Metropolitan Museum of Art

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Aimilios Lo from The Cooper Union has been awarded runner-up and will receive $10,000 in scholarship funds. The winner was chosen by a panel of notable judges in addition to David and Sybil Yurman.  Jury members included Paul Greenhalgh, Director and Professor of Art History of the Sainsbury Centre for the Visual Arts at the University of East Anglia, UK; Tara Donovan, an artist whose work is included in the collections of major institutions such as the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Indianapolis Museum of Art, among many others; and Hans Van de Bovenkamp, a world renowned sculptor. David Yurman, one of America's premier jewelry brands, launched the inaugural David Yurman Young Artist Prize in 2017. As a brand founded on artistic roots and a passion for artistry and innovation, this initiative supports one of the key missions of the Company to encourage young creatives in the arts and in education. The overarching theme of the first inaugural competition was Pure Form, inspired by David Yurman's collection of the same name—a striking yet visually minimalist capsule of pieces that explores the sculptural, essential, pure qualities of metal. It is both a highly artistic and deeply personal collection, recalling Yurman's origins as a sculptor.  Prior to founding his jewelry company, David Yurman was trained as a sculptor—he studied under renowned artists including Ernesto Gonzalez, Jacques Lipschitz and Theodore Roszak.  He is constantly inspired by those early working days. "The competition aims to support and encourage emerging young artists with an audience and platform to showcase their work," says David Yurman.  "I want to give the students confidence to continue to study art and consider a creative career.  I learned so much from my mentors about fine tuning my artistic language, and I continue to this today to reflect on their inspiration." Participating schools included Purchase College (State University of New York); Rhode Island School of Design; Penny W. Stamps School of Art & Design (University of Michigan); The Cooper Union; Otis College of Art and Design; Savannah College of Art and Design® and School of the Art Institute of Chicago. David Yurman is the premier American luxury jewelry brand with a mission to share in life's exceptional moments. Founded by two artists, David and Sybil Yurman, in New York in 1980, artistic inspiration, craftsmanship and unconventional yet elegant designs are at the core of the brand. The marriage of David's background in sculpture with Sybil's natural understanding of color and art yields signature jewelry designs; diamond, pearl, and gemstone jewelry and Swiss-crafted timepieces that are renowned for capturing the essence of relaxed American luxury. David Yurman collections are available at 47 retail and concession locations throughout the United States, Canada, France, the Middle East and at over 350 locations worldwide, through their exclusive authorized fine jewelry and timepiece network of retailers. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/david-yurman-announces-lila-reynolds-from-otis-college-of-art-and-design-as-winner-of-inaugural-2017-young-artist-prize-300456730.html


