Miami Dade, Colombia
Miami Dade, Colombia

Time filter

Source Type

News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

The Community for Accredited Online Schools (AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org) has published it’s 2016-2017 Best Radiology Technician Programs ranking for 2016-2017. An online leader for higher education resources and information, AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org compared data from both online and on-campus programs, highlighting the following schools as those receiving top scores: Clarkson College, Valencia College, Weber State University, Idaho State University and Southern Illinois University Carbondale for four-year schools; Pitt Community College, Owensboro Community & Technical College, Somerset Community College, Washtenaw Community College and Chattanooga State Community College for two-year schools. “With higher median pay and job growth projections than many occupations in the U.S., radiology tech programs are a positive choice for college-bound students,” said Doug Jones, CEO and Founder of the Community for Accredited Online Schools. “Hundreds of radiology tech programs are available around the nation, but this list pinpoints the schools who offer the best combination of affordability, quality and flexibility for aspiring radiology technologists.” In order to qualify for the list, AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org requires all schools with a Radiology Technician program to meet several base criteria points. All colleges and universities must be accredited, two- or four-year public or private not-for-profit institutions. Each schools must also offer career placement services to its grads. Each school was ranked and scored by comparing more than a dozen data points, including cost and financial aid reports, student-teacher ratios and more. A full list of the 2016-2017 Best Radiology Technician Programs in the U.S. is included below. More details on the specific data and methodology used can be found at the link below, along with specific information on where each school placed in the ranking: Two-year schools recognized for providing the Best Radiology Technician Programs: Ashland Community and Technical College Bluegrass Community and Technical College Bunker Hill Community College Cape Fear Community College Chattanooga State Community College Chippewa Valley Technical College Columbus State Community College Community College of Denver Cuyahoga Community College East Central College Eastern Maine Community College Galveston College Georgia Northwestern Technical College Guilford Technical Community College Hagerstown Community College Hillsborough Community College Jefferson Community and Technical College Lakeland Community College Lakeshore Technical College Lone Star College Lorain County Community College Middlesex Community College Mountwest Community and Technical College North Arkansas College Northeast Community College Northwest Mississippi Community College Orangeburg-Calhoun Technical College Owens Community College Owensboro Community and Technical College Pitt Community College Rend Lake College Rhodes State College Roane State Community College Sinclair College Somerset Community College South Arkansas Community College Southcentral Kentucky Community & Technical College Southeast Arkansas College Southeast Community College Southeast Kentucky Community and Technical College Southern Union State Community College SUNY Broome Community College Tallahassee Community College Technical College of the Lowcountry Truckee Meadows Community College Tulsa Community College Washtenaw Community College West Virginia Northern Community College Western Nebraska Community College Western Wyoming Community College Four-year schools recognized for providing the Best Radiology Technician Programs: Arkansas State University - Main Campus Baptist Memorial College of Health Sciences Bellevue College Bluefield State College Boise State University Briar Cliff University Broward College Clarkson College College of Southern Nevada Concordia University - Wisconsin Daytona State College Eastern Florida State College Florida SouthWestern State College Florida State College at Jacksonville Gulf Coast State College Idaho State University Keiser University - Fort Lauderdale La Roche College LIU Post Miami Dade College Minot State University Missouri Southern State University Morehead State University Mount Aloysius College Newman University Notre Dame of Maryland University Palm Beach State College Pensacola State College Saint Catharine College Santa Fe College Shawnee State University Siena Heights University South Florida State College Southern Illinois University - Carbondale Southwestern Oklahoma State University St. Catherine University St. Luke's College St. Petersburg College State College of Florida - Manatee-Sarasota Suffolk University University of Charleston University of Cincinnati - Blue Ash College University of Hartford University of Jamestown University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Sioux Falls University of St Francis Valencia College Vincennes University Weber State University About Us: The Community for Accredited Online Schools (AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org) was founded in 2011 to provide students and parents with quality data and information about pursuing an affordable education that has been certified by an accrediting agency. Our community resource materials and tools span topics such as college accreditation, financial aid, opportunities available to veterans, people with disabilities, as well as online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning programs that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational success. environments that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational and career success.


