Box Elder, CO, United States

Metropolitan State University of Denver

www.msudenver.edu
Box Elder, CO, United States

The Metropolitan State University of Denver is a public university located in Denver, in the U.S. state of Colorado. As of 2009, the institution had the second-largest enrollment of undergraduates of any college in Colorado. With 56 majors and 82 minors, the college is noted for a wide array of liberal arts and science programs as well as teacher education, business, aviation, and criminal justice programs.In fall 2010, the university began offering master's programs in teacher education and accounting, with social work to begin in fall 2011. The college is noted for its fine athletic programs: Metro State's women's soccer team won the Division II National Championship in 2004 and 2006; the men's basketball team won the Division II National Championship in 2000 and 2002. Metro State is located on the Auraria Campus, along with the University of Colorado Denver and the Community College of Denver, in downtown Denver, adjacent to Speer Boulevard and Colfax Avenue. Metro State has an enrollment of over 23,000 students.On April 18, 2012, Metro State achieved university status. Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper approved the changing of the name of Metropolitan State College of Denver to Metropolitan State University of Denver, effective July 2012. Wikipedia.

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News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

LearnHowToBecome.org, a leading resource provider for higher education and career information, has released its list of the best colleges and universities in Colorado for 2017. 20 four-year schools made the list, with University of Denver, Regis University, Colorado School of Mines, University of Colorado—Colorado Springs and Colorado Colleges coming in with the highest scores. Of the 15 two-year schools that were also included, Aims Community College, Colorado Northwestern Community College, Trinidad State Junior College, Front Range Community College and Red Rocks Community College were the top five schools. A full list of schools is included below. “These schools have shown a commitment to preparing their students for success in college and beyond, with numbers to prove it,” said Wes Ricketts, senior vice president of LearnHowToBecome.org. “We measure data from each school, but also dig deeper into the success of alumni after college to find which colleges in Colorado truly are the best for students.” To be included on the “Best Colleges in Colorado” list, schools must be regionally accredited, not-for-profit institutions. Each college is also scored on additional data points including the number of career and academic resources, annual alumni earnings 10 years after entering college, financial aid availability, graduation rates and student/teacher ratios. Complete details on each college, their individual scores and the data and methodology used to determine the LearnHowToBecome.org “Best Colleges in Colorado” list, visit: Colorado’s Best Four-Year Colleges for 2017 include: Adams State University Colorado Christian University Colorado College Colorado Mesa University Colorado School of Mines Colorado State University-Fort Collins Colorado State University-Global Campus Colorado State University-Pueblo Fort Lewis College Johnson & Wales University-Denver Metropolitan State University of Denver Naropa University Regis University United States Air Force Academy University of Colorado Boulder University of Colorado Colorado Springs University of Colorado Denver University of Denver University of Northern Colorado Western State Colorado University Colorado’s Best Two-Year Colleges for 2017 include: Aims Community College Arapahoe Community College Colorado Northwestern Community College Community College of Aurora Community College of Denver Front Range Community College Lamar Community College Morgan Community College Northeastern Junior College Otero Junior College Pickens Technical College Pikes Peak Community College Pueblo Community College Red Rocks Community College Trinidad State Junior College ### About Us: LearnHowtoBecome.org was founded in 2013 to provide data and expert driven information about employment opportunities and the education needed to land the perfect career. Our materials cover a wide range of professions, industries and degree programs, and are designed for people who want to choose, change or advance their careers. We also provide helpful resources and guides that address social issues, financial aid and other special interest in higher education. Information from LearnHowtoBecome.org has proudly been featured by more than 700 educational institutions.


