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Durham, NC, United States

Stenner A.J.,MetaMetrics Inc. | Stone M.,Aurora University
Journal of Applied Measurement | Year: 2010

We argue that a goal of measurement is general objectivity: point estimates of a person's measure (height, temperature, and reader ability) should be independent of the instrument and independent of the sample in which the person happens to find herself. In contrast, Rasch's concept of specific objectivity requires only differences (i.e., comparisons) between person measures to be independent of the instrument. We present a canonical case in which there is no overlap between instruments and persons: each person is measured by a unique instrument. We then show what is required to estimate measures in this degenerate case. The canonical case encourages a simplification and reconceptualization of validity and reliability. Not surprisingly, this reconceptualization looks a lot like the way physicists and chemometricians think about validity and measurement error. We animate this presentation with a technology that blurs the distinction between instruction, assessment, and generally objective measurement of reader ability. We encourage adaptation of this model to health outcomes measurement. Source


Stenner A.J.,MetaMetrics Inc. | Fisher W.P.,University of California at Berkeley
Journal of Physics: Conference Series | Year: 2013

The central importance of reading ability in learning makes it the natural place to start in formative and summative assessments in education. The Lexile Framework for Reading constitutes a commercial metrological traceability network linking books, test results, instructional materials, and students in elementary and secondary English and Spanish language reading education in the U.S., Canada, Mexico, and Australia. © Published under licence by IOP Publishing Ltd. Source


Fisher W.P.,University of California at Berkeley | Stenner A.J.,MetaMetrics Inc.
Journal of Physics: Conference Series | Year: 2013

The public and researchers in psychology and the social sciences are largely unaware of the huge resources invested in metrology and standards in science and commerce, for understandable reasons, but with unfortunate consequences. Measurement quality varies widely in fields lacking uniform standards, making it impossible to coordinate local behaviours and decisions in tune with individually observed instrument readings. However, recent developments in reading measurement have effectively instituted metrological traceability methods within elementary and secondary English and Spanish language reading education in the U.S., Canada, Mexico, and Australia. Given established patterns in the history of science, it may be reasonable to expect that widespread routine reproduction of controlled effects expressed in uniform units in the social sciences may lead to significant developments in theory and practice. © Published under licence by IOP Publishing Ltd. Source


Fisher Jr. W.P.,University of California at Berkeley | Stenner A.J.,MetaMetrics Inc.
14th Joint International IMEKO TC1, TC7, TC13 Symposium on Intelligent Quality Measurements - Theory, Education and Training 2011, Held in Conj. with the 56th IWK Ilmenau University of Technology | Year: 2011

Measurement plays a vital role in the creation of markets, one that hinges on efficiencies gained via the universal availability of precise and accurate information on product quantity and quality. Fulfilling the potential of these ideals requires close attention to measurement and the role of technology in science and the economy. The practical value of a strong theory of instrument calibration and metrological traceability stems from the capacity to mediate relationships in ways that align, coordinate, and integrate different firms' expectations, investments, and capital budgeting decisions over the long term. Improvements in the measurement of reading ability exhibit patterns analogous to Moore's Law, which has guided expectations in the microprocessor industry for almost 50 years. The state of the art in reading measurement serves as a model for generalizing the mediating role of instruments in making markets for other forms of intangible assets. These remarks provide only a preliminary sketch of the kinds of information that are both available and needed for making more efficient markets for human, social, and natural capital. Nevertheless, these initial steps project new horizons in the arts and sciences of measuring and managing intangible assets. Source


Fisher W.P.,University of California at Berkeley | Stenner A.J.,MetaMetrics Inc.
Journal of Physics: Conference Series | Year: 2015

The self-conscious awareness of language and its use is arguably nowhere more intense than in metrology. The careful and deliberate coordination and alignment of shared metrological frames of reference for theory, experiment, and practical application have been characteristics of scientific culture at least since the origins of the SI units in revolutionary France. Though close attention has been focused on the logical and analytical aspects of language use in science, little concern has been shown for understanding how the social and historical aspects of everyday language may have foreshadowed and influenced the development and character of metrological language, especially relative to the inevitably partial knowledge possessed by any given stakeholder participating in the scientific enterprise. Insight in this regard may be helpful in discerning how and if an analogous role for metrology might be created in psychology and the social sciences. It may be that the success of psychology as a science will depend less on taking physics as the relevant model than on attending to the interplay of concepts, models, and social organization that make any culture effective. © Published under licence by IOP Publishing Ltd. Source

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