Los Angeles, CA, United States

The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California is the largest supplier of treated water in the US. The name is usually shortened to the "Metropolitan Water District", "the Met", or simply "MWD". It is a cooperative of 14 cities and 12 municipal water districts that indirectly provides water to 18 million people in its 5,200-square-mile service area. It was created by an act of the California Legislature in 1928, primarily to build and operate the Colorado River Aqueduct. MWD became the first contractor to the State Water Project in 1960.It includes parts of Los Angeles, Orange, San Diego, Riverside, San Bernardino and Ventura counties. The district covers primarily the coastal and most heavily populated portions of Southern California; however large portions of San Diego, San Bernardino and Riverside counties are located outside of its service area.The MWD headquarters is located at 700 North Alameda Street in downtown Los Angeles, adjacent to Union Station. Wikipedia.


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The post-drought good news continued Friday as the State Water Project announced that it was boosting deliveries to the highest levels in 11 years. Most agencies, including the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, will get 85% of the amount they request. Water districts north of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta will get 100%. Earlier this week, the federal Central Valley Project, which provides irrigation water to valley growers, said all of its contractors will get their full contract supply for the first time since 2006. The increases came the same week that Northern California broke its 1983 precipitation record. And the April 1 state snowpack, a key water supply index, was the seventh heaviest on record. The 85% allocation may not be the last word. “We’re hopeful we’ll be able to increase deliveries even more as we monitor conditions,” said Bill Croyle, acting director of the Department of Water Resources, which operates the state project. Damage to the spillways at the state project’s primary reservoir, Lake Oroville, figures into the allocation because officials have to carefully manage lake levels and releases as they embark on repairs. Earlier this week Croyle said his department probably would not make a final allocation call until late May or early June. The San Luis Reservoir, where the federal and state projects park supplies destined for Southern California and San Joaquin growers, filled earlier this spring for the first time in years. That is allowing Metropolitan, the state project’s biggest customer, to rapidly rebuild its depleted regional reserves with deliveries from Northern California. “This could end up being the highest increase in regional storage we’ve ever seen,” Deven Upadhyay, the agency’s water resource manager, said last month.


News Article | April 26, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

PERRIS, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Five regional government bodies announced today the framework of an agreement that lays the groundwork for the long-term potential development of community recreational facilities surrounding Diamond Valley Lake. The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, Eastern Municipal Water District, city of Hemet, Valley-Wide Recreation and Park District and County of Riverside have presented the non-binding Memorandum of Intent (MOI) to their elected bodies. The MOI is a tool for planning and coordination purposes that does not financially or contractually obligate any of the parties. Owned and operated by Metropolitan, Diamond Valley Lake—located near Hemet in southwest Riverside County—is Southern California’s largest drinking water reservoir. Body contact activities are prohibited at the reservoir to ensure the safety of the region’s drinking water. “This agreement is pivotal toward ensuring that the respective agencies are coordinated so we may better accommodate future development opportunities of the area surrounding Diamond Valley Lake,” said Randy Record, chairman of Metropolitan’s Board of Directors and EMWD’s representative on the 38-member MWD board. “By having clearly defined responsibilities, we can ensure we act efficiently at the appropriate time that funding sources dictate the advancement of various projects.” For more than a year, the agencies have worked to develop a document that would outline the responsibilities of each agency as it relates to the recreational and facility improvements that may one day be developed in the area surrounding the lake. Much of that development will depend on outside funding sources, including private investors or grant funding. The MOI calls for an implementation committee to be formed within 90 days, with a representative of the five parties, along with at least one invited member from the Soboba Band of Luiseño Indians, California’s 28th Senate District, the local business community, the general public and the Western Science Center. All meetings will be conducted in accordance with the Brown Act to guarantee transparency and public trust. The five parties to the MOI will have varying degrees of responsibility and coordination with the expansion of the facilities and recreational opportunities surrounding the lake. Those responsibilities may include maintenance, security, operations, water supply, facility improvement or marketing. “Our agencies are committed to aggressively pursuing available funding opportunities and working with private developers to help expedite this process so that our region may continue to enhance what is already one of Southern California’s premier recreation destinations,” Hemet Mayor Linda Krupa said. Among the potential improvements to the area are trail extensions and interconnections between Salt Creek, Diamond Valley Lake and Lake Skinner; improving access roads to Diamond Valley Lake that may extend the facility’s operating hours; a recreational lagoon; camping and RV accommodations; expanded leisure spaces; and an expanded sports complex. “By proactively working to enhance recreational opportunities in this region, we are helping to further meet the needs of our residents and help promote the region as a world-class recreation destination,” said Riverside County Third District Supervisor Chuck Washington. “Doing so helps promote active, healthy lifestyles and economic development for the San Jacinto Valley and surrounding areas.” EMWD’s Board of Directors approved the MOI in March and the other entities are anticipated to bring the item before their respective governing bodies in April. Because it is a non-binding agreement with no financial commitments, some entities presented the item for informational purposes and it did not require a formal vote. “Along with our partner agencies, we have been able to develop a plan that will provide a unified vision for the future of recreation in this community,” Valley-Wide President Matt Duarte said. “Valley-Wide looks forward to continuing these collaborative efforts and doing its part to further enhance cost-effective recreational opportunities in the region.”