News Article | May 24, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

FILE- In this file photo provided by Donna Basden, a man is escorted off an American Airlines flight after it landed in Honolulu, Friday, May 19, 2017. Court records say the man who caused a disturbance on a flight from Los Angeles to Honolulu had no luggage other than a laptop and needed a wheelchair to board the plane because he appeared to be under the influence of drugs or alcohol.(Donna Basden via AP, File) LOS ANGELES (AP) — A man acted strangely long before he caused a disturbance on a plane that prompted fighter jets to accompany it to Hawaii, but a lack of communication and an airline's hesitancy to be caught on video booting a passenger could have played a role in allowing him to fly, experts say. Anil Uskanli, 25, of Turkey, had purchased a ticket at an airline counter in the middle of the night with no luggage and had been arrested after opening a door to a restricted airfield at Los Angeles International Airport. Airport police did not notify the airline, but they said it isn't common practice. After bizarre behavior on board Friday, including trying to get to the front of the jet, he was arrested by FBI agents and charged with interfering with a flight crew. A federal judge on Monday ordered him to undergo a mental competency evaluation, which Uskanli's attorney said he requested based on conversations with his client that he would not detail. The first alarm should have been Uskanli buying his ticket around midnight with no bags other than a laptop, a phone and items in his pocket, said Doron Pely, a director at TAL Global, an international security consulting firm focusing on aviation security. "Right there, that's enough red flags to really look into this guy with curiosity," Pely said. "He had trouble written all over him." But Uskanli went through a security screening without raising suspicion and only drew the attention when he opened a door leading to an airfield ramp around 2:45 a.m. Airport police said he smelled of alcohol but was not intoxicated enough to be charged with public drunkenness, so he was given a summons to appear in court and released. Police said officers confiscated his boarding pass and walked him to a public area of the airport. He got another boarding pass and went through security again. It isn't uncommon for people to open doors to restricted areas, airport police spokesman Rob Pedregon said, and Uskanli said he was looking for food when he was stopped by officers. "Had it not been serious, it would have been comical," Pely said. "How many times do passengers go back to the check-in counter and say, 'Police confiscated my boarding pass. Can you please reissue a boarding pass for me?'" Uskanli went to a different airport terminal, requested a wheelchair and was brought to the gate, American Airlines spokesman Ross Feinstein said. Flight attendants helped Uskanli at the door of the plane, authorities said. Before takeoff, he sat in first-class and had to be asked several times to move to his economy seat, according to a criminal complaint. "This is a situation where red flags were not accumulating properly because they were not transferred," Pely said. "If you see one red flag, you may let it go, but if you see three red flags and you let it go, you should be let go." Airline employees may have been worried about preventing Uskanli from flying because of recent viral videos of flight crews ejecting passengers and may have been more tolerant of his behavior because they didn't know about his airport arrest, he said. During the six-hour flight, Uskanli had his head swathed in a blanket and passengers said he pounded on walls after someone opened the restroom door he had left unlocked. He tried to get to the front of the plane, and a flight attendant used a drink cart to block Uskanli. He placed his laptop on the cart, and flight attendants feared it might contain explosives. That prompted the captain to initiate bomb-threat procedures, and fighter jets escorted the plane to Honolulu. The secretary of Homeland Security was briefed. Police, TSA and the airline should have been communicating more efficiently, said Richard Bloom, a security expert at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. "The end result was an incredible cost. If you add up the delays and the jet scrambling, etc., a lot of money was expended on him, a lot of emotions, a lot of people felt uncomfortable," Pely said. Uskanli's urine test revealed the presence benzodiazepine, a tranquilizer, and a field sobriety test indicated possible use of stimulants or cannabis, authorities said. Jeffrey Price, an aviation security professor at Metropolitan State University of Denver, said the recent spate of online videos showing airlines mistreating customers may have played a role, making airline employees less likely to confront a passenger or eject Uskanli from the plane. "There is probably some hesitancy, a little more tolerance even, of passenger behavior," he said. "Nobody wants to be the next YouTube star." Associated Press writer Jennifer Sinco Kelleher in Honolulu and AP Airlines Writer David Koenig in Dallas contributed to this report. This story has been corrected to show that Pely's first name is Doron, not Doren.