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

On May 17, Parsons Fashion will celebrate the 2017 graduating class of over 300 emerging designers and fashion professionals at a VIP reception and multi-level exhibition from 6:00 p.m. until 9:00 p.m. This year’s exhibition endeavors to empower graduates to innovate, experiment, and discover their unique voices amidst social, cultural, and political shifts that directly affect women, immigrants, and minorities. Media and VIP are invited to a private viewing and tour of the designs given by the program directors of the Parsons School of Design. The Graduate Exhibition will also feature Norman Norell and student work inspired by his legacy. Norrell is considered the first American fashion designer to compete successfully with French couture. In 1943 he received the first Coty American Fashion Critics Award, and in 1956 he was inducted into the Coty Hall of Fame. The New School Archives’ digital collections include records of his awards, biographical material, press clippings, fashion sketches, photographs, and publicity scrapbooks. Records of several fundraisers organized with Norman Norell's assistance and the Sixtieth Anniversary Dinner, at which Norell received a Parsons Medal, can be found in the Parsons School of Design Alumni Association records. Additionally, the Kellen Design Archives holds 16-mm film reels in which Norman Norell appears as a visiting guest critic at Parsons between 1943 and 1972. Finally, the Parsons Fashion Study Collection holds approximately 25 vintage Norell ensembles, some of which are currently installed at the 2017 Parsons Festival. Cakmak states, “The work exhibited here, curated by the School of Fashion’s program directors in BFA Fashion Design and AAS Fashion Design and Fashion Marketing, represents not only a high level of craft and a diverse range of aesthetics but also a critical awareness to addressing today’s societal issues. What's more, a Parsons education is grounded in social and environmental imperatives, enabling graduates to walk away with a clear understanding of how their work fits into the larger fashion landscape. This end-of-year exhibition showcases the most innovative, responsible, and significant fashion designs of our students,” says Cakmak. The Archive Display will include a Fashion Study Collection of 19th and 20th century couture and ready-to-wear fashion created by a noteworthy group of over 65 influential designers, many of whom have direct Parsons connections as alumni, critics, and instructors. This rare and unique collection of garments was donated to the university by the Costume Institute at the Metropolitan Museum of Art over the course of several years, starting in 2008. This collection highlights the value of hands-on learning. Its presence at Parsons has immeasurable value across schools and curricula and will serve past, present, and future students as well as faculty. Currently in the process of assessment, the school hopes to make the collection available to the fashion industry, academics, and the public at large. Highlights from this collection are on view at the 2017 Parsons Festival and include work by notable designers such as Claire McCardell, Norman Norell, Geoffrey Beene, Yves Saint Laurent, Pierre Balmain, and Coco Chanel. Future of Fashion Industry Panel In Conversation with Gary Wassner (CEO of Hilldun Corporation) Moderated by Martin Okner May 17, 5:30–6:30 PM Partner collaborations responsible for supporting the exhibition include AARP, American Woolen Company, Care + Wear, Hela, Hugo Boss, Kering, Lana Reale, Linea Pelle, Luxottica, Parlux, Politecnico Calzaturiero, Safilo, Solstiss, Sophie Hallette, Swarovski, UNFPA, and Zappos. About Parsons School of Design (newschool.edu/parsons) - Parsons School of Design at the New School, founded in 1896, is one of the leading institutions for art and design education in the world. Based in New York but active around the world, the school offers undergraduate and graduate programs in the full spectrum of art and design disciplines as well as online courses and degree and certificate programs. Critical thinking and collaboration are at the heart of a Parsons education. Parsons graduates are leaders in their respective fields, with a shared commitment to creatively and critically addressing the complexities of life in the 21st century.