News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

Metropolitan’s General Manager Jeffrey Kightlinger and Matt Blashaw, host of HGTV’s Yard Crashers, will kick off the event at the 8:30 a.m. welcoming ceremonies. Seminar guest speakers include Christy Wilhelmi, host of the website Gardenerd; Eli Kaufman of the non-profit River LA; and Mark Daniel and Mark Hall of the Greater Los Angeles County Vector Control District. Exhibitors include representatives from conservation groups, sustainable businesses and water agencies. In addition, students from more than a dozen colleges and trade schools will present innovative approaches to sustainability in an ECO Innovators’ Showcase. For the past decade, the Spring Green Expo has showcased environmentally friendly practices, programs, products and services that save water and promote greener homes and businesses. This year’s seminar topics include “Water Conservation Challenges in Southern California,” “Spring Garden Planning,” and “Reclaiming our Connection to the LA River.” The expo also celebrates Water Awareness Month in May with a water-themed photo exhibit. The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California is a state-established cooperative of 26 cities and water agencies serving nearly 19 million people in six counties. The district imports water from the Colorado River and Northern California to supplement local supplies, and helps its members to develop increased water conservation, recycling, storage and other resource-management programs.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

LOS ANGELES--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Three new members representing the Central Basin Municipal Water District and the city of Glendale were seated yesterday on the board of directors of the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California. Bell Gardens City Councilmember Pedro Aceituno and real estate broker Phillip D. Hawkins will serve as Central Basin’s representatives on Metropolitan’s 38-member board, joining Glendale City Councilmember Zareh Sinanyan as the city’s representative. Aceituno replaces Leticia Vásquez-Wilson, who had served on the Metropolitan board since February 2015 and previously from February 2013 to July 2014. Hawkins returns to Metropolitan’s board—where he served from July 2014 to February 2015 and from June 2003 to August 2009. He succeeds Robert Apodaca, who represented Central Basin since February 2013 as well as from June 2003 to August 2009. Sinanyan follows Laura Friedman, who had represented the city since February 2009. First elected to the Bell Garden City Council in 1999, Aceituno is the city’s longest-serving elected official. He was elected to the Central Basin board last November, representing Bell Gardens, Downey, Montebello, Pico Rivera, West Whittier-Los Nietos and unincorporated areas of Los Angeles County. Aceituno was recognized by Central Basin in 2007 for his work in making Bell Gardens the first city in the region to embrace a city-wide water conservation program. He helped transform the city into a "California Friendly City" model by integrating key water-saving measures at public parks and facilities. A life-long Bell Gardens resident, Aceituno is the city’s representative to the Sanitation Districts of Los Angeles County, Southeast Area Animal Control Authority, Southern California Association of Governments, Greater Los Angeles County Vector Control District, Eco-Rapid Transit and the Gateway Cities Council of Governments. Re-elected to his fifth term on Central Basin’s board last November, Hawkins currently serves as board president. His Central Basin district consists of the cities of Artesia, Bellflower, Cerritos, Hawaiian Gardens, Lakewood, Paramount and Signal Hill. A real estate broker since 1977, Hawkins has opened several businesses, including Realty World in Bellflower, Herbert Hawkins Realty, also in Bellflower, Century 21 in Norwalk and the Dean Company. Hawkins, a Cerritos resident, was elected to the California Assembly in 1994, representing the 56th Assembly District until 1996. During his Assembly term, he was chairman of the Committee on Housing and Community Development and vice chair of the Committee on Budget, and served as a member of various other committees. An attorney with his own Glendale law practice, Sinanyan was elected to the City Council in April 2013 and served as mayor from April 2014 to April 2015. The founding chair of the Glendale Economic Development Corp., he currently serves as Glendale Housing Authority chair, secretary of the Burbank/Glendale/Pasadena Airport Authority, and vice chair of the Eco-Rapid Transit Authority. Born in formerly Soviet Armenia, Sinanyan earned his bachelor’s degrees in political science and history at UCLA and his juris doctorate from the University of Southern California Law School. While in law school, Sinanyan interned for Justice Earl Johnson of the California Court of Appeal, where he helped draft appellate opinions for a number of cases ranging from criminal to civil matters. He also clerked and worked for the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission’s Enforcement Division. Note to editors: Digital photographs of the new Metropolitan directors are available upon request. The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California is a state-established cooperative of 26 cities and water agencies serving nearly 19 million people in six counties. The district imports water from the Colorado River and Northern California to supplement local supplies, and helps its members to develop increased water conservation, recycling, storage and other resource-management programs.