News Article | May 12, 2017
Site: hosted2.ap.org

US prepares to ban laptops on flights from Europe (AP) — The U.S. is expected to broaden its ban on in-flight laptops and tablets to include planes from the European Union, a move that would create logistical chaos on the world's busiest corridor of air travel. Alarmed at the proposal, which airline officials say is merely a matter of timing, European governments held urgent talks on Friday with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. The ban would affect trans-Atlantic routes that carry as many as 65 million people a year on over 400 daily flights, many of them business travelers who rely on their electronics to work during the flight. The ban would dwarf in size the current one, which was put in place in March and affects about 50 flights per day from 10 cities, mostly in the Middle East. Chief among the concerns are whether any new threat prompted the proposal and the relative safety of keeping in the cargo area a large number of electronics with lithium batteries, which have been known to catch fire. American officials were invited to Brussels next week to discuss the proposed ban, the EU said. European Commission spokeswoman Anna-Kaisa Itkonen said the EU had no new information about a specific security concern. U.S. officials have said the decision in March to bar laptops and tablets from the cabins of some international flights wasn't based on any specific threat but on longstanding concerns about extremists targeting jetliners. Experts say a bomb in the cabin would be easier to make and require less explosive force than one in the cargo hold. Baggage in cargo usually goes through a more sophisticated screening process than carry-on bags. Jeffrey Price, an aviation-security expert at Metropolitan State University of Denver, said the original ban focused on certain countries because their equipment to screen carry-on bags is not as effective as machines in the U.S. A French official who was briefed about Friday's meeting said the Americans announced they wanted to extend the ban, and the Europeans planned to formulate a response in coming days. The official said the primary questions revolved around when and how — and not whether — the ban would be imposed. The official spoke only on condition of anonymity to discuss the plan. Jenny Burke, a Homeland Security spokeswoman, said no final decision has been made on expanding the restriction. But Homeland Security officials met Thursday with high-ranking executives of the three leading U.S. airlines — American, Delta and United — and the industry's leading U.S. trade group, Airlines for America, to discuss expanding the laptop policy to flights arriving from Europe. Two airline officials who were briefed on the discussions said Homeland Security gave no timetable for an announcement, but they were resigned to its inevitability. They spoke only on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss the meeting publicly. The U.S. airlines still hope to have a say in how the policy is put into effect at airports to minimize inconvenience to passengers. The initial ban on passengers bringing large electronics devices into the cabin hit hardest at Middle Eastern airlines. Emirates, the Middle East's largest airline, this week cited the ban on electronics as one of the reasons for an 80 percent drop in profits last year. It said the ban had a direct impact on demand for air travel into the U.S. and it faced rising costs from introducing complimentary laptop loans to some passengers. Alain Bauer, president of the CNAPS, a French regulator of private-sector security agents, including those checking baggage and passengers in France's airports, predicted "chaotic" scenes initially if the ban was instituted. "Imagine the number of people who carry their laptops and tablets onto planes — not just adults, but also children," he told the AP. He said it would slow passage through security checks as people try to negotiate a way of keeping their laptops. "It's not like losing your water bottle or your scissors. It will take more time to negotiate," he said. "You need a lot of time to inform them and a lot of time for it to enter people's heads until it becomes a habit," he said. "After a week of quite big difficulties, 95 percent of people will understand the practicalities." The head of the International Air Transport Association said recently that the electronics ban is not an acceptable or effective long-term solution to security threats, and said the commercial impact is severe. An industry-backed group, the Airline Passenger Experience Association, said the U.S. government should consider alternatives. That could include routinely testing laptops for chemical residues associated with bombs, requiring owners to turn on their devices, and letting frequent travelers keep their electronics with them. The group's CEO, Joe Leader, noted that airlines have reduced service by more than 1 million long-haul seats in the 10 Middle Eastern and North African cities affected by the March policy. If it spreads to Europe, "it's simply a matter of time" before laptops are banned in the cabins of domestic U.S. flights, he said. At the Delta area of the Cincinnati airport, a sign warned passengers that beginning Saturday on flights returning to the U.S. any electronic devices other than a cellphone would have to be placed in checked baggage. The airline flies between Cincinnati and Paris. A Delta spokesman said the sign was posted in error by an employee at the airport. Asked if Delta had anticipated that the in-cabin ban on larger electronics would go into effect this week, the spokesman declined to comment. Leicester reported from Paris. Alicia Caldwell in Washington; David Koenig in Dallas; and Lori Hinnant in Paris contributed.