News Article | May 10, 2017
Site: www.businessoffashion.com

NEW YORK, United States — Julien d’Ys prefers the term “hair artist” to hairstylist. Known for his unconventional approach (d’Ys was the first to purposefully make hair look dirty, using potions of grease, vodka, clay or powder), he’s earned the label, following in the grand tradition of France’s esteemed coiffeurs, from Marie Antoinette’s wig-makers to M. Alexandre. For more than three decades, d’Ys — who is also a painter, illustrator and photographer, “a bit like Jean Cocteau,” he proffers — has quietly made loud statements for runway shows, fashion shoots and, for the last decade, several of the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s annual Costume Institute exhibits. This year, the Frenchman did the hair for the Met’s recently opened exhibition on Rei Kawakubo, with whom d’Ys has collaborated closely since the reclusive Comme des Garçons designer first started showing in Paris in the early 1980s. “She always gives me just one word,” says d’Ys, sitting in the Colonial House Inn, a modest hotel in New York’s Chelsea. “One time, she gave me ‘invisible.’ That was difficult. I remember thinking, ‘It’s impossible, what am I going to do? No hair? Nothing?’ It made me crazy.” The result was lattices of melted transparent plastic rolls that seemingly dripped from the heads of the models as they walked in Comme des Garçons’s Spring 2017 show. “Usually I only have two weeks to do the pieces for the show and sometimes she [Kawakubo] doesn’t tell me the word until very late,” continues d’Ys. Once he has the word, he starts creating one of his famous “carnets:” a black, hardbound A3 sketchbook that captures every element of his creative process, bulging with drawings, painting, letters, collaged objects, photography, clippings and samples of the materials and tools that he employs. His most recent carnet, for Comme des Garçons Autumn/Winter 2017, opens with a picture of a basic steel scourer from a French supermarket; d’Ys’s response to the word “silver.” “I always try and do something industrial because Rei loves to work with industrial materials — and with history,” he says, explaining how he reimagined the tight coils of the steel scourers as deconstructed, cloud-like wigs. “Sometimes she doesn’t give me the word until a week before [the show], or she doesn’t know what it is,” he admits. But d’Ys is a seasoned expert and, like any good hairdresser, he can be relied upon to work quickly. In the stark exhibition space at the Met — a kind of all-white, clinically lit architectural installation that Kawakubo insisted on designing herself — half the mannequins are headless. The other half is bedecked in fantastically inventive headpieces by d’Ys, such as an 18th century wig crafted from rolls of tea-stained Mozart sheet music, gloopy trails of smoke-like lace, or even a three-foot platinum flame made of hair. “All of the wigs and headpieces [made for Comme des Garçons] are kept in an archive in Japan, but some pieces have just disappeared or been destroyed, so I knew that I would have to make a lot for this show,” he explains. “I create everything by hand by myself, so they are like couture sculptures.” Julien d’Ys grew up in the Breton port of Douarnenez, which he describes as “full of fishermen and butchers,” and steeped in the kind of local mythology that let his imagination run wild as a child. With his long wiry hair, charmingly creased Roman profile and signature worn-in waistcoat and cravat, he looks like a bohemian pirate in the Byronic style of Keith Richards. “Because it’s a port, we don’t know exactly where we came from,” he says with a smile. “We could be a bit Viking, a bit African, a bit pirate." Legend has it that somewhere off the coast of his hometown lay the long-submerged island of Ys, one of the most beautiful in Europe, which belonged to a fabled king; he was betrayed by his nymphomaniac daughter, Princess Dahut, who was said to have been turned into a mermaid with long, golden tresses. “That is what I dreamt of when I was a kid,” he says (Julien d’Ys is his adopted name; he prefers to keep his real name private). The mythical island also informs the name of his studio: Island d’Ys. “I would watch Michèle Mercier as Angélique, Marquise des Anges, and all I would want to do is draw and draw and draw. I didn’t like to go to school.” His parents later moved closer to Paris and, in his early teens, d’Ys set his sights on the French capital and began working at the glamorous Jean Louis-David salon. There, he cut the hair of Françoise Sagan, Hanna Schygulla and Catherine Deneuve, as well as Madame Claude’s real-life “belles du jour.” After a brief stint completing his national service in the French army, he returned to Paris and found himself working on Helmut Newton and Hans Feurer shoots for Italian Vogue. He soon caught the attention of Steven Meisel and the publicist Kezia Keeble; within a week he was in downtown New York living with models Isabelle Townsend and Leslie Winer. “It was the beginning of everything,” he says. “I worked non-stop with Meisel in New York from '86, which was the Stephen Sprouse show.” Sprouse was then the king of the downtown fashion scene and Meisel did the production for his Webster Hall shows. “Stephen asked, ‘What kind of look would you do if you were doing the hair for the show?’ and I said, ‘Like this,’” he recalls, motioning the perpendicular, choppy-banged style that Sprouse’s house model Teri Toye loved so much that she made it her signature. D’Ys was booked for the show and spent the night at Toye’s graffiti-covered apartment working on Nico-esque wigs for the girls and Beatles-inspired mod cuts for the boys. “New York was crazy,” says d’Ys, who ended up on a shoot with Andy Warhol taking Polaroids of children for Vogue Bambini. “We would go into the studio and just create,” he remembers. “We didn’t know what we were going to do and nothing was planned before. Now, they do meetings before and ask about every detail. I hate working like this. It was a very creative time back then. But when AIDS arrived, everything changed in New York, so I moved back to Paris and started to work with Karl Lagerfeld and Peter Lindbergh.” It was d’Ys who, back in the late '80s, brazenly chopped Linda Evangelista’s long hair to the nape of her neck and tossed it over her eyes, helping ignite the supermodel’s career. His work with Peter Lindbergh also helped to catapult the likes of Christy Turlington, Naomi Campbell and Cindy Crawford into the spotlight. At the same time, d’Ys started creating marcel-waved 'dos and frizzed demi-mondaine puffs for John Galliano’s earliest shows; for Galliano’s all-black show at São Schlumberger’s hôtel particulier, it was d’Ys who, at the very last minute, made Möbius strips of brightly coloured paper to sit alongside Stephen Jones’s flapper-inspired diamond-pinned cloches. He also became a regular in the pages of glossy fashion magazines, working alongside photographic giants such as Irving Penn and Richard Avedon, as well as styling the hair for Jil Sander and Karl Lagerfeld’s runway shows. “When I started on the train, I was working, working, working, and it was going fast,” says d’Ys, taking a moment to reflect on his career. “Now the train has slowed down. I want to do more of my art. I want to do a book too. I want to take more pictures, more artistic couture. I want to create my own work.” Unlike many of his contemporaries, d’Ys has never put his name to a line of products or become a consultant. “I make the money I make, and for me it’s good. I have this contract with people from Kyoto who sponsored me with products and that has helped me a lot.” The thought of d’Ys creating a shampoo is hardly conceivable considering he pioneered the "dirty" hair aesthetic, which is all about dramatically matted textures. “One day Linda Evangelista’s boyfriend told me I’d make a lot of money doing products, and Linda turned around and said, ‘But Julien never washed his hair!’ I was laughing that if I did a shampoo, I would call it ‘Dirty Shampoo.’” D’Ys now only does showpieces for Comme des Garçons, in part, he says, because the industry has changed. “When I was doing the shows, I saw the difference when all these girls came from Russia and they all looked the same,” he explains. “Before, when we were doing shows, all the supermodels were doing the show and it was like a party! There would be champagne and it was wild, you know? We had so much fun! Now the girls, they’re like robots.” He laughs at how all the models are now constantly on their mobile phones during shows and shoots. “The first girl was Naomi. I remember, it was like a big walkie-talkie!” And despite the fact that he has taken to Instagram, d’Ys remains adamant that he prefers to stay out of the limelight. “You have a secret garden, a secret life that nobody knows about. I have many things I don't want to tell people,” he says. D’Ys is quick to add that he is not interested in straightforward jobs that don’t satisfy his inner creativity. “People, if they use me they have to accept the way I am and what I'm going to bring to them, and not just what they want. When I’m not free, I’m bad at it. When people trust me, I'm very good.”