ARCADIA, CA--(Marketwired - February 07, 2017) - SAFNA Engineering and Consulting (SAFNA) today announced the expansion of its business of engineering and consulting services in infrastructure engineering and program management. To support the company's broader market focus, SAFNA has hired industry veteran Reymundo Trejo, PE as its new Executive Director and Chief Engineer. Mr. Trejo brings a broad range of experience in the municipal infrastructure projects business to his new role at SAFNA. Over the course of more than 20 years in both private and public sector organizations, Trejo has overseen advanced water treatment, conveyance infrastructure, waste water conveyance, and regional-scale recycled water programs valued at nearly $1B. He brings extensive experience in the planning, operations, budgeting, grant funding, and staffing of large infrastructure projects, and is a proven manager of complex and innovative programs. Mr. Trejo currently serves on the California-Nevada American Water Works Association (AWWA) Recycled Water and Desalination Committees. He holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Civil Environmental Engineering from the University of Southern California, and is a professionally-registered civil engineer. Headquartered in Arcadia, CA, SAFNA has already been involved with the engineering and design of complex infrastructure projects, including in their list of customers the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, the Irvine Ranch Water District, the city of Simi Valley, and Santa Barbara County. Most notably, SAFNA worked on the Carlsbad Desalination Project for the San Diego County Water Authority. This $1B project provides 50 million gallons of water per day to approximately 300,000 residents in San Diego. For the Carlsbad project, SAFNA designed an innovative pre-treatment filtration vessel that extends the life of the RO (reverse osmosis) equipment and meets NSF 61 requirements. "We are extremely fortunate to have someone with Rey's talents and experience join our SAFNA team," said Mr. Jorge Ramirez, President and CEO. "We are confident that with Mr. Trejo's extensive experience in municipality project management, SAFNA will be able to add to our portfolio of successfully-completed private and public infrastructure projects." SAFNA offers a wide range of professional engineering services and products. The company provides engineering and consulting services supporting program management, engineering design, and implementation of infrastructure projects. SAFNA is an industry leader in the product design and fabrication of custom carbon and stainless steel storage tanks, pressure vessels, and filter housings, manufactured in a National Board-Certified facility located in San Dimas, California. SAFNA has successfully engineered, designed, and constructed a number of innovative systems for municipality projects including water treatment, landfill, and desalination applications. For more information, please visit http://www.safna.com.