News Article | May 12, 2017
Site: hosted2.ap.org

US prepares to ban laptops on flights from Europe (AP) — The U.S. is expected to broaden its ban on in-flight laptops and tablets to include planes from the European Union, a move that would create logistical chaos on the world's busiest corridor of air travel. Alarmed at the proposal, which airline officials say is merely a matter of timing, European governments held urgent talks on Friday with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. The ban would affect trans-Atlantic routes that carry as many as 65 million people a year on over 400 daily flights, many of them business travelers who rely on their electronics to work during the flight. The ban would dwarf in size the current one, which was put in place in March and affects about 50 flights per day from 10 cities, mostly in the Middle East. Chief among the concerns are whether any new threat prompted the proposal and the relative safety of keeping in the cargo area a large number of electronics with lithium batteries, which have been known to catch fire. American officials were invited to Brussels next week to discuss the proposed ban, the EU said. European Commission spokeswoman Anna-Kaisa Itkonen said the EU had no new information about a specific security concern. U.S. officials have said the decision in March to bar laptops and tablets from the cabins of some international flights wasn't based on any specific threat but on longstanding concerns about extremists targeting jetliners. Experts say a bomb in the cabin would be easier to make and require less explosive force than one in the cargo hold. Baggage in cargo usually goes through a more sophisticated screening process than carry-on bags. Jeffrey Price, an aviation-security expert at Metropolitan State University of Denver, said the original ban focused on certain countries because their equipment to screen carry-on bags is not as effective as machines in the U.S. A French official who was briefed about Friday's meeting said the Americans announced they wanted to extend the ban, and the Europeans planned to formulate a response in coming days. The official said the primary questions revolved around when and how — and not whether — the ban would be imposed. The official spoke only on condition of anonymity to discuss the plan. Jenny Burke, a Homeland Security spokeswoman, said no final decision has been made on expanding the restriction. But Homeland Security officials met Thursday with high-ranking executives of the three leading U.S. airlines — American, Delta and United — and the industry's leading U.S. trade group, Airlines for America, to discuss expanding the laptop policy to flights arriving from Europe. Two airline officials who were briefed on the discussions said Homeland Security gave no timetable for an announcement, but they were resigned to its inevitability. They spoke only on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss the meeting publicly. The U.S. airlines still hope to have a say in how the policy is put into effect at airports to minimize inconvenience to passengers. The initial ban on passengers bringing large electronics devices into the cabin hit hardest at Middle Eastern airlines. Emirates, the Middle East's largest airline, this week cited the ban on electronics as one of the reasons for an 80 percent drop in profits last year. It said the ban had a direct impact on demand for air travel into the U.S. and it faced rising costs from introducing complimentary laptop loans to some passengers. Alain Bauer, president of the CNAPS, a French regulator of private-sector security agents, including those checking baggage and passengers in France's airports, predicted "chaotic" scenes initially if the ban was instituted. "Imagine the number of people who carry their laptops and tablets onto planes — not just adults, but also children," he told the AP. He said it would slow passage through security checks as people try to negotiate a way of keeping their laptops. "It's not like losing your water bottle or your scissors. It will take more time to negotiate," he said. "You need a lot of time to inform them and a lot of time for it to enter people's heads until it becomes a habit," he said. "After a week of quite big difficulties, 95 percent of people will understand the practicalities." The head of the International Air Transport Association said recently that the electronics ban is not an acceptable or effective long-term solution to security threats, and said the commercial impact is severe. An industry-backed group, the Airline Passenger Experience Association, said the U.S. government should consider alternatives. That could include routinely testing laptops for chemical residues associated with bombs, requiring owners to turn on their devices, and letting frequent travelers keep their electronics with them. The group's CEO, Joe Leader, noted that airlines have reduced service by more than 1 million long-haul seats in the 10 Middle Eastern and North African cities affected by the March policy. If it spreads to Europe, "it's simply a matter of time" before laptops are banned in the cabins of domestic U.S. flights, he said. Leicester reported from Paris. Alicia Caldwell in Washington; David Koenig in Dallas; and Lori Hinnant in Paris contributed.