News Article | May 10, 2017
Site: www.businessoffashion.com

NEW YORK, United States — Julien d’Ys prefers the term “hair artist” to hairstylist. Known for his unconventional approach (d’Ys was the first to purposefully make hair look dirty, using potions of grease, vodka, clay or powder), he’s earned the label, following in the grand tradition of France’s esteemed coiffeurs, from Marie Antoinette’s wig-makers to M. Alexandre. For more than three decades, d’Ys — who is also a painter, illustrator and photographer, “a bit like Jean Cocteau,” he proffers — has quietly made loud statements for runway shows, fashion shoots and, for the last decade, several of the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s annual Costume Institute exhibits. This year, the Frenchman did the hair for the Met’s recently opened exhibition on Rei Kawakubo, with whom d’Ys has collaborated closely since the reclusive Comme des Garçons designer first started showing in Paris in the early 1980s. “She always gives me just one word,” says d’Ys, sitting in the Colonial House Inn, a modest hotel in New York’s Chelsea. “One time, she gave me ‘invisible.’ That was difficult. I remember thinking, ‘It’s impossible, what am I going to do? No hair? Nothing?’ It made me crazy.” The result was lattices of melted transparent plastic rolls that seemingly dripped from the heads of the models as they walked in Comme des Garçons’s Spring 2017 show. “Usually I only have two weeks to do the pieces for the show and sometimes she [Kawakubo] doesn’t tell me the word until very late,” continues d’Ys. Once he has the word, he starts creating one of his famous “carnets:” a black, hardbound A3 sketchbook that captures every element of his creative process, bulging with drawings, painting, letters, collaged objects, photography, clippings and samples of the materials and tools that he employs. His most recent carnet, for Comme des Garçons Autumn/Winter 2017, opens with a picture of a basic steel scourer from a French supermarket; d’Ys’s response to the word “silver.” “I always try and do something industrial because Rei loves to work with industrial materials — and with history,” he says, explaining how he reimagined the tight coils of the steel scourers as deconstructed, cloud-like wigs. “Sometimes she doesn’t give me the word until a week before [the show], or she doesn’t know what it is,” he admits. But d’Ys is a seasoned expert and, like any good hairdresser, he can be relied upon to work quickly. In the stark exhibition space at the Met — a kind of all-white, clinically lit architectural installation that Kawakubo insisted on designing herself — half the mannequins are headless. The other half is bedecked in fantastically inventive headpieces by d’Ys, such as an 18th century wig crafted from rolls of tea-stained Mozart sheet music, gloopy trails of smoke-like lace, or even a three-foot platinum flame made of hair. “All of the wigs and headpieces [made for Comme des Garçons] are kept in an archive in Japan, but some pieces have just disappeared or been destroyed, so I knew that I would have to make a lot for this show,” he explains. “I create everything by hand by myself, so they are like couture sculptures.” Julien d’Ys grew up in the Breton port of Douarnenez, which he describes as “full of fishermen and butchers,” and steeped in the kind of local mythology that let his imagination run wild as a child. With his long wiry hair, charmingly creased Roman profile and signature worn-in waistcoat and cravat, he looks like a bohemian pirate in the Byronic style of Keith Richards. “Because it’s a port, we don’t know exactly where we came from,” he says with a smile. “We could be a bit Viking, a bit African, a bit pirate." Legend has it that somewhere off the coast of his hometown lay the long-submerged island of Ys, one of the most beautiful in Europe, which belonged to a fabled king; he was betrayed by his nymphomaniac daughter, Princess Dahut, who was said to have been turned into a mermaid with long, golden tresses. “That is what I dreamt of when I was a kid,” he says (Julien d’Ys is his adopted name; he prefers to keep his real name private). The mythical island also informs the name of his studio: Island d’Ys. “I would watch Michèle Mercier as Angélique, Marquise des Anges, and all I would want to do is draw and draw and draw. I didn’t like to go to school.” His parents later moved closer to Paris and, in his early teens, d’Ys set his sights on the French capital and began working at the glamorous Jean Louis-David salon. There, he cut the hair of Françoise Sagan, Hanna Schygulla and Catherine Deneuve, as