Metropolitan Water District of Southern California

www.mwdh2o.com
Los Angeles, CA, United States

The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California is the largest supplier of treated water in the US. The name is usually shortened to the "Metropolitan Water District", "the Met", or simply "MWD". It is a cooperative of 14 cities and 12 municipal water districts that indirectly provides water to 18 million people in its 5,200-square-mile service area. It was created by an act of the California Legislature in 1928, primarily to build and operate the Colorado River Aqueduct. MWD became the first contractor to the State Water Project in 1960.It includes parts of Los Angeles, Orange, San Diego, Riverside, San Bernardino and Ventura counties. The district covers primarily the coastal and most heavily populated portions of Southern California; however large portions of San Diego, San Bernardino and Riverside counties are located outside of its service area.The MWD headquarters is located at 700 North Alameda Street in downtown Los Angeles, adjacent to Union Station. Wikipedia.

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News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

Metropolitan’s General Manager Jeffrey Kightlinger and Matt Blashaw, host of HGTV’s Yard Crashers, will kick off the event at the 8:30 a.m. welcoming ceremonies. Seminar guest speakers include Christy Wilhelmi, host of the website Gardenerd; Eli Kaufman of the non-profit River LA; and Mark Daniel and Mark Hall of the Greater Los Angeles County Vector Control District. Exhibitors include representatives from conservation groups, sustainable businesses and water agencies. In addition, students from more than a dozen colleges and trade schools will present innovative approaches to sustainability in an ECO Innovators’ Showcase. For the past decade, the Spring Green Expo has showcased environmentally friendly practices, programs, products and services that save water and promote greener homes and businesses. This year’s seminar topics include “Water Conservation Challenges in Southern California,” “Spring Garden Planning,” and “Reclaiming our Connection to the LA River.” The expo also celebrates Water Awareness Month in May with a water-themed photo exhibit. The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California is a state-established cooperative of 26 cities and water agencies serving nearly 19 million people in six counties. The district imports water from the Colorado River and Northern California to supplement local supplies, and helps its members to develop increased water conservation, recycling, storage and other resource-management programs.


The post-drought good news continued Friday as the State Water Project announced that it was boosting deliveries to the highest levels in 11 years. Most agencies, including the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, will get 85% of the amount they request. Water districts north of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta will get 100%. Earlier this week, the federal Central Valley Project, which provides irrigation water to valley growers, said all of its contractors will get their full contract supply for the first time since 2006. The increases came the same week that Northern California broke its 1983 precipitation record. And the April 1 state snowpack, a key water supply index, was the seventh heaviest on record. The 85% allocation may not be the last word. “We’re hopeful we’ll be able to increase deliveries even more as we monitor conditions,” said Bill Croyle, acting director of the Department of Water Resources, which operates the state project. Damage to the spillways at the state project’s primary reservoir, Lake Oroville, figures into the allocation because officials have to carefully manage lake levels and releases as they embark on repairs. Earlier this week Croyle said his department probably would not make a final allocation call until late May or early June. The San Luis Reservoir, where the federal and state projects park supplies destined for Southern California and San Joaquin growers, filled earlier this spring for the first time in years. That is allowing Metropolitan, the state project’s biggest customer, to rapidly rebuild its depleted regional reserves with deliveries from Northern California. “This could end up being the highest increase in regional storage we’ve ever seen,” Deven Upadhyay, the agency’s water resource manager, said last month.