News Article | May 12, 2017
Site: hosted2.ap.org

US prepares to ban laptops on flights from Europe (AP) — The U.S. is expected to broaden its ban on in-flight laptops and tablets to include planes from the European Union, a move that would create logistical chaos on the world's busiest corridor of air travel. Alarmed at the proposal, which airline officials say is merely a matter of timing, European governments held urgent talks on Friday with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. The ban would affect trans-Atlantic routes that carry as many as 65 million people a year on over 400 daily flights, many of them business travelers who rely on their electronics to work during the flight. The ban would dwarf in size the current one, which was put in place in March and affects about 50 flights per day from 10 cities, mostly in the Middle East. Chief among the concerns are whether any new threat prompted the proposal and the relative safety of keeping in the cargo area a large number of electronics with lithium batteries, which have been known to catch fire. American officials were invited to Brussels next week to discuss the proposed ban, the EU said. European Commission spokeswoman Anna-Kaisa Itkonen said the EU had no new information about a specific security concern. U.S. officials have said the decision in March to bar laptops and tablets from the cabins of some international flights wasn't based on any specific threat but on longstanding concerns about extremists targeting jetliners. Experts say a bomb in the cabin would be easier to make and require less explosive force than one in the cargo hold. Baggage in cargo usually goes through a more sophisticated screening process than carry-on bags. Jeffrey Price, an aviation-security expert at Metropolitan State University of Denver, said the original ban focused on certain countries because their equipment to screen carry-on bags is not as effective as machines in the U.S. A French official who was briefed about Friday's meeting said the Americans announced they wanted to extend the ban, and the Europeans planned to formulate a response in coming days. The official said the primary questions revolved around when and how — and not whether — the ban would be imposed. The official spoke only on condition of anonymity to discuss the plan. Jenny Burke, a Homeland Security spokeswoman, said no final decision has been made on expanding the restriction. But Homeland Security officials met Thursday with high-ranking executives of the three leading U.S. airlines — American, Delta and United — and the industry's leading U.S. trade group, Airlines for America, to discuss expanding the laptop policy to flights arriving from Europe. Two airline officials who were briefed on the discussions said Homeland Security gave no timetable for an announcement, but they were resigned to its inevitability. They spoke only on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss the meeting publicly. The U.S. airlines still hope to have a say in how the policy is put into effect at airports to minimize inconvenience to passengers. The initial ban on passengers bringing large electronics devices into the cabin hit hardest at Middle Eastern airlines. Emirates, the Middle East's largest airline, this week cited the ban on electronics as one of the reasons for an 80 percent drop in profits last year. It said the ban had a direct impact on demand for air travel into the U.S. and it faced rising costs from introducing complimentary laptop loans to some passengers. Alain Bauer, president of the CNAPS, a French regulator of private-sector security agents, including those checking baggage and passengers in France's airports, predicted "chaotic" scenes initially if the ban was instituted. "Imagine the number of people who carry their laptops and tablets onto planes — not just adults, but also children," he told the AP. He said it would slow passage through security checks as people try to negotiate a way of keeping their laptops. "It's not like losing your water bottle or your scissors. It will take more time to negotiate," he said. "You need a lot of time to inform them and a lot of time for it to enter people's heads until it becomes a habit," he said. "After a week of quite big difficulties, 95 percent of people will understand the practicalities." The head of the International Air Transport Association said recently that the electronics ban is not an acceptable or effective long-term solution to security threats, and said the commercial impact is severe. An industry-backed group, the Airline Passenger Experience Association, said the U.S. government should consider alternatives. That could include routinely testing laptops for chemical residues associated with bombs, requiring owners to turn on their devices, and letting frequent travelers keep their electronics with them. The group's CEO, Joe Leader, noted that airlines have reduced service by more than 1 million long-haul seats in the 10 Middle Eastern and North African cities affected by the March policy. If it spreads to Europe, "it's simply a matter of time" before laptops are banned in the cabins of domestic U.S. flights, he said. At the Delta area of the Cincinnati airport, a sign warned passengers that beginning Friday on flights returning to the U.S. any electronic devices other than a cellphone would have to be placed in checked baggage. The airline flies between Cincinnati and Paris. A Delta spokesman said the sign was posted in error by an employee at the airport. Asked if Delta had anticipated that the in-cabin ban on larger electronics would go into effect this week, the spokesman declined to comment. Leicester reported from Paris. Alicia Caldwell in Washington; David Koenig in Dallas; and Lori Hinnant in Paris contributed. Corrects to Friday, sted Saturday, in second to last paragraph.


