.7 billion devices in 2020 to 75.4 billion in 2025.i Volumes of MEMS and sensors will increase accordingly. Jérémie Bouchaud, director for MEMS & Sensors, IHS Markit predicts that the overall number of MEMS and semiconductor sensors -- in part driven by IoT markets -- will reach 43 billion by 2020.ii "Micralyne's primary mission in 2017 is to get market-ready for the massive demand for MEMS and sensors required to supply the IoT," said Ian Roane, CEO of Micralyne. "Bringing exceptional leadership and experience as an operations professional to our company -- as well as the vision and drive to address present and future growth opportunities -- I am delighted to welcome Darrell Mathison to Micralyne." Darrell Mathison brings over 30 years of experience with high-growth companies, having worked in the oil and gas, construction, mining, banking and high-tech industries in Alberta, Canada. A previous CFO of Micralyne, from 2010-2011, Mathison returns to the company in the manufacturing and operations capacity in which he has significant expertise. Mathison holds a MBA degree from Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh, Scotland and holds a CPA, CMA designation. "Micralyne's exceptional array of customers requires a proven manufacturing partner that can deliver operational excellence, expanded capabilities and unprecedented quality," said Darrell Mathison, COO, Micralyne. "The Micralyne operations team continues to exceed customer expectations in all of these areas, and I am honored to join this group of manufacturing professionals." About Micralyne Inc. Micralyne is one of the world's leading independent developers and manufacturers of MEMS and micro-fabricated products. Serving the worldwide growth in sensor applications, Micralyne is a key provider of MEMS sensors and other micro-structures that differentiate exciting applications such as IoT devices, implantable medical devices and optical communications. Headquartered in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, Micralyne's diverse customer base includes Fortune 500 companies, mid-range industrial and biomedical companies, and pioneering high-tech start-ups. With a proven manufacturing track record and a rich development history, Micralyne commercializes complex MEMS devices to enable the intelligence and interactivity of its customers' products. In January of 2015, Micralyne was acquired by FTC Technologies. ii Results based on IHS Markit Technology MEMS & Sensors Intelligence Service, 2016. Results are not an endorsement of Micralyne. Any reliance on these results is at the third party's own risk. Visit technology.ihs.com for more details.


Patent
University of Alberta, National Research Council Canada and Micralyne Inc. | Date: 2014-09-24

Method and apparatus for producing glancing angle deposited thin films. There is a source of collimated vapour flux, the source of collimated vapour flux having a deposition field; and a travelling substrate disposed within the deposition field of the source of collimated vapour flux, the collimated vapor flux being collimated at a defined non-zero angle to a normal to the travelling substrate.


Zhang P.,University of Alberta | Fitzpatrick G.,Micralyne Inc. | Harrison T.,University of Alberta | Moussa W.A.,University of Alberta | Zemp R.J.,University of Alberta
Journal of Microelectromechanical Systems | Year: 2012

Despite myriad potential advantages over piezoelectric ultrasound transducers, capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducers (CMUTs) have not yet seen widespread commercial implementation. The possible reasons for this may include key issues of the following: 1) long-term device reliability and 2) electrical safety issues associated with relatively high voltage electrodes on device surfaces which could present an electrical safety hazard to patients. A CMUT design presented here may mitigate some of these problems. Dielectric charging is one phenomenon which can lead to unpredictable performance and device failure. Using a previously published 1-D model of dielectric charging, we link minimal dielectric surface roughness with minimal dielectric charging. Previous studies of Fowler-Nordheim tunneling suggest that minimal-surface- roughness electrodes could lead to minimal transdielectric currents (and, hence, slower dielectric charging rates). These principles guided our device architecture, leading us to engineer near atomically smooth electrodes and dielectric surfaces to minimize dielectric charging. To provide maximum electrical safety to future patients, CMUT devices were engineered with the top membrane serving as a ground electrode. While multiple CMUT elements have not been individually addressable in most such designs to our knowledge, we introduce a fabrication method involving two silicon-on-insulator wafers with a step to define individually addressable electrodes. Our devices are modeled using a finite-element package. Measured deflections show excellent agreement with modeled performance. We test for charge effects by studying deflection hysteresis during snapdown and snapback cycles in the limit of long snapdown durations to simulate maximal-dielectric-charging conditions. Devices were also tested in long-term actuation tests and subjected to more than 3 × 10 10 cycles without failure. © 2012 IEEE.