News Article | February 24, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

LOS ANGELES--(BUSINESS WIRE)--After five years of drought, the green hills surrounding Diamond Valley Lake will once again come alive with the bright oranges, blues, purples and reds of the region’s native wildflowers. The display of colors will be easily accessible to visitors of the lake’s seasonal wildflower trail, which opens to the public today (Feb. 24), and will remain open daily until the blooms fade in late spring. “This winter’s impressive rainfall has not only brought some much-needed relief to the state’s record drought, it has brought life back to the hills surrounding Diamond Valley Lake,” said Jeff Kightlinger, general manager of the Metropolitan Water District, which owns and operates the 4,500-surface-acre lake near Hemet in southwest Riverside County. “It has been too long since we have been treated to the natural brilliance of these hillsides ablaze with color,” Kightlinger added. The wildflower bloom has already started and is expected to peak in mid- to late-March, when the hillsides will be a carpet of color, said wildlife biologist Bill Wagner. “We’ve had a limited bloom the past few years scattered around the lake. This year is going to be spectacular, with broad fields of flowers covering the hillsides,” he said. “Because the hillsides are so saturated due to the rain this year, I think the bloom could go well into late spring.” In addition to fields of orange California poppies—the state flower—visitors can expect to see blue royal lupines, purple canterbury bells, yellow ranchers fiddleneck, white popcorn flowers, and pink red maids, among other wildflowers. The best time to see poppies in blooms is from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., as they need full sun. The wildflower trail—part of the Southwestern Riverside County Multi-Species Reserve—is a 1.3-mile loop extending from the Lakeview Trail. The trail is rated as an easy-to-moderate hike with some rugged terrain and will be open from sunrise to sunset. “Visitors who hike to the top of the trail peak will also get another beautiful sight—tons of butterflies,” Wagner said. The trailhead is accessible via the lake’s East Marina, entered at Domenigoni and Searl parkways in Hemet. Parking is $7 and there is a $2-per-person Lakeview Trail fee that includes a map of the wildflower trail and a wildflower guide. Two other trails are open to the public year-round and also afford good views of the blooming flowers—the 26.1-mile Lakeview hiking and bicycling trail that circles the 4.5-mile-long lake and the 5.9-mile North Hills trail for equestrians and hikers. Another viewing option is to rent one of the lake’s bass or pontoon boats, bring fishing poles and lunch, and enjoy the 360-degree views from the lake itself. Boat rental and fishing information is at dvlake.com. In addition, Diamond Valley Lake features a Visitor Center and the Western Science Center, both on Searl Parkway near the Domenigoni Parkway entrance. Information on California Friendly™ native plants and water-saving tips are at bewaterwise.com. For more information about the seasonal wildflower trail, call 1-800-590-LAKE or 961-926-7201. Pets are not allowed on the trails or in the marina. The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California is a state-established cooperative of 26 cities and water agencies serving nearly 19 million people in six counties. The district imports water from the Colorado River and Northern California to supplement local supplies, and helps its members to develop increased water conservation, recycling, storage and other resource-management programs.