News Article | May 12, 2017
Site: phys.org

Alarmed at the proposal, which airline officials say is merely a matter of timing, European governments held urgent talks on Friday with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. The ban would affect trans-Atlantic routes that carry as many as 65 million people a year on over 400 daily flights, many of them business travelers who rely on their electronics to work during the flight. The ban would dwarf in size the current one, which was put in place in March and affects about 50 flights per day from 10 cities, mostly in the Middle East. Chief among the concerns are whether any new threat prompted the proposal and the relative safety of keeping in the cargo area a large number of electronics with lithium batteries, which have been known to catch fire. American officials were invited to Brussels next week to discuss the proposed ban, the EU said. European Commission spokeswoman Anna-Kaisa Itkonen said the EU had no new information about a specific security concern. U.S. officials have said the decision in March to bar laptops and tablets from the cabins of some international flights wasn't based on any specific threat but on longstanding concerns about extremists targeting jetliners. Experts say a bomb in the cabin would be easier to make and require less explosive force than one in the cargo hold. Baggage in cargo usually goes through a more sophisticated screening process than carry-on bags. Jeffrey Price, an aviation-security expert at Metropolitan State University of Denver, said the original ban focused on certain countries because their equipment to screen carry-on bags is not as effective as machines in the U.S. A French official who was briefed about Friday's meeting said the Americans announced they wanted to extend the ban, and the Europeans planned to formulate a response in coming days. The official said the primary questions revolved around when and how—and not whether—the ban would be imposed. The official spoke only on condition of anonymity to discuss the plan. Jenny Burke, a Homeland Security spokeswoman, said no final decision has been made on expanding the restriction. But Homeland Security officials met Thursday with high-ranking executives of the three leading U.S. airlines—American, Delta and United—and the industry's leading U.S. trade group, Airlines for America, to discuss expanding the laptop policy to flights arriving from Europe. Two airline officials who were briefed on the discussions said Homeland Security gave no timetable for an announcement, but they were resigned to its inevitability. They spoke only on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss the meeting publicly. The U.S. airlines still hope to have a say in how the policy is put into effect at airports to minimize inconvenience to passengers. The initial ban on passengers bringing large electronics devices into the cabin hit hardest at Middle Eastern airlines. Emirates, the Middle East's largest airline, this week cited the ban on electronics as one of the reasons for an 80 percent drop in profits last year. It said the ban had a direct impact on demand for air travel into the U.S. and it faced rising costs from introducing complimentary laptop loans to some passengers. Alain Bauer, president of the CNAPS, a French regulator of private-sector security agents, including those checking baggage and passengers in France's airports, predicted "chaotic" scenes initially if the ban was instituted. "Imagine the number of people who carry their laptops and tablets onto planes—not just adults, but also children," he told the AP. He said it would slow passage through security checks as people try to negotiate a way of keeping their laptops. "It's not like losing your water bottle or your scissors. It will take more time to negotiate," he said. "You need a lot of time to inform them and a lot of time for it to enter people's heads until it becomes a habit," he said. "After a week of quite big difficulties, 95 percent of people will understand the practicalities." The head of the International Air Transport Association said recently that the electronics ban is not an acceptable or effective long-term solution to security threats, and said the commercial impact is severe. An industry-backed group, the Airline Passenger Experience Association, said the U.S. government should consider alternatives. That could include routinely testing laptops for chemical residues associated with bombs, requiring owners to turn on their devices, and letting frequent travelers keep their electronics with them. The group's CEO, Joe Leader, noted that airlines have reduced service by more than 1 million long-haul seats in the 10 Middle Eastern and North African cities affected by the March policy. If it spreads to Europe, "it's simply a matter of time" before laptops are banned in the cabins of domestic U.S. flights, he said. Explore further: No electronics on some US-bound jets from Mideast, Africa (Update 3)