News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

LOS ANGELES--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Fifth paragraph of release should read: The hope is that some of the students will go on to careers in engineering, alternative energy development, resource management, environment sciences or other related fields, Kalbacher said (instead of The hope is that some of the students will go on to careers in engineering, alternative energy development, resource management, environment sciences or other related fields, Miller said). HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS READY TO CHANNEL THE SUN AT SOLAR CUP Teams of high school students from across Southern California will put their engineering and building skills to the test this weekend as they race the solar-powered boats they spent the last seven months building as part of the Metropolitan Water District’s 15th annual Solar Cup™. The nation’s largest solar-powered boating competition, this year’s Solar Cup includes more than 700 students on teams from 43 high schools from Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino and San Diego counties. They will race in sprint and endurance races at Metropolitan’s Lake Skinner in southwest Riverside County’s Temecula Valley beginning Friday, May 19 and concluding Sunday, May 21. The weekend marks the culmination of a seven-month program in which the students designed and built 16-foot, single-seat boats, powered only by the sun. Along the way, they were taught hands-on lessons in water resources, alternative energy development and sustainability while applying math, science and engineering lessons they learned in the classroom. “These students have learned a lot in the classroom as well as in hands-on technical training workshops held by Metropolitan. They’ve worked together building and brainstorming. Now they’ll have a chance to put all that training and teamwork to use in a fun and exciting competition,” said Solar Cup coordinator Julie Kalbacher, a state-certified teacher with Metropolitan’s education programs. “Learning about renewable energy and water conservation in a program like this often inspires a lifelong interest in science and math.” The hope is that some of the students will go on to careers in engineering, alternative energy development, resource management, environment sciences or other related fields, Kalbacher said. “Solar Cup offers valuable lessons to all students—requiring them to think creatively and critically to find practical solutions to challenges and then put those solutions to use, like they will have to in the real world,” she added. Over the past 15 years, more than 10,000 students have participated in Solar Cup. The program began in 2002 with eight teams and about 80 students. In the years since, it has grown into the nation’s largest solar-powered boat competition. Students began building their boats last fall and have worked with their sponsoring Metropolitan member and local water agencies to equip the boats with solar panels, batteries, electrical systems, drive trains, propellers and rudders. They’ve worked nights and weekends since to maximize their boats’ endurance, speed and mechanical and electrical efficiencies. Teams are put through a series of qualifying events by Metropolitan and a technical advisory team from Occidental College to ensure boats meet the program’s requirements and are safe and seaworthy. On Friday, May 19 the boats will be qualified and tested on Lake Skinner. The competition begins Saturday, May 20, when the teams face off in two 90-minute endurance heats around a 1.6-kilometer course and continues Sunday, May 21, with 200-meter sprint races in which the boats are powered by solar energy stored in batteries. Solar Cup culminates with an awards ceremony on Sunday afternoon. Trophies are awarded in veteran and rookie divisions for teams with the highest points, as well as to teams honored for “Hottest-Looking Boat,” teamwork and sportsmanship. Among the 43 teams in this year’s Solar Cup are two schools participating for the first time. They will compete in a rookie division. As part of the program, the teams also created compelling video and social media campaigns on the importance of water conservation. Teams produced either a 60-second, self-scripted conservation video or social media campaign under the theme, “Changing Climate, Lifelong Conservation.” In addition to the racing results, teams earn points from these public service messages, as well as technical inspections and completion of technical reports. The races are open to the public and easily visible from the lake shoreline. The event takes place from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. with free admission and parking. Lake Skinner is at 37701 Warren Road in the Temecula Valley community of Winchester in southwest Riverside County—about 10 miles northeast of the Rancho California Road exit off Interstate 15. Learn more about Solar Cup at mwdh2o.com and here. The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California is a state-established cooperative of 26 cities and water agencies serving nearly 19 million people in six counties. The district imports water from the Colorado River and Northern California to supplement local supplies, and helps its members to develop increased water conservation, recycling, storage and other resource-management programs.