Poshtiban S.,University of Alberta | Singh A.,University of Alberta | Fitzpatrick G.,Micralyne Inc. | Evoy S.,University of Alberta
Sensors and Actuators, B: Chemical | Year: 2013

Increasing concerns about food safety have prompted strong interest in the development of new pathogen detection technologies. The currently used techniques usually rely on specially equipped laboratories and are labor-intensive and time-consuming. Microresonator-based biosensors incorporating specific biorecognition probes are promising for the development of highly sensitive bacterial detection sensors. We present an optimized microresonator array platform that uses phage tail-spike proteins as a recognition probe. This array is composed of one thousand beams in a small area (i.e. 13.5 mm2 area) and therefore offers large surface area for capture of bacteria. These resonators feature a high natural frequency due to the optimized beam design, with the first resonance frequency at f0 = 1.095 ± 0.005 MHz. Theoretical analysis of these devices indicates a high mass sensitivity with a threshold for the detection of added mass as small as δm = 52 fg (lighter than a single bacterial cell). FEA and the experimental results show that the frequency shift is mainly due to the mass loading effect of adsorbed bacteria. We have successfully demonstrated the application of these arrays for specific detection of Campylobacter jejuni cells after immobilization of devices with phage GST-Gp48 tail-spike proteins. TSP-functionalized devices did not show any sensitivity to Escherichia coli bacteria confirming the specificity of detection. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.


Zhang P.,University of Alberta | Fitzpatrick G.,Micralyne Inc. | Moussa W.,University of Alberta | Zemp R.J.,University of Alberta
Proceedings - IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium | Year: 2010

Capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducers (CMUTs) offer many potential advantages over piezoelectric transducers, but have not yet seen widespread implementation. Possible reasons for this may include key issues of (1) long-term device reliability and (2) electrical safety issues associated with relatively high voltage electrodes on device surfaces which could present an electrical safety hazard to patients. A double SOI CMUT design which addresses both these issues is presented. A 1-D model of dielectric surface charging, which suggests that minimal surface roughness of the dielectric layer can minimize surface charge accumulation is also proposed. Fabricated devices are engineered to minimize dielectric surface roughness. To provide maximum electrical safety to future patients, CMUT devices were engineered with the top membrane serving as a ground electrode. Bottom electrodes are individually-addressable. Our devices were modeled using a finite-element package. The experiment results show excellent agreement with modeled performance. Charge effects were explored by studying deflection hysteresis during snapdown and snapback cycles in the limit of long snapdown durations to simulate maximal dielectric charging conditions. © 2010 IEEE.


Patent
Micralyne Inc. | Date: 2012-12-27

A MEMS arrangement is provided that has a top plane containing a rotatable element such as a mirror. There is a middle support frame plane, and a lower electrical substrate plane. The rotatable element is supported by a support frame formed in the middle support frame plane so as to be rotatable with respect to the frame in a first axis of rotation. The frame is mounted so as to be rotatable with respect to a second axis of rotation. Rotation in the first axis of rotation is substantially independent of rotation in the second axis of rotation.


Patent
Micralyne Inc. | Date: 2010-06-30

A MEMS arrangement is provided that has a top plane containing a rotatable element such as a mirror. There is a middle support frame plane, and a lower electrical substrate plane. The rotatable element is supported by a support frame formed in the middle support frame plane so as to be rotatable with respect to the frame in a first axis of rotation. The frame is mounted so as to be rotatable with respect to a second axis of rotation. Rotation in the first axis of rotation is substantially independent of rotation in the second axis of rotation.


Patent
Micralyne Inc. | Date: 2010-06-01

Methods of fabricating semiconductor sensor devices include steps of fabricating a hermetically sealed MEMS cavity enclosing a MEMS sensor, while forming conductive vias through the device. The devices include a first semi-conductor layer defining at least one conductive via lined with an insulator and having a lower insulating surface; a central dielectric layer above the first semiconductor layer; a second semiconductor layer in contact with the at least one conductive via, and which defines a MEMS cavity; a third semiconductor layer disposed above the second semiconductor layer, and which includes a sensor element aligned with the MEMS cavity; a cap bonded to the third semiconductor to enclose and hermetically seal the MEMS cavity; wherein the third semiconductor layer separates the cap and the second semiconductor layer.


Patent
Micralyne Inc. | Date: 2013-03-05

Methods of fabricating semiconductor sensor devices include steps of fabricating a hermetically sealed MEMS cavity enclosing a MEMS sensor, while forming conductive vias through the device. The devices include a first semi-conductor layer defining at least one conductive via lined with an insulator and having a lower insulating surface; a central dielectric layer above the first semiconductor layer; a second semiconductor layer in contact with the at least one conductive via, and which defines a MEMS cavity; a third semiconductor layer disposed above the second semiconductor layer, and which includes a sensor element aligned with the MEMS cavity; a cap bonded to the third semiconductor to enclose and hermetically seal the MEMS cavity; wherein the third semiconductor layer separates the cap and the second semiconductor layer.


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