Kfar Saba, Israel
Kfar Saba, Israel

Metacure is a medical device company dedicated to the development and commercialization of minimally invasive treatment for diabesity, the combination of Diabetes Type 2 and obesity, arguably today's most prevalent global health epidemic. Wikipedia.

SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Lebovitz H.E.,New York University | Ludvik B.,Medical University of Vienna | Yaniv I.,MetaCure | Schwartz T.,Biostatistics and Medical Device Research Division at GCP Clinical Studies | And 2 more authors.
Hormone and Metabolic Research | Year: 2015

Abstract The objectives of the present work are to evaluate long-term benefit of nonexcitatory gastric electrical stimulation (GES) by the DIAMOND® device on glycemic control and body weight in patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled with oral agents and to determine the magnitude of the modulating effects of fasting plasma triglyceride (FTG) levels on these effects of GES. Sixty one patients with type 2 diabetes [HbA1c>7.0% (53 mmol/mol) to<10.5% (91 mmol/mol)] were implanted with the DIAMOND® GES device and treated with meal-mediated antral electrical stimulation for up to 36 months. The effects of baseline HbA1c and FTG on glycemic control, body weight, and systolic blood pressure were measured. GES reduced mean HbA1c by 0.9% and body weight by 5.7%. The effects were greater in patients with normal fasting plasma triglycerides (NTG) as compared to those with hypertriglyceridemia. The mean decrease in HbA1c in patients with NTG averaged 1.1% and was durable over 3 years of follow-up. ANCOVA indicated that improvement in HbA1c was a function of both baseline FTG group (p=0.02) and HbA1c (p=0.001) and their interaction (p=0.01). Marked weight loss (≥ 10%) was observed in a significant proportion of NTG patients by 12 months of treatment and persisted through the 3 years. GES improves glycemic control and reduces body weight by a triglyceride-dependent mechanism in patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled on oral agents. It is postulated that this is through a gut-brain interaction that modulates effects on the liver and pancreatic islets. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG.


PubMed | MetaCure, Biostatistics and Medical Device Research Division at GCP Clinical Studies, Medical College of Wisconsin, New York University and Medical University of Vienna
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Hormone and metabolic research = Hormon- und Stoffwechselforschung = Hormones et metabolisme | Year: 2015

The objectives of the present work are to evaluate long-term benefit of nonexcitatory gastric electrical stimulation (GES) by the DIAMOND() device on glycemic control and body weight in patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled with oral agents and to determine the magnitude of the modulating effects of fasting plasma triglyceride (FTG) levels on these effects of GES. Sixty one patients with type 2 diabetes [HbA1c > 7.0% (53 mmol/mol) to < 10.5% (91 mmol/mol)] were implanted with the DIAMOND() GES device and treated with meal-mediated antral electrical stimulation for up to 36 months. The effects of baseline HbA1c and FTG on glycemic control, body weight, and systolic blood pressure were measured. GES reduced mean HbA1c by 0.9% and body weight by 5.7%. The effects were greater in patients with normal fasting plasma triglycerides (NTG) as compared to those with hypertriglyceridemia. The mean decrease in HbA1c in patients with NTG averaged 1.1% and was durable over 3 years of follow-up. ANCOVA indicated that improvement in HbA1c was a function of both baseline FTG group (p = 0.02) and HbA1c (p = 0.001) and their interaction (p = 0.01). Marked weight loss ( 10%) was observed in a significant proportion of NTG patients by 12 months of treatment and persisted through the 3 years. GES improves glycemic control and reduces body weight by a triglyceride-dependent mechanism in patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled on oral agents. It is postulated that this is through a gut-brain interaction that modulates effects on the liver and pancreatic islets.


Bohdjalian A.,University of Vienna | Aviv R.,MetaCure | Prager G.,University of Vienna | Schindler K.,Medical University of Vienna | And 3 more authors.
Obesity Surgery | Year: 2012

Background: The association between phase II of the motor migratory complex (MMC) and hunger remains poorly understood, which may be important in non-diabetic and diabetic obese subjects where gastric inter-digestive motility has been often reported as impaired. We characterize phase II of the MMC and its predictive power on food intake, weight loss, and glycemia in non-diabetic (OB) and diabetic (DM) obese subjects treated with gastric stimulation for 6 months. Methods: Twelve OB and 12 DM subjects were implanted with bipolar electrodes connected to a gastric stimulator capable of recording antrum electromechanical activity. Results: The phase II mean interval size and duration increased from 156∈±∈121 to 230∈±∈228 s and from 98∈±∈33 to 130∈±∈35 min (p∈<∈0. 05) in OB and from 158∈±∈158 to180∈±∈112 s and from 77∈±∈26 to 109∈±∈18 min (p∈<∈0.05) in DM after 6 months. There was a significant trend of meals to interrupt the late rather than the early phase II. Nonlinear regression analysis demonstrated that weight loss in OB was significantly associated with the change in interval size of the late phase II and with phase II duration. In the DM group, weight loss and glycemia were also significantly associated with the change in the interval size of the early phase II. Conclusions: Gastric stimulation delivered in the digestive period can modify the length of the MMC and the contractility in its longest component, phase II. The duration and contractility of the MMC can determine to some extent future intake and, thus, influence energy balance. © 2012 Springer Science + Business Media, LLC.