SAN DIEGO--(BUSINESS WIRE)--American Water recently announced it has named Garry Hofer the Vice President of Operations of California American Water, effective immediately. Hofer replaces Rich Svindland, who was named the President of California American Water last February. As the vice president for Operations, Hofer will now lead all operations for California American Water including Water and Wastewater Treatment, Transmission, Distribution, Field Services, SCADA, Water Quality and Environmental Compliance, Customer Advocacy, and Metering. “We are pleased to have Garry take on this position for the company,” said Rich Svindland, the president of California American Water. “Throughout his years at California American Water, Garry has demonstrated his vast knowledge of water utility operations and his exceptional leadership skills. Garry has done an outstanding job as the Director for Southern California Operations these last five years and we look forward to seeing him continue to serve our customers well in his new role.” Hofer began his career at California American Water in 2008 as the External Affairs Manager for the Southern Division and later, the Operations Manager for the Los Angeles District. Hofer has served as the Director of Operations for the Southern California Division since 2012 where he was responsible for overseeing 70,000 service connections and helped provide high quality water services to approximately 180,000 residents in throughout the San Diego, Los Angeles and Ventura County districts. Hofer’s additional water utility experiences includes managing corporate communications, public and media relations at Southwest Water Company Utility Group and the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California. A member of American Water Works Association and the California Water Association, Hofer maintains chapter memberships with various organizations such as the Main San Gabriel Watermaster Board of Directors and Raymond Basin Board of Directors. Hofer is also the Former President for the Board of Directors with the Hurst Ranch Historical Center. Hofer received his Bachelors of Arts in Journalism from University of La Verne, attended Chapman College for graduate studies in Creative Writing. He holds Level II certifications for Water and Wastewater Treatment. California American Water, a subsidiary of American Water (NYSE: AWK), provides high-quality and reliable water and/or wastewater services to more than 660,000 people. With a history dating back to 1886, American Water is the largest and most geographically diverse U.S. publicly-traded water and wastewater utility company. The company employs more than 6,700 dedicated professionals who provide regulated and market-based drinking water, wastewater and other related services to an estimated 15 million people in 47 states and Ontario, Canada. More information can be found by visiting www.amwater.com.


News Article | April 26, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

PERRIS, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Five regional government bodies announced today the framework of an agreement that lays the groundwork for the long-term potential development of community recreational facilities surrounding Diamond Valley Lake. The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, Eastern Municipal Water District, city of Hemet, Valley-Wide Recreation and Park District and County of Riverside have presented the non-binding Memorandum of Intent (MOI) to their elected bodies. The MOI is a tool for planning and coordination purposes that does not financially or contractually obligate any of the parties. Owned and operated by Metropolitan, Diamond Valley Lake—located near Hemet in southwest Riverside County—is Southern California’s largest drinking water reservoir. Body contact activities are prohibited at the reservoir to ensure the safety of the region’s drinking water. “This agreement is pivotal toward ensuring that the respective agencies are coordinated so we may better accommodate future development opportunities of the area surrounding Diamond Valley Lake,” said Randy Record, chairman of Metropolitan’s Board of Directors and EMWD’s representative on the 38-member MWD board. “By having clearly defined responsibilities, we can ensure we act efficiently at the appropriate time that funding sources dictate the advancement of various projects.” For more than a year, the agencies have worked to develop a document that would outline the responsibilities of each agency as it relates to the recreational and facility improvements that may one day be developed in the area surrounding the lake. Much of that development will depend on outside funding sources, including private investors or grant funding. The MOI calls for an implementation committee to be formed within 90 days, with a representative of the five parties, along with at least one invited member from the Soboba Band of Luiseño Indians, California’s 28th Senate District, the local business community, the general public and the Western Science Center. All meetings will be conducted in accordance with the Brown Act to guarantee transparency and public trust. The five parties to the MOI will have varying degrees of responsibility and coordination with the expansion of the facilities and recreational opportunities surrounding the lake. Those responsibilities may include maintenance, security, operations, water supply, facility improvement or marketing. “Our agencies are committed to aggressively pursuing available funding opportunities and working with private developers to help expedite this process so that our region may continue to enhance what is already one of Southern California’s premier recreation destinations,” Hemet Mayor Linda Krupa said. Among the potential improvements to the area are trail extensions and interconnections between Salt Creek, Diamond Valley Lake and Lake Skinner; improving access roads to Diamond Valley Lake that may extend the facility’s operating hours; a recreational lagoon; camping and RV accommodations; expanded leisure spaces; and an expanded sports complex. “By proactively working to enhance recreational opportunities in this region, we are helping to further meet the needs of our residents and help promote the region as a world-class recreation destination,” said Riverside County Third District Supervisor Chuck Washington. “Doing so helps promote active, healthy lifestyles and economic development for the San Jacinto Valley and surrounding areas.” EMWD’s Board of Directors approved the MOI in March and the other entities are anticipated to bring the item before their respective governing bodies in April. Because it is a non-binding agreement with no financial commitments, some entities presented the item for informational purposes and it did not require a formal vote. “Along with our partner agencies, we have been able to develop a plan that will provide a unified vision for the future of recreation in this community,” Valley-Wide President Matt Duarte said. “Valley-Wide looks forward to continuing these collaborative efforts and doing its part to further enhance cost-effective recreational opportunities in the region.”