News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

The Community for Accredited Online Schools (AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org), a leading higher education information and resource provider, has named its Best HVAC (Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning) Degree Programs in the nation for 2016-2017. Comparing both online and on-campus programs across the country, the site found Midland College, Bismarck State College, Ranken Technical College, Florida State College at Jacksonville and Northwestern Michigan College for four-year schools; Truckee Meadows Community College, Terra State Community College, Texas State Technical College Waco, Grayson College and Gadsden State Community College for two-year schools provided the best overall quality and value for students pursuing an HVAC degree. “According to labor statistics, the career outlook for educated HVAC technicians is bright,” said Doug Jones, CEO and Founder of the Community for Accredited Online Schools. “This list pinpoints which two- and four-year schools are offering high quality HVAC training and doing the most to help students maximize success after graduation.” To qualify for the Community for Accredited Online Schools’ Best HVAC Programs list, colleges must comply with several standard requirements. Each must hold regional accreditation and be registered as public or private not-for-profit institutions. Schools must also provide career placement services to students to qualify. The site also weighs over a dozen unique data points on each school, including student-teacher ratios and financial aid availability to determine score and rank. For more details on data analysis and methodology used to determine the Best HVAC Programs in the nation, as well as a complete list of rankings visit: Two-year schools on the Best HVAC Programs list for 2016-2017: Antelope Valley College Belmont College Bevill State Community College Blackhawk Technical College Chippewa Valley Technical College Clark State Community College College of the Sequoias Columbus State Community College Dutchess Community College Edison State Community College Front Range Community College Gadsden State Community College Gateway Technical College Grayson College H. Councill Trenholm State Technical College Iowa Lakes Community College JF Drake State Community and Technical College Kalamazoo Valley Community College Kennebec Valley Community College Lamar Institute of Technology Lawson State Community College - Birmingham Campus Los Angeles Trade Technical College Lurleen B. Wallace Community College Mercer County Community College Monroe Community College Moraine Park Technical College Mott Community College North Dakota State College of Science North Georgia Technical College Northeast Wisconsin Technical College Northwest State Community College Orange Coast College Owens Community College Ozarks Technical Community College Pickens Technical College Riverside City College Sacramento City College San Jose City College Sinclair College Southeastern Community College Southern Maine Community College Stark State College Tarrant County College District Terra State Community College Texas State Technical College - West Texas Texas State Technical College - Waco The Community College of Baltimore County Truckee Meadows Community College Vernon College Wallace Community College - Dothan Four-year schools on the Best HVAC Programs list for 2016-2017: Baker College of Clinton Township Bismarck State College Dunwoody College of Technology Ferris State University Florida State College at Jacksonville Indian River State College Liberty University Miami Dade College Midland College New England Institute of Technology Northern Michigan University Northwestern Michigan College Pennsylvania College of Technology Ranken Technical College SUNY College of Technology at Canton University of Massachusetts - Lowell About Us: The Community for Accredited Online Schools (AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org) was founded in 2011 to provide students and parents with quality data and information about pursuing an affordable education that has been certified by an accrediting agency. Our community resource materials and tools span topics such as college accreditation, financial aid, opportunities available to veterans, people with disabilities, as well as online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning programs that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational success. environments that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational and career success.


News Article | November 18, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

The Community for Accredited Online Schools (AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org) has released it’s ranking of Florida’s Best Vocational and Trade Programs for 2016-2017. The higher education resource and information site chose 38 Florida colleges for the list, highlighting both two- and four-year schools offering on-campus or online trade and vocational training. Schools scoring highest include: Florida State College at Jacksonville, Pensacola State College, Palm Beach State College, Santa Fe College and Daytona State College (four-year schools) and Hillsborough Community College, Tallahassee Community College, City College Altamonte Springs and Hollywood campuses and Charlotte Technical Center (two-year schools). “Most jobs in the U.S. do not require a Bachelor’s level education, and only 30 percent of the labor force in the U.S. has a four-year degree as of 2009,” said Doug Jones, CEO and Founder of the Community for Accredited Online Schools. “These Florida schools are providing excellent education options for students interested in trade or vocational careers, which are projected to be some of the fastest-growing industries in the nation through 2024.” To qualify for placement on Florida’s Best Trade Schools list, the Community for Accredited Online Schools requires colleges to meet several minimum quality standards. Each college must be regionally accredited and carry public or private not-for-profit status. All schools on the list must also offer career placement services to help maximize student success. The site analyzes each qualifying school based on more than a dozen unique factors, such as student-teacher ratios, graduation rates and more to come up with scoring. A full list of the ranking and the data points and methodology used to determine the Best Trade Schools in Florida can be found at: Broward College Chipola College City College - Fort Lauderdale College of Central Florida Daytona State College Eastern Florida State College Florida Gateway College Florida SouthWestern State College Florida State College at Jacksonville Gulf Coast State College Hodges University Indian River State College Johnson & Wales University - North Miami Keiser University - Fort Lauderdale Lake-Sumter State College Miami Dade College Northwest Florida State College Palm Beach State College Pasco-Hernando State College Pensacola State College Polk State College Remington College - Heathrow Campus Remington College - Tampa Campus Santa Fe College Seminole State College of Florida South Florida State College St Petersburg College State College of Florida - Manatee-Sarasota Valencia College Webber International University About Us: The Community for Accredited Online Schools (AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org) was founded in 2011 to provide students and parents with quality data and information about pursuing an affordable education that has been certified by an accrediting agency. Our community resource materials and tools span topics such as college accreditation, financial aid, opportunities available to veterans, people with disabilities, as well as online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning programs that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational success. environments that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational and career success.