Lebovitz H.E.,New York University | Ludvik B.,Medical University of Vienna | Yaniv I.,MetaCure | Haddad W.,MetaCure | And 2 more authors.
Diabetic Medicine | Year: 2013

Background: Non-stimulatory, meal-mediated electrical stimulation of the stomach (TANTALUS-DIAMOND) improves glycaemic control and causes modest weight loss in patients with Type 2 diabetes who are inadequately controlled on oral anti-diabetic medications. The magnitude of the glycaemic response in clinical studies has been variable. A preliminary analysis of data from patients who had completed 6 months of treatment indicated that the glycaemic response to the electrical stimulation was inversely related to the baseline fasting plasma triglyceride level. Method: An analysis of 40 patients who had had detailed longitudinal studies for 12 months. Results: Twenty-two patients with fasting plasma triglycerides ≤ 1.7 mmol/l had mean decreases in HbA1c after 3, 6 and 12 months of gastric contraction modulation treatment of -15 ± 2.1 mmol/mol (-1.39 ± 0.20%), -16 ± 2.2 mmol/mol (-1.48 ± 0.20%) and -14 ± 3.0 mmol/mol (-1.31 ± 0.26%), respectively. In contrast, 18 patients with fasting plasma triglyceride > 1.7 mmol/l had mean decreases in HbA1c of -7 ± 1.7 mmol/mol (-0.66 ± 0.16%), -5 ± 1.6 mmol/mol (-0.44 ± 0.18%) and -5 ± 1.7 mmol/mol (-0.42 ± 0.16%), respectively. Pearson's correlation coefficient between fasting plasma triglyceride and decreases in HbA1c at 12 months of treatment was 0.34 (P < 0.05). Homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance was unchanged during 12 months of treatment in patients with high baseline fasting triglycerides, while it progressively improved in patients with low fasting plasma triglycerides. Patients with low fasting plasma triglycerides had a tendency to lose more weight than those with high fasting plasma triglycerides, but this did not achieve statistical significance. Conclusions: The data presented suggest the existance of a triglyceride lipotoxic mechanism that interferes with gastric/neural mediated pathways that can regulate glycaemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. The data suggest the existence of a triglyceride lipotoxic pathway that interferes with gastric/neural mediated pathways that can regulate glycaemic control. © 2013 Diabetes UK.


Patent
MetaCure | Date: 2014-07-16

A method of promoting the healing of a lesion in a smooth muscle (200), comprises selecting a smooth muscle portion having a lesion, and applying a non-excitory electric field (210) to the portion, which reduces the mechanical activity of the portion.


Patent
MetaCure | Date: 2015-08-10

A method of treating a metabolic condition in a patient, comprising:


Patent
MetaCure | Date: 2011-03-23

Gastric apparatus (18), comprising:a set of (a) one or more implantable antral sensors (70, 74), adapted to be coupled to an antral site of an antrum of a stomach (20) of the subject and to generate an antral sensor signal responsive to a property of the antrum, and/or (b) one or more implantable fundic sensors (70, 74), adapted to be coupled to a fundic site of a fundus of the stomach (20) and to generate a fundic sensor signal responsive to a property of the fundus;a set of one or more current-application electrodes (100), adapted to be coupled to a tissue of the subject; anda control unit (90), adapted to:receive and perform an analysis of the antral and/or fundic sensor signals,determine, responsive thereto, a characteristic of a food ingested by the subject, anddrive a current, responsive to the analysis, through the set of current-application electrodes (100) into the tissue.


MetaCure | Entity website

Mission Statement There is a pressing need for better type 2 diabetes treatments capable of addressing the global diabetes pandemic. We are devoted to improving the health and quality of life of hundreds of millions of type 2 diabetes patients by shifting the disease treatment to a clinically and economically effective, one-time, safe and minimally invasive procedure ...


MetaCure | Entity website

Prof. Nicola Scopinaro, FACS (Hon) MD Professor of Surgery, University of Genoa Medical School, Founder, First President, and Honorary President of the Societ Italia di Chirurgia dellObesit e delle malattie metaboliche (SICOB), Founder, First President, and Honorary President of the International Federation for the Surgery of Obesity and Metabolic Disorders (IFSO)


Loading MetaCure collaborators
Loading MetaCure collaborators