TEMECULA, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Long Beach’s McBride High School has taken an early lead in Metropolitan Water District’s 15th annual Solar Cup™, which launches today at Lake Skinner in southwest Riverside County. Heading into racing competition, McBride has the top preliminary score among the 43 teams from across Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino and San Diego counties that are competing in the three-day solar-powered boat competition. Teams will qualify on the water today before racing competition begins Saturday (May 20) and culminates Sunday (May 21). McBride’s early lead is based on preliminary scores earned in the months leading up to this weekend, with the team notching a perfect 360 points out of 360. Many of those points came from McBride’s public service message, which encouraged lifelong water conservation in Long Beach. Under Solar Cup’s public service message component, teams produce a short video or social media campaign encouraging people to conserve water, based on this year’s theme “Changing Climate, Lifelong Conservation.” In addition to the 250 points earned for its PSA, McBride earned perfect scores for two technical progress reports and meeting various deadlines. Closely trailing McBride is Cypress’s Oxford Academy in second place, with 353 points. Downey High School and last year’s Solar Cup winner, Riverside Poly High School, are tied for third place, each with 345 points. “These teams have been working hard afternoons, nights and weekends to make their boats as fast and reliable as possible, putting to use what they’ve learned in their math and science classes and in Metropolitan engineering and boat-building workshops,” said Solar Cup coordinator Julie Kalbacher, a state-certified teacher with Metropolitan’s education programs. “Now all of that hard work will be put to the test over the next few days.” “While it does get competitive, the best part is, everyone has a great time. The spirit of teamwork really carries the day, even between teams, especially when they are forced to troubleshoot unexpected problems that come up. And all of these kids walk away with a greater understanding of alternative energy development and the value of our water resources,” Kalbacher continued. More than 700 participating students will first be put through a series of qualifying events today to ensure their boats meet rules and are safe and seaworthy. The competition heats up Saturday when the single-seat, 16-foot boats outfitted with solar-collection panels compete in endurance races around a 1.6-kilometer course in the morning and afternoon. Sunday the boats’ solar panels are removed and their energy-storing capabilities are put to the test as they compete in 200-meter sprint races powered by solar energy stored in batteries. The races will be followed by an awards ceremony, with trophies awarded in veteran and rookie divisions for teams with the highest points, as well as to teams honored for “Hottest-Looking Boat,” teamwork and sportsmanship. The races are easily visible from the shore, and the event is open to the public from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. with free admission and parking. Lake Skinner is at 37701 Warren Road, Winchester, in the Temecula Valley of southwest Riverside County—about 10 miles northeast of the Rancho California Road exit off Interstate 15. Over the past 15 years, more than 10,000 students have participated in Solar Cup. The program began in 2002 with eight teams and about 80 students. In the years since, it has grown into the nation’s largest solar-powered boat competition. The educational competition allows students to apply their skills in math, physics, engineering and communications and learn more about Southern California’s water sources, conservation and alternative energy development. It has inspired future engineers, water resource managers and conservationists, and helped the region build the workforce needed to produce smart solutions to its environmental and water supply problems. Teams are divided into four regions—the Foothill, Central & Bay, Inland Empire and South Counties regions. Solar Cup also includes a rookie division for first-time teams. Learn more about Solar Cup at mwdh2o.com and here. Longer videos are also available for use here. Photos and video of this year’s event will be available upon request. The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California is a state-established cooperative of 26 cities and water agencies serving nearly 19 million people in six counties. The district imports water from the Colorado River and Northern California to supplement local supplies, and helps its members to develop increased water conservation, recycling, storage and other resource-management programs.