News Article | March 2, 2017
Site: motherboard.vice.com

Aidan Augustin had a problem. His marketing company had relocated to Austin, Texas, in the hopes of securing enough venture capital to grow. He quickly realized he had a choice: Stay and fight it out with hundreds of other companies for funds, or move to a smaller market where he'd have to scramble to find willing venture capitalists. Augustin, co-founder of Feathr, made an unconventional move for a serious start-up. He went to Florida. A Florida native, he sees the state as a compromise—an area where he can have access to venture capital and talent without the intense competition and high cost of living found in Austin, New York or Silicon Valley. "Here, we could be a big fish in a small pond," he said of moving his company to Gainesville, Florida. Florida has long been a state divided. Between the sandy beaches filled with retirement homes, Little Havana, the Deep South and its swampy Everglades, the Sunshine State has always resisted a solitary definition. Florida's start-up scene is no different. Several cities are vying for the de facto role of being the state's tech capital, but there's no clear winner yet, even as access to funding increases and entrepreneurs move to the state's urban centers. "I always wonder if we collectively are preventing one city from being especially successful, kind of cannibalizing each other. It might be net better for our state to have one hub." "The start-ups in the state still have a very difficult time raising money compared to hubs in New York, Texas—and of course Boston and California." As enthusiasm for start-ups has spread over the past three years, the cities of Miami, Orlando, Tampa and Gainesville have emerged as the likely candidates to one day be the state's own Silicon Valley. In fact, the state has a history of successful start-ups: The music-streaming giant Grooveshark and virtual reality platform Magic Leap both got their start in Florida. But while some in the tech industry say each city has its own niche market, others worry limited venture capital is being spread too thin. "Florida's start-up scene is trending upwards with hubs in Gainesville, Orlando, and Miami specifically," University of Florida business professor Jim Parrino said. "The start-ups in the state still have a very difficult time raising money compared to hubs in New York, Texas—and of course Boston and California." Ricardo Mesquita, CEO of The Lab Miami, said South Florida's tech scene is focused on hospitality, hospitals, tourism and Latin America—much like the city itself. Miami Beach and downtown Miami are dotted with a half-dozen hospitals, while the city's entrepreneurs are incubating businesses focused on virtual doctor visits, digitized hospital records, and nanoparticle drug delivery. A quick trip up three hours north, and you'll find the tech scene is more focused on a new space race, including tapping into commercial space travel. Small-scale companies exist alongside tech behemoths like SpaceX and Blue Origin. Earthrise Space, for example, is a non-profit agency that selects college students to work on commercial and government space contracted projects and aims to be part of the team that wins Google's Lunar XPrize for landing the first private rover on the moon. One Orlando company, brandVR, creates virtual reality experiences at Kennedy Space Center. "Almost every major city in Florida has a start-up tech scene," Augustin said. "I always wonder if we collectively are preventing one city from being especially successful, kind of cannibalizing each other. It might be net better for our state to have one hub." Inside The Lab Miami, a popular co-working space for start-ups, employees from 3D printing businesses work steps away from app developers, technology lawyers, and day traders. Mesquita said Miami's start-up scene is differentiated by its immersion in the South and Central American markets, as well as its ability to offer Hispanic entrepreneurs entry into US markets. "We have a lot of entrepreneurs coming in from Latin America. They want to set up their businesses here to launch them in the American market," he said. "I think that Miami still has the connectivity, the diversity, the connection to Latin America that doesn't happen elsewhere." Businesses that thrive are often focused on providing services for the area's biggest industries: namely, its hospitals and hotels. South Florida is home to burgeoning start-ups like Modernizing Medicine, a medical tools business founded in 2010 that is valued at more than $91 million, and mobile finance company YellowPepper, valued at $39 million. Uber and Apple recently opened branches in the area, too. The venture capital also started pouring in last year—although The Miami Herald recently reported VC funding waned in 2016—and incubators are setting up shop, including Miami Dade College's The Idea Center backed by the Knight Foundation. The swath of the state from Tampa through Orlando to Cape Canaveral has been dubbed the "High-Tech Corridor" by a collection of local economic development organizations, and tech ventures there are typically focused on electrical engineering, communications, wireless and problems related to commercial space flight. Gainesville's start-up scene is smaller, but as the home to STEM-focused University of Florida, it has a steady source of early employees. The university opened a co-working start-up space, the Florida Innovation Hub, in 2012 to provide matching funds and mentoring to help students' companies get off the ground. The building is now filled with about two-dozen start-ups, University of Florida spokesman Steve Orlando said. But the heart of Gainesville's start-up scene came from a now-defunct business. The city's biggest start-up, Grooveshark, collapsed in 2015 after a legal battle with Universal Music Group, Sony Music Entertainment, and Warner Music Group over copyright issues. This ended up spinning off a dozen or so new businesses from former employees, Augustin said. Despite the crash of the music streaming business, Gainesville-based Admiral CEO Dan Rua and Augustin each attribute their current businesses in part to Grooveshark. "When forest fires happen, it creates entirely new growth. When you have layoffs, it creates this next explosion," said Rua, who had been an investor in Grooveshark. "When they were wrapping up last year, Facebook and Google [were] flying in to pick up this talent with big packages… Everyone at Admiral is a former Groovesharker." Despite the half-dozen university-funded student incubators across the state, the input from various city chamber of commerce departments and the lack of a state income tax, Florida has a long way to go before it's ready to compete with New York, Silicon Valley and Austin, Texas. Experts said that barrier has less to do with a lack of a tech capital, but much more to do with a lack of capital. "There's actually a lot of money in the state of Florida, private capital, but most of these people are not active angel investors," Augustin said. Rua, who spent much of his career as an investor, said the network for getting private individuals' money into start-ups isn't there yet. Forbes magazine notes out of the nation's 400 richest people, 40 call Florida home. Plus there are about 383,000 millionaire households in the state. So far, they've preferred to spend their money on real estate and other investments, Rua said. But he thinks they could be convinced to become angel investors if they see the potential. "The big missing piece is the capital. We have the talent, we have the tech," Rua said. "The state needs more early-stage funds. It remains an absolute green field." That lack of funding, especially early-stage investors, will continue to hold Florida back, Parrino said. "Although Florida is one of the largest states in the country by population, the share of VC dollars coming to the state is less than 2 percent of the [national] total of VC funding on an annual basis," he said in an email to Motherboard. "Traditional series A investors that would historically invest in seed rounds have mostly moved to a funding criteria that requires proof of concept (meaning revenue generating companies)," Parrino added. "This has made it increasingly difficult to raise seed financing and angel investing continues to fill the gap in that area." Until the start-up community figures out how to bridge that gap, they'll keep growing and honing their niche environments—all competing for the same small pile of cash. "There just was not sophisticated early-stage capital," Rua said. "Early-stage VC funders that will get involved when there's no income or little income are the lifeblood of areas like Silicon Valley or Austin." Get six of our favorite Motherboard stories every day by signing up for our newsletter.