well as Madame Claude’s real-life “belles du jour.” After a brief stint completing his national service in the French army, he returned to Paris and found himself working on Helmut Newton and Hans Feurer shoots for Italian Vogue. He soon caught the attention of Steven Meisel and the publicist Kezia Keeble; within a week he was in downtown New York living with models Isabelle Townsend and Leslie Winer. “It was the beginning of everything,” he says. “I worked non-stop with Meisel in New York from '86, which was the Stephen Sprouse show.” Sprouse was then the king of the downtown fashion scene and Meisel did the production for his Webster Hall shows. “Stephen asked, ‘What kind of look would you do if you were doing the hair for the show?’ and I said, ‘Like this,’” he recalls, motioning the perpendicular, choppy-banged style that Sprouse’s house model Teri Toye loved so much that she made it her signature. D’Ys was booked for the show and spent the night at Toye’s graffiti-covered apartment working on Nico-esque wigs for the girls and Beatles-inspired mod cuts for the boys. “New York was crazy,” says d’Ys, who ended up on a shoot with Andy Warhol taking Polaroids of children for Vogue Bambini. “We would go into the studio and just create,” he remembers. “We didn’t know what we were going to do and nothing was planned before. Now, they do meetings before and ask about every detail. I hate working like this. It was a very creative time back then. But when AIDS arrived, everything changed in New York, so I moved back to Paris and started to work with Karl Lagerfeld and Peter Lindbergh.” It was d’Ys who, back in the late '80s, brazenly chopped Linda Evangelista’s long hair to the nape of her neck and tossed it over her eyes, helping ignite the supermodel’s career. His work with Peter Lindbergh also helped to catapult the likes of Christy Turlington, Naomi Campbell and Cindy Crawford into the spotlight. At the same time, d’Ys started creating marcel-waved 'dos and frizzed demi-mondaine puffs for John Galliano’s earliest shows; for Galliano’s all-black show at São Schlumberger’s hôtel particulier, it was d’Ys who, at the very last minute, made Möbius strips of brightly coloured paper to sit alongside Stephen Jones’s flapper-inspired diamond-pinned cloches. He also became a regular in the pages of glossy fashion magazines, working alongside photographic giants such as Irving Penn and Richard Avedon, as well as styling the hair for Jil Sander and Karl Lagerfeld’s runway shows. “When I started on the train, I was working, working, working, and it was going fast,” says d’Ys, taking a moment to reflect on his career. “Now the train has slowed down. I want to do more of my art. I want to do a book too. I want to take more pictures, more artistic couture. I want to create my own work.” Unlike many of his contemporaries, d’Ys has never put his name to a line of products or become a consultant. “I make the money I make, and for me it’s good. I have this contract with people from Kyoto who sponsored me with products and that has helped me a lot.” The thought of d’Ys creating a shampoo is hardly conceivable considering he pioneered the "dirty" hair aesthetic, which is all about dramatically matted textures. “One day Linda Evangelista’s boyfriend told me I’d make a lot of money doing products, and Linda turned around and said, ‘But Julien never washed his hair!’ I was laughing that if I did a shampoo, I would call it ‘Dirty Shampoo.’” D’Ys now only does showpieces for Comme des Garçons, in part, he says, because the industry has changed. “When I was doing the shows, I saw the difference when all these girls came from Russia and they all looked the same,” he explains. “Before, when we were doing shows, all the supermodels were doing the show and it was like a party! There would be champagne and it was wild, you know? We had so much fun! Now the girls, they’re like robots.” He laughs at how all the models are now constantly on their mobile phones during shows and shoots. “The first girl was Naomi. I remember, it was like a big walkie-talkie!” And despite the fact that he has taken to Instagram, d’Ys remains adamant that he prefers to stay out of the limelight. “You have a secret garden, a secret life that nobody knows about. I have many things I don't want to tell people,” he says. D’Ys is quick to add that he is not interested in straightforward jobs that don’t satisfy his inner creativity. “People, if they use me they have to accept the way I am and what I'm going to bring to them, and not just what they want. When I’m not free, I’m bad at it. When people trust me, I'm very good.”