News Article | February 17, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

Lake Oroville and its dam in Northern California are critical components in California's complex water-delivery system. Damage to spillways that are used to drop water levels in the lake and relieve pressure on the dam prompted evacuation orders covering nearly 200,000 people. Here's a look at Lake Oroville and its place in California's water system Lake Oroville is the starting point for California's State Water Project, which provides drinking water to 23 million of the state's 39 million people and irrigates 750,000 acres of farms. It is the largest reservoir in the system, which was built in the 1960s and early 1970s to carry rain and snowpack from the Sierra Nevada mountains to parts of the San Francisco Bay area, Central Valley and Southern California. Lake Oroville, completed in 1967, is a cornerstone of the system of 34 reservoirs, lakes and storage facilities, built and operated by California's Department of Water Resources. It feeds into the Feather River - about 70 miles north of Sacramento - as well as the Sacramento River and the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta. From there it travels south on the 444-mile California Aqueduct. Oroville's storage capacity of 3.5 million acre-feet of water is enough to supply urban California for up to six months, said Peter Gleick, president emeritus of the Pacific Institute, a water research organization based in Oakland, California. "The risk of losing Oroville is very, very low" he said. "The consequences would be catastrophic." When reservoirs get too full, their operators release extra water down long channels, or spillways, designed to carry it downstream in a safe, controlled way. Oroville Dam has a main concrete spillway that normally is used to release floodwaters into the Feather River downstream. A second spillway mainly made of earth serves as an emergency backup. It also was supposed to be able to handle high flows from the dam, but it had never been used before Saturday. The force of water siphoned from the lake has damaged both spillways. After five years of drought, a wet winter has strained the system at Lake Oroville, which is receiving runoff from melting snow in the Sierra Nevada as well as from the latest in a series of heavy storms. Dam operators noticed chunks of concrete in the main spillway on Feb. 7. When workers stopped releasing water to investigate, they found that concrete patches the size of football fields had washed out of the channel. With the reservoir nearing the top of the 770-foot-high dam, dam operators were forced to keep using the main spillway despite increasing damage to it from the rushing water. The dam reached capacity Saturday, sending water surging over the second, emergency spillway. Operators on Sunday noticed water was gouging a hole in the earthen emergency spillway as well. Fearing that the emergency spillway could fail and send torrents of water rushing downstream uncontrolled, authorities ordered the evacuation Sunday evening. The Central Valley Project, operated by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, irrigates more than 3 million acres of farms and provides enough drinking water for more than 1 million people. The system of 22 reservoirs was built from 1937 to the 1950s, extending about 400 miles from the Cascade Mountains near Redding to the Tehachapi Mountains near Bakersfield. It includes Shasta Lake, the only reservoir in California that's larger than Oroville. The Colorado River supplies 19 million urban dwellers in Southern California through a 242-mile aqueduct from Lake Havasu, Arizona, to the state's coastal regions that was completed by Metropolitan Water District of Southern California in 1941. The Colorado also farms California's Imperial Valley - a major source of the nation's winter vegetables - through the 80-mile All-American Canal that hugs the state's border with Mexico. Other significant pieces of the state system include the Los Angeles Aqueduct, which carries water from Mono Lake to the city of Los Angeles, and the Hetch Hetchy reservoir in Yosemite National Park, which supplies the San Francisco Bay area. You Might Also Like


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

The water from the Feather River flows through Oroville, Calif., Monday, Feb. 13, 2017. Water levels at Lake Oroville, which feeds the river are continuing to drop, stopping water from spilling over the spillway. Thousands of Northern California residents were asked to evacuate their homes Sunday evening after authorities warned the emergency spillway of the Oroville Dam could fail at any time unleashing uncontrolled flood waters on towns below. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli) Environmental activists and local government officials warned more than a decade ago about the risk of catastrophic flooding below a major Northern California dam — the very scenario that threatened to unfold over the weekend, prompting evacuation orders for nearly 200,000 people. State and federal regulators dismissed those fears at the time, saying they were confident the hillside that helps hold back hundreds of billions of gallons of water was stable and did not need to be reinforced with concrete. That decision has come under scrutiny now that the hillside — or emergency spillway, as officials call it — has been put to its first test in the Oroville Dam's nearly 50-year history. Over the weekend, water from the storm-swollen lake behind the dam spilled down the unpaved slope for 38 hours, eroding it enough that authorities feared a huge breach could open and send a 30-foot-high surge of water down the Feather River below, devastating thousands of homes. The danger eased Monday as the water level behind the dam dropped, but more rain was in the forecast, and residents as far as several dozen miles downriver in Yuba City were advised to stay out of their homes because of flood danger. At 770-feet, Oroville Dam is the nation's tallest. It stands about 70 miles north of Sacramento in the foothills of the northern Sierra Nevada. In 2005, at the start of the dam's still-unfinished relicensing process, environmental groups asked federal regulators to require that the California Department of Water Resources "armor" the hillside — or reinforce it, typically with concrete or boulders — to prevent potentially catastrophic erosion from water escaping when the reservoir was cresting over full capacity. The groups said rocks and other debris could be swept into the river, damaging highway bridges and power plants downstream. In a worst case, they warned, a major breach would unleash floods that could take lives and destroy property. Also in 2005, officials with Sutter County, which the Feather River runs through several dozen miles downstream of the dam, asked federal regulators to "investigate the adequacy and structural integrity" of the hillside and how it would hold during "extreme flood releases." "I think that the warning that was given should have been taken with the utmost seriousness," said Bob Wright, an attorney at Friends of the River, which raised the issue along with the Sierra Club and South Yuba River Citizens League. Bill Croyle, acting head of the Department of Water Resources, refused to comment on the 2005 concerns, saying he was not familiar with them and would need to research the matter. Speaking late Monday at the state's emergency-operations center in Sacramento, Gov. Jerry Brown also said he had not known of the warnings about the emergency spillway, and said public officials depend on the recommendations of their engineers. "They tell us what we need and we do it," Brown said. "But we live in a world of risk," Brown added. "Stuff happens and we respond." Last week, officials tried to relieve pressure on the dam by releasing a torrent of water through an adjacent, concrete-lined primary channel designed to handle heavy flows. When the deluge gouged out hundreds of feet of the concrete bottom, dam managers eased off those controlled releases. Water then began spilling down the hillside. Back when environmentalists and local officials were raising their concerns, the water resources department dismissed the need to fortify the hillside, insisting it would not be in danger if water cascaded down it. The hillside was designed to handle the "probable maximum flood," and annual dam inspections include a review of the spillway's structural integrity, according to a May 2006 filing by the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California and other water agencies in the state that could have been in line to help pay for the upgrades to the dam. The cost of reinforcing the hillside was not immediately clear. In the filing, the water agencies told federal regulators that environmentalists and local officials did not show that the emergency spillway posed a public risk. As part of the relicensing application, state water resources department officials wrote in a final environmental impact report dated June 2008 that no "significant concerns" about the hillside's stability had been raised in any government or independent review.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.npr.org