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: www.PR.com

beYOUteous, a handcrafted jewelry line started by Lawrence Jean-Louis, will be a participating maker at the Miami Maker Faire taking place at Miami Dade College's Wolfson campus. West Palm Beach, FL, February 16, 2017 --( Founded by Lawrence Jean-Louis, a creative with a fondness for all things unique and handmade, the name beYOUteous is a play on both the phrase "be you" as well as the word "beauteous." The event will feature inventions and interactive exhibits across the exciting maker movement spectrum, from technology to industrial arts, science, arts, music, crafts, and more! The city of Miami is joining select cities around the world to host larger-scale Maker Faires in 2017, including Rome, Paris, Tokyo, Atlanta, New York and Shenzhen. Maker Faire originated in 2006 in the San Francisco Bay Area as a project of the editors of Make: magazine. It's a gathering of fascinating, curious people who enjoy learning and who love sharing what they can do. Shop online at www.beyouteous.com What: Maker Faire Miami at MDC When: Saturday and Sunday, April 8 – 9, 2017 Where: MDC Wolfson Campus, 300 N.E. Second Ave. West Palm Beach, FL, February 16, 2017 --( PR.com )-- beYOUteous, the line of handcrafted beaded jewelry with the message of embracing individuality, feminine strength, and empowerment will be a participating maker at the Miami Maker Faire taking place at MDC's Wolfson campus in downtown Miami.Founded by Lawrence Jean-Louis, a creative with a fondness for all things unique and handmade, the name beYOUteous is a play on both the phrase "be you" as well as the word "beauteous."The event will feature inventions and interactive exhibits across the exciting maker movement spectrum, from technology to industrial arts, science, arts, music, crafts, and more! The city of Miami is joining select cities around the world to host larger-scale Maker Faires in 2017, including Rome, Paris, Tokyo, Atlanta, New York and Shenzhen.Maker Faire originated in 2006 in the San Francisco Bay Area as a project of the editors of Make: magazine. It's a gathering of fascinating, curious people who enjoy learning and who love sharing what they can do.Shop online at www.beyouteous.comWhat: Maker Faire Miami at MDCWhen: Saturday and Sunday, April 8 – 9, 2017Where: MDC Wolfson Campus, 300 N.E. Second Ave. Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from beYOUteous