News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

A May 2 article on Vanity Fair covers the star studded assortment of world famous fashionistas who attended the 2017 Met Gala, an annual event hosted by New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art. The article stresses that such notables as Gisele Bündchen pointed out the significance of the fundraising event in the midst of today’s increasingly divisive national scene and threats to public funding for the arts. Los Angeles based fabric wholesaler Fabric Selection Inc. says that it believes very strongly that fashion is, indeed, one of the arts and that everyone from budding designers to highly established manufacturers needs to have the kind of fuel for their creativity that’s provided by an outstanding fabric wholesaler. Fabric Selection Inc. notes that today’s fashionistas and all types of clothemakers can benefit from a wealth of choices in terms of materials and designs. They add that choices are at the heart of all creativity and so it’s crucial to provide innovative clothing designers with a plethora of options. They add that today’s quality fabric providers offer a stunning array of materials, from such fashion standbys as wholesale cotton fabric to such state of the art synthetics as micro suede. Fashion is very much an art form on the same level as music and graphic art, and every artist needs the widest possible palates, says Fabric Selection Inc. The firm notes that providing a very wide selection of materials, including jacquard, French terry, linen, denim, mesh, and velvet in a wide array of colors means that designers and manufacturers can choose from materials that are not only beautiful, but which feel and perform in a variety of ways, so that consumers not only look good when they wear your products, they feel good as well. The firm also points out that it provides a range of designs and patterns that can really provide designers and manufacturers with all the choices they can possibly need to make eye-catching designs that flatter people of all ages and sizes. Fabric Selection Inc. also notes that its customers can use these designs freely, as the firm owns the copyright to all its designs, so customers don’t have to worry about any legal issues that may arise due to their use of purchased materials Readers who are interested in learning more about Fabric Selection Inc. are invited to visit them on the Internet at http://www.FabricSelection.com. The firm’s offices are open five days a week, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. PST, and the firm is reachable 24 hours a day, seven days a week, via e-mail.


