Miami Childrens Hospital Miami

West and East Lealman, FL, United States

Miami Childrens Hospital Miami

West and East Lealman, FL, United States
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Cantinotti M.,CNR Institute of Neuroscience | Giordano R.,University of Naples Federico II | Emdin M.,CNR Institute of Neuroscience | Assanta N.,CNR Institute of Neuroscience | And 5 more authors.
Echocardiography | Year: 2017

We reviewed echocardiography literature for the assessment and management of semilunar valve disease in children. A search was performed within the National Library of Medicine using the keywords aortic stenosis (AS), aortic regurgitation, pulmonary stenosis (PS), and pulmonary regurgitation in children. The search was further refined adding the keywords-pediatric, neonates, echocardiographic definition, classification, evaluation. Thirty-eight studies were included. For stenotic lesions, there were sufficient consistencies between Doppler and invasive gradients (especially for PS), while other quantitative parameters used in adults showed significant limitations when applied to children. Heterogeneities remain in the range of Doppler measurements utilized to define mild vs moderate vs severe AS/PS, and to guide management. There is sufficient consensus regarding indications for interventions. In regurgitant lesions, there is weak evidence supporting the use of quantitative or semiquantitative parameters after correction for body surface area; clear indications for intervention are lacking. Because adult echocardiographic recommendations cannot be simply translated to the pediatric age, more specific pediatric guidelines and standards for the assessment of semilunar valve disease are needed. © 2017, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


PubMed | Florida Atlantic University, Florida International University and Miami Childrens Hospital Miami
Type: | Journal: Frontiers in psychology | Year: 2015

Modern neuroimaging developments have demonstrated that cognitive functions correlate with brain networks rather than specific areas. The purpose of this paper was to analyze the connectivity of Brocas area based on language tasks.A connectivity modeling study was performed by pooling data of Brocas activation in language tasks. Fifty-seven papers that included 883 subjects in 84 experiments were analyzed. Analysis of Likelihood Estimates of pooled data was utilized to generate the map; thresholds at p < 0.01 were corrected for multiple comparisons and false discovery rate. Resulting images were co-registered into MNI standard space.A network consisting of 16 clusters of activation was obtained. Main clusters were located in the frontal operculum, left posterior temporal region, supplementary motor area, and the parietal lobe. Less common clusters were seen in the sub-cortical structures including the left thalamus, left putamen, secondary visual areas, and the right cerebellum.Brocas area-44-related networks involved in language processing were demonstrated utilizing a pooling-data connectivity study. Significance, interpretation, and limitations of the results are discussed.

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