LAKE SKINNER, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Metropolitan Water District’s 15th annual Solar Cup™ concluded today with boats built and raced by students from Riverside Poly and Mira Costa high schools claiming the top awards at the competition, the largest student-based solar-powered boat race in the nation. The schools were among 43 teams competing from Metropolitan’s six-county, 5,200-square-mile service area, which includes Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, San Diego and Ventura counties. Solar Cup is a year-long program in which students build, equip and race 16-foot, single-seat boats powered only by the sun. The Solar Cup program allows students to apply their skills in math, physics, engineering and communications, while learning about Southern California’s water resources, resource management, conservation and alternative energy development. Riverside Poly High School, in Riverside, won first place in the veteran’s division, followed by Oxford Academy and Calabasas High School in second and third place overall. Mira Costa High School, in Manhattan Beach, took the top prize in the rookie division at the three-day competition at Metropolitan’s Lake Skinner in the Temecula Valley of southwestern Riverside County. “Solar Cup gives students a chance to really put to use skills they’ve learned in the classroom in a fun competition. And as much preparation as they put into engineering their boats leading up to this weekend’s races, most teams still face a challenge or two here, so they have to think on their feet, problem-solving as they go – just like in real life. Those are skills that will be immensely valuable to them as they move beyond the classroom and enter professional careers,” said Metropolitan Assistant General Manager Dee Zinke. On Friday, teams completed a qualifying event to ensure boats met rules and were safe and seaworthy. Saturday, the teams attached solar-collection panels to the boats for two, 90-minute, 1.6-kilometer endurance races. Today, the solar-collection panels were removed and boats used solar energy stored in batteries to speed down a 200-meter stretch. The 2017 Solar Cup program began last fall when Metropolitan’s member agencies announced their school sponsorships. Teams are sponsored by their local water agencies and other organizations to equip the crafts with solar panels, batteries, steering and related systems. Metropolitan provided teams with identical kits of marine-grade plywood to build the hull, and an advisory team from Occidental College provided technical support for the boats’ engineering and mechanics. While all teams must build a new boat and equip it, returning teams were allowed to use equipment from previous boats. “Solar Cup isn’t just about building and racing boats, we also give students the big picture about the value of alternative energy development, water resources and sustainability,” said Solar Cup coordinator Julie Kalbacher, a state-certified teacher with Metropolitan’s education programs. Following are the trophies and awards presented today. Complete Solar Cup scores will be posted on Metropolitan’s website, mwdh2o.com. You can also follow @mwdh2o on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook to see the results from this weekend’s races and stay abreast of other agency and industry news. Photos and video of this year’s event are available upon request and will be posted on the website in the coming days. Bart Bezyack Memorial Spirit of Solar Cup Trophy Sportsmanship Award: Norte Vista High School in Riverside (Western Municipal Water District, Riverside Public Utilities) for helping another team with equipment Teamwork Award: Los Osos High School in Rancho Cucamonga (Inland Empire Utilities Agency, Cucamonga Valley Water) for helping another team with equipment and advice The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California is a state-established cooperative of 26 cities and water agencies serving nearly 19 million people in six counties. The district imports water from the Colorado River and Northern California to supplement local supplies, and helps its members to develop increased water conservation, recycling, storage and other resource-management programs.


News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

Solar Cup began in 2002 with eight teams and about 80 students. In the 15 years since, it has grown into the nation’s largest solar-powered boat competition. Along the way, more than 10,000 young men and women have participated in Solar Cup competitions, where they’ve learned about water resource management, alternative energy development, and sustainability and been inspired to pursue careers in math, physics, engineering and environmental science. The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California is a state-established cooperative of 26 cities and water agencies serving nearly 19 million people in six counties. The district imports water from the Colorado River and Northern California to supplement local supplies, and helps its members to develop increased water conservation, recycling, storage and other resource-management programs.


LOS ANGELES--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Poised to put more water in storage in 2017 than any year in history, Metropolitan Water District’s Board of Directors today urged local agencies to continue water savings through voluntary conservation measures. A month after Gov. Jerry Brown declared an end to the statewide drought emergency, Metropolitan’s board approved the voluntary approach given the importance of maintaining lower levels of demands into the years ahead. Officially, a voluntary conservation approach is termed by Metropolitan a Water Supply Watch condition. “This level reflects the public’s remarkable water-saving response and our conservation and outreach programs prior to and during the five-year drought, which were critical in helping us sustain demand cutbacks,” said Metropolitan board Chairman Randy Record. “As our current advertising and outreach campaign says, the drought emergency may be over, but we all need to get in the lifelong habit of saving water,” he added. Water supply gains from significantly improved statewide hydrologic conditions were another reason for the board’s action. Last month, California broke the record for the wettest year ever in the northern Sierra, prompting the Department of Water Resources to increase its State Water Project allocation to 85 percent. Under the allocation, Metropolitan will have access to nearly 1.7 million acre-feet of water from the state project this year. Metropolitan General Manager Jeffrey Kightlinger said the district will maximize state project deliveries by putting as much as 1 million acre-feet of water or more in reserves this year. (An acre-foot is about 326,000 gallons, enough water to supply two typical Southland households for a year.) “Although 1 million acre-feet would be the largest single-year storage increase in Metropolitan’s history, it will not return regional reserves to pre-drought levels,” Kightlinger cautioned. “That’s why all of us should voluntarily continue to embrace our water-saving practices.” The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California is a state-established cooperative of 26 cities and water agencies serving nearly 19 million people in six counties. The district imports water from the Colorado River and Northern California to supplement local supplies, and helps its members to develop increased water conservation, recycling, storage and other resource-management programs.