News Article | May 3, 2017
Site: www.cnet.com

In case you missed it, the 2017 Met Gala took place Monday night. Apple was there as a sponsor, but it didn't break any iPhone 8 news, and sponsor Warner Bros. didn't break any news on the upcoming "Justice League" movie. The only thing broken, it appears, was the Met Gala's "no selfie rule," which was infringed by none other than Kylie Jenner, plus several other celebs. The annual Costume Institute Benefit at New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art marks one of the year's biggest celebrations of art and fashion. This year's theme was Kawakubo/Comme des Garcons, which refers to "avant garde" or over-the-top clothes that cost as much as your car. (Check out some shots from last year's tech-themed event in the gallery below.) Anna Wintour, editor-in-chief of Vogue, instated a ban on all social media at the Met Gala gala in 2015. But while organizers of the gala asked that no one post selfies, 19-year-old Jenner disregarded the "no selfie" policy yet again -- just like she did last year. That's right, celebrities dressed in high-end fashion you want the world to see. Kiss your Snapchat, Instagram, Periscope goodbye, and don't even think about going Facebook Live. But why such a restriction for such a high-profile event? The Costume Institute declined to comment. It makes sense an event like this would want to maintain exclusivity and provide photo ops for distributors like Getty, but could a selfie really hurt? But really, who's going to stop Beyoncé from snapping a shot of her stunning dress? Selfie bans are not unheard of. Two years ago, for example, the Cannes Film Festival clamped down on red-carpet selfies, saying all those smartphone snaps slow things down. Technically Incorrect: Bringing you a fresh and irreverent take on tech. Virtual reality 101: CNET tells you everything you need to know about what VR is and how it'll affect your life.


Centeno S.A.,Metropolitan Museum of Art
Journal of Raman Spectroscopy | Year: 2016

The aim of the present article is to highlight publications that illustrate some advances in the application of Raman spectroscopy to investigate materials typically observed in manuscripts, drawings, prints, and paintings in museums' and cultural institutions' collections, and to discuss some of the challenges and future prospects. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: Chemical Measurement & Imaging | Award Amount: 481.90K | Year: 2010

With support from the Chemical Measurement and Imaging program, Julie Arslanoglu of New Yorks Metropolitan Museum, of Art and John Loike of Columbia University seek to develop and improve methodologies such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection, identification, and localization of proteins and gums in art. Identification of these diverse biological materials (found in paints, coatings, and adhesives) will improve understanding essential for informed treatment, preservation, and authentication. The approaches developed will improve specificity in identification, enabling for example distinction between use of whole egg or only egg white as a gilding adhesive, or the use of sturgeon?s glue or goat?s milk explicitly as a paint binder. Parallel mass spectrometric studies should enable identification of specific targets for improved characterization, and aptamer technology is being used to identify organic molecules in art. The complementary nature of these techniques is being explored. Finally, the localization of proteins and polysaccharide in paint or coating layers in cross-sections is being characterized using Surface Enhanced Raman (SERS)-labeled antibodies. This will greatly enhance knowledge of an artist?s technique as well as conservation treatment.

In addition to important insights into the preservation and authentication of cultural heritage objects, methods developed in these studies should contribute to other fields affected by similar limitations (low concentration of highly degraded organic materials with interfering inorganic ions), such as environmental monitoring or forensic analysis. The research entails teaching and training of students and postdocs interested in the science of preservation of cultural heritage. Results will be widely disseminated to the general public through websites and presentations in the museum setting, as well as scholarly conferences and publications.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: Chemical Measurement & Imaging | Award Amount: 378.69K | Year: 2011

With support from the Chemical Measurement and Imaging program in the Division of Chemistry, Dr. Silvia Centeno of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City and Prof. Cecil Dybowski of the University of Delaware, will study the mechanism of aggregation of lead carboxylates (lead soaps) in oil paintings. Aggregation of lead carboxylates in oil paintings is known to lead to the formation of protrusions and paint loss in most cases, and to increased transparency of the paint films in others, resulting in damage to the integrity of the artworks. While widely observed, the phenomenon is not well understood. The collaborating investigators, their students and postdoctoral trainees will determine the structure, molecular dynamics, and phase behavior of lead carboxylates using solid state 13C,207Pb magic-angle-spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), 1H-207Pb and 13C-207Pb dipolar re-coupling experiments, and deuterium NMR along with other analytical tools. They will elucidate the mechanism of aggregate formation/migration and based on the results, recommend procedures to arrest the deterioration process of oil paintings.