News Article | November 23, 2016
Site: news.yahoo.com

President Obama honored actors Robert De Niro, Cicely Tyson, Tom Hanks and Robert Redford with the nation's highest civilian honor. They are among 21 people Obama recognized with the Presidential Medal of Freedom at the White House on Tuesday. Honorees from the sports world include basketball players Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and Michael Jordan, along with veteran broadcaster Vin Scully. Other honorees are philanthropists Bill and Melinda Gates, polymath physicist Richard Garwin, architect Frank Gehry, designer Maya Lin, "Saturday Night Live" producer Lorne Michaels, attorney Newton Minow, mathematician and computer scientist Margaret H. Hamilton, and Eduardo Padrón, president of Miami Dade College in Florida. Posthumous honors went to Native American advocate Elouise Cobell and Rear Adm. Grace Hopper. (AP) See more news-related photo galleries and follow us on Yahoo News Photo Tumblr.


News Article | November 30, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

As community colleges across the nation struggle to improve completion rates, a new RAND Corporation study of an innovative effort providing students with a comprehensive range of support services finds the potential to improve college outcomes. The study examines the participation of four community college systems in the Single Stop U.S.A. Community College Initiative. The study finds that students participating in the program were more likely to persist in attending community college. Single Stop users were at least 3 percentage points more likely to persist into the second year of community college as compared to similar students who did not use the services. "These findings suggest that having a one-stop shop for nonacademic wraparound services and financial support can play a valuable role in promoting student success in college," said Lindsay Daugherty, lead author of the study and a policy researcher at RAND, a nonprofit research organization. The Single Stop U.S.A Community College Initiative is designed to improve the wellbeing of low-income communities by connecting individuals to public benefits and other institutional and community resources in an effort to address nonacademic barriers to college completion. The initiative provides assistance to college students with applications for public benefit programs and other wraparound services that can provide support for housing, food, taxes, childcare, legal services and other essential needs all in a single location on campus. RAND researchers evaluated the Single Stop program and its impact on student post-secondary outcomes. The study examined the experiences of first-time students who made use of Single Stop programs at Bunker Hill Community College in Boston, City University of New York, Delgado Community College in New Orleans and Miami Dade College. The study finds positive impact on postsecondary outcomes at three of the four participating institutions, despite differences in aspects of implementation and student populations. While researchers were unable to examine the impact of many specific services, the study found that tax services had a strong relationship with postsecondary outcomes. One possible explanation of the impact of tax services is the ability to provide students with access to additional funds through the federal Earned Income Tax Credit. The study also found that outcomes were more positive for adult learners age 25 or older and independent students. RAND researchers say the study provides important evidence of the value of an effort that connects students to a network of support programs and access to public benefits as a source of financial support. Institutions should consider how they might offer programs like Single Stop to create a central location for students to access wraparound supports, and to provide students with greater access to government benefits programs and other critical services RAND researchers caution, however, that more work is needed to attribute causal effects to the program and determine how the implementation and context might matter. "This study is just a first step to understanding how programs like Single Stop may benefit community college students," Daugherty said. "More research is needed to understand the effectiveness of programs that connect students to wraparound supports, and to determine how these programs might be effectively scaled to other colleges across the United States." Support for the study was provided by the nonprofit group Single Stop. The study, "Research for Connecting College Students to Alternative Sources of Support," is available at http://www. . Other authors of the study are William R. Johnson and Tiffany Tsai. This research was conducted by RAND Education, a division of the RAND Corporation. Its mission is to bring accurate data and careful, objective analysis to the national debate on education policy.

Loading Miami Dade College collaborators
Loading Miami Dade College collaborators