News Article | February 17, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

Lake Oroville and its dam in Northern California are critical components in California's complex water-delivery system. Damage to spillways that are used to drop water levels in the lake and relieve pressure on the dam prompted evacuation orders covering nearly 200,000 people. Here's a look at Lake Oroville and its place in California's water system Lake Oroville is the starting point for California's State Water Project, which provides drinking water to 23 million of the state's 39 million people and irrigates 750,000 acres of farms. It is the largest reservoir in the system, which was built in the 1960s and early 1970s to carry rain and snowpack from the Sierra Nevada mountains to parts of the San Francisco Bay area, Central Valley and Southern California. Lake Oroville, completed in 1967, is a cornerstone of the system of 34 reservoirs, lakes and storage facilities, built and operated by California's Department of Water Resources. It feeds into the Feather River - about 70 miles north of Sacramento - as well as the Sacramento River and the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta. From there it travels south on the 444-mile California Aqueduct. Oroville's storage capacity of 3.5 million acre-feet of water is enough to supply urban California for up to six months, said Peter Gleick, president emeritus of the Pacific Institute, a water research organization based in Oakland, California. "The risk of losing Oroville is very, very low" he said. "The consequences would be catastrophic." When reservoirs get too full, their operators release extra water down long channels, or spillways, designed to carry it downstream in a safe, controlled way. Oroville Dam has a main concrete spillway that normally is used to release floodwaters into the Feather River downstream. A second spillway mainly made of earth serves as an emergency backup. It also was supposed to be able to handle high flows from the dam, but it had never been used before Saturday. The force of water siphoned from the lake has damaged both spillways. After five years of drought, a wet winter has strained the system at Lake Oroville, which is receiving runoff from melting snow in the Sierra Nevada as well as from the latest in a series of heavy storms. Dam operators noticed chunks of concrete in the main spillway on Feb. 7. When workers stopped releasing water to investigate, they found that concrete patches the size of football fields had washed out of the channel. With the reservoir nearing the top of the 770-foot-high dam, dam operators were forced to keep using the main spillway despite increasing damage to it from the rushing water. The dam reached capacity Saturday, sending water surging over the second, emergency spillway. Operators on Sunday noticed water was gouging a hole in the earthen emergency spillway as well. Fearing that the emergency spillway could fail and send torrents of water rushing downstream uncontrolled, authorities ordered the evacuation Sunday evening. The Central Valley Project, operated by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, irrigates more than 3 million acres of farms and provides enough drinking water for more than 1 million people. The system of 22 reservoirs was built from 1937 to the 1950s, extending about 400 miles from the Cascade Mountains near Redding to the Tehachapi Mountains near Bakersfield. It includes Shasta Lake, the only reservoir in California that's larger than Oroville. The Colorado River supplies 19 million urban dwellers in Southern California through a 242-mile aqueduct from Lake Havasu, Arizona, to the state's coastal regions that was completed by Metropolitan Water District of Southern California in 1941. The Colorado also farms California's Imperial Valley - a major source of the nation's winter vegetables - through the 80-mile All-American Canal that hugs the state's border with Mexico. Other significant pieces of the state system include the Los Angeles Aqueduct, which carries water from Mono Lake to the city of Los Angeles, and the Hetch Hetchy reservoir in Yosemite National Park, which supplies the San Francisco Bay area. You Might Also Like

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