The solid state NMR experiments have the potential to transform the field of cultural heritage science since they will provide molecular information, which is not currently available to the cultural heritage science community. The experiments are a gateway to the application of emerging minimally invasive NMR methods like micro-MAS NMR to study cultural heritage objects. Advancing the state of the art for 207Pb solid-state NMR also has broader implications for understanding the structure of lead-containing electronic and optoelectronic materials, high-Tc superconducting materials, and the speciation and reaction of lead in environmentally contaminated materials. The project will provide excellent training opportunities to students and postdoctoral researchers who wish to train in state of the art solid state NMR methods and cultural heritage science. Results of this study will be widely disseminated to the public through museum programs and publications.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: SOLID STATE & MATERIALS CHEMIS | Award Amount: 295.00K | Year: 2016

Non-technical Abstract
Irreplaceable masterworks of art dating from the 14th century through the 20th century are slowly deteriorating due to chemical reactions among the paint components. One step believed to be important in this complex process is the movement of ions and molecules through the paint. In this project, the dynamics and transport of materials such as water and solvents in paint films are examined to determine (1) the nature of the process, and (2) what factors affect this process. Paint films are complex materials, and they must be studied with multiple techniques to characterize the processes as completely as possible. With the support from the Solid State and Materials Chemistry program in the Division of Materials Research and the Chemical Measurement and Imaging program in the Division of Chemistry, the ongoing collaboration between the University of Delaware and The Metropolitan Museum of Art to address the deterioration of paintings with modern technologies is expanded by the involvement of scientists at Brookhaven National Laboratory and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to provide additional unique analyses of materials prepared at The Metropolitan Museum of Art and the University of Delaware and of microscopic samples removed works of art affected, to provide answers to questions like Why and how does this process occur? and What types of actions can be taken to minimize or eliminate these processes that ultimately destroy priceless art objects? The project, through outreach carried out by The Metropolitan Museum of Art and the University of Delaware, provides the public with a tangible connection between scientific discovery and the elements of culture and history, at the same time as it develops an understanding of complex chemical processes that affect more than just paintings.

Technical Abstract
The reaction of heavy-metal-containing pigments with fatty acids in oil paintings, derived from the oil paint binders, produces metal carboxylates also called soaps. These soaps may produce disfiguring inclusions, surface crusts and/or increased transparency of the paints, resulting in unwanted and ultimately deleterious effects. Most oil paintings suffer from this process to some degree. From a scientific perspective, the process consists of a series of steps: (1) production of free fatty acids by hydrolysis of the oil; (2) migration of acids and pigment-derived ions; (3) the reactive event; and (4) agglomeration of the products to produce soap aggregates or migration to the paint film surface to produce crusts. Each step is important and complex, in part due to the heterogeneity of the material. This project focuses on the dynamics of materials in the paint films, predominantly characterizing step 2, but the dynamics are also important as materials like water and solvents, sometimes from restoration interventions, and environmental effects may be involved in steps 1 and 4. Additionally, because these materials are heterogeneous, one must simultaneously consider the effects of properties such as pigment particle size and shape, and porosity of the paint in understanding the nature of these process. This can only be achieved by a multi-pronged approach to characterize samples treated in different ways. By combining the strengths of the Metropolitan Museum, the University of Delaware together with expertise at Brookhaven National Laboratory and Pacific Northwest Laboratory, several sophisticated technologies are directed towards understanding the process. The novel strategy proposed to study a complex heterogeneous multilayered system is applicable to the characterization of analogous problems in the field of soft matter science.

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