With More Rain Forecast, Crews Work To Reinforce Oroville Dam In California, construction crews are trying to lower the level of Lake Oroville and repair emergency spillways at the Oroville Dam, about 75 miles north of Sacramento, to prevent catastrophic flooding downstream. A secondary spillway was opened Monday after the main spillway, which is supposed to safely release water when the lake level is too high, had developed a huge hole, as we reported. Rain is forecast for later this week in Northern California, and nearly 200,000 people who live downstream have been evacuated from the area. As NPR's Richard Gonzalez reported, "The good news is that the water level in the dam is falling and repair crews have been able to drop heavy rocks in key spots of the emergency spillway to prevent further erosion." For those who were evacuated, hotels in the region were filled to capacity on Tuesday and "evacuation centers are straining to keep up with the demand for shelter," Richard said. FEMA Acting Regional Administrator Ahsha Tribble said the agency is providing support to evacuated people, Ben Bradford of Capital Public Radio reported. "We are already moving commodities, and commodities being cots, blankets and water, given the number of people that were actually evacuated last night," Tribble said. "Officials say a new series of storms coming by Thursday prevents them from saying how long the evacuation could last," Richard reported. The Los Angeles Times published this diagram of what that catastrophic erosion could look like. "Meanwhile, local reports are emerging that environmental groups raised concerns about the dam's emergency spillway decades ago," Richard reported. The Times reported that the the emergency spillways were damaged by far less water than the maximum flow they are supposed to handle: "Earth and weak rock near the top of the spillway started to erode when peak flows were 12,600 cubic feet per second, compared with the designed capacity of 450,000 cubic feet per second, according to the Department of Water Resources. ... Bill Croyle, the acting director of the Department of Water Resources, said Monday that he was 'not sure anything went wrong. This was a new, never-happened-before event.' "But during 2005 relicensing proceedings for Oroville Dam, several environmental groups argued that substantial erosion would occur on the hillside in the event of a significant emergency spill. In a filing, they asked the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to order the state to 'to armor or otherwise reconstruct the ungated spillway.' "State Water Project contractors, including the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, were involved in the relicensing. MWD General Manager Jeffrey Kightlinger said Monday his agency deferred to the state and federal agencies on the matter." At 770 feet, the Oroville Dam is the tallest in the U.S. Although the structure hasn't suffered a catastrophic failure, the excess water dumped by a series of California storms and released through the spillways has nonetheless inundated communities in and around Oroville. Reporter Paige St. John of the Times tweeted a photo of a drowned cemetery in the town of Marysville downstream of the dam. An aerial photo shared by the Long Beach Fire Department, which was called in from the southern part of the state to assist local authorities, showed water carving channels through the hills downstream of the dam, carrying mud and debris with it.


The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California hosts a technical conference on the findings of 13 studies and pilot projects that address obstacles to the future production of local stormwater capture, seawater desalination, recycling and groundwater recovery. Thursday, Feb. 23, from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

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