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: S-STEM:SCHLR SCI TECH ENG&MATH | Award Amount: 199.72K | Year: 2013

The project by Metropolitan State University of Denver and its sister institutions Community College of Denver and University of Colorado-Denver, is integrating a 300 MHz FT-NMR (Fourier Transform-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) spectrometer into the organic laboratory. The incorporation of modern spectroscopic techniques is enhancing the skill set students need for success in STEM careers. The high resolution, sophisticated pulse sequences, and dramatically improved throughput of the FT-NMR is allowing a shift to inquiry- and discovery-based teaching laboratory experiences which in turn, is driving improvements in students ability to reach valid conclusions from data, in their scientific literacy, and in their technical writing. The project builds on preliminary data which demonstrates that students learn more and are more prepared for STEM careers and graduate study, when exposed to authentic research as opposed to traditional recipe/verification laboratory curriculum. In addition to the incorporation of effective, evidenced-based teaching practices in the organic laboratories of the three institutions, the students will produce a dynamic, web-based lab manual wherein they are the primary contributors, the development of which enhances student literacy skills, research ethics, laboratory stewardship, and experimental design. The project will lead to broadening participation in the sciences since the three institutions serve a large number of Colorados underrepresented-in-STEM student population as well as numerous students who transfer from community colleges.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: ROBERT NOYCE SCHOLARSHIP PGM | Award Amount: 74.00K | Year: 2015

Urban STEM Teacher Capacity Building at Metropolitan State University of Denver (MSU Denver) will prepare STEM majors with experiences, skills, and knowledge to become highly effective inquiry-based teachers committed to working in high-need urban schools. The capacity building phase will strengthen the foundations of the universitys science and mathematics licensure programs while also ensuring a possible future Noyce Scholarships & Stipends (S&S) program aligns with the needs of its K-12 and community partners. Particular emphasis will be placed on recruiting women and students of color into STEM majors and the teaching pipeline. MSU Denver currently partners with more than 20 metropolitan area school districts; the capacity developed under this grant will enhance these relationships to positively impact schools and districts throughout the extended Denver metro area. Primary goals for the project include expanding mutually beneficial partnerships with high-need school districts in the metro Denver area; ensuring the content and structure of mathematics and science teacher licensure programs support a future Noyce S&S program; developing an undergraduate physics teaching licensure program that includes engineering concepts; and collaborating with local partners to hone recruitment and retention strategies specific for students underrepresented in STEM fields. During the capacity building phase, data from diverse stakeholder groups will be collected and analyzed to improve program design, revise curricula, and enhance the classroom readiness of science and mathematics teacher candidates for urban contexts.

Metropolitan State University of Denver will research and develop the infrastructure needed for broad participation in a Track 1 Scholarships and Stipends Program (S&S) capacity building project called Urban STEM Teacher Capacity Building (U-STEM). The interdisciplinary Leadership Team will investigate what diverse U-STEM stakeholders recommend as key elements of a successful program design specific to MSU Denvers urban commuter setting and the needs of its first generation and underrepresented student populations. Focus groups and online surveys will be used with these stakeholders (e.g. STEM scholars, MSU Denver Physics administrators and faculty, School of Education administrators and faculty, MSU Denver Student Services administrators and staff, and partner school and district administrators and faculty). The Leadership Team will cultivate strong partnerships with local high-needs school districts; ensure that the content and structures of current licensure programs will effectively prepare and support S&S recipients through course programming, clinical field experiences, and integrated STEM instruction; develop an undergraduate teacher licensure program for physics majors that incorporates engineering coursework; create a Learning Assistant Program embedded with cultural responsiveness; and collaborate with community partners to develop and test effective recruitment and retention strategies that focus on increasing the percentage of underrepresented students majoring in STEM fields who successfully enter the K-12 teaching profession. This integration of research and education will build sustainable capacity for a possible Track 1 Noyce project at MSU Denver.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: ITEST | Award Amount: 989.53K | Year: 2016

This project will advance efforts of the Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST) program to better understand and promote practices that increase students motivations and capacities to pursue careers in fields of science, technology, engineering, or mathematics (STEM) by implementing a strategy that purposefully combines educational methodologies based on the Global Learning and Observation to Benefit the Environment program. This effort will address the need to prepare and inspire up to 6500 students to become interested and motivated in STEM fields and careers. Students will have opportunities to increase their knowledge and skills in earth system sciences topics by engaging in authentic online local and global activities; collaborating with peers on data-driven research projects, and interacting with scientists and mentors in face-to-face settings. Pre-service and in-service teachers will participate in summer institutes, academic year workshops, and in-class sessions to learn about and use pedagogies that will help them attract and retain more students in education pathways to STEM careers. These professional growth opportunities will be led by university faculty members, content and evaluation experts, STEM professionals, industry and workforce development specialists and professional education organization consultants. The goal is to modify and refine a community-based model that will comprehensively address teacher preparedness and student participation in STEM fields.

The project will use a mixed method design to collect data about goals specific to K-12 students level of awareness and interest in STEM careers, motivation to pursue the education necessary for these careers, improvement in 21st century skill development, and acquisition of STEM content knowledge through collaborative technology practices. Pre-post surveys, observations, interviews, focus group discussions, communication chat groups, and descriptive statistics will be used to capture data about the influence of project activities on students and teachers. Project outcomes will include the development of curriculum units that employ technology-driven project-based collaboration; embody intercultural competence, and promote the understanding of content knowledge in the earth sciences as well as 21st Century workforce skills. Outcomes will also include teacher professional development processes and material for preparing teachers to deliver these technology-based STEM units that will impact more than 20 metropolitan area school districts that will be reached through this effort. Beyond dissemination to partnering school districts, project results will also be disseminated at national and regional meetings and conferences such as the National Science Teachers Association, the International Society for Technology in Education, the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, and the American Educational Research Association. Publications will also be submitted to peer-reviewed journals. Project partners including the GLOBE Implementation Office, University of Colorado at Boulders Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, Open World Learning, and the Colorado Workforce Development Council will promote and disseminate results through their distribution and communication channels. Social media, especially those geared towards educators, will be utilized to promote project outcomes to appropriate groups in the educational community.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Continuing grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 620.31K | Year: 2013

The Denver Metro Chem Scholars (DMCS) program is providing financial assistance, effective student supports, and academic experiences leading to student degree completion. DMCS graduates are entering the STEM workforce or continuing their formal STEM education in graduate school. The project is supporting approximately 24 students spread across three cohorts, during their sophomore, junior and senior years, as they pursue Bachelors degrees in Chemistry. The DMCS program, led by a team of Chemistry faculty, is focused on retention and reducing the time-to-degree by augmenting existing student support services with peer mentoring, supplemental instruction, faculty-guided undergraduate research, enhanced academic advising, and workshops on post-graduation opportunities. Additional program features include collaborative cohort activities, a focus on science literacy, and professionalization into the scientific community through scholarly journal groups, conference participation, and engagement with student chapters of professional societies. Metropolitan State University Denver, with a total enrollment of over 23,000 and 94% from the metro area, serves more students of color (31.6% of the student population) than any other university or college in Colorado and is designated as an emerging Hispanic Serving Institution. Due to the diverse population served, the DMCS program is enabling students from underrepresented groups to persist, graduate, and pursue graduate education or enter the STEM workforce. Because all DMCS activities are open to all students, the project is leading to improved retention and graduation rates, and to an increase in the number of students pursuing undergraduate research.

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