Metabolic and Muscular Unit

Firenze, Italy

Metabolic and Muscular Unit

Firenze, Italy
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Buonomo T.,CEINGE Biotecnologie Avanzate | Carraresi L.,Metabolic and Muscular Unit | Rossini M.,University of Siena | Martinelli R.,CEINGE Biotecnologie Avanzate | Martinelli R.,University of Naples Federico II
Journal of Translational Medicine | Year: 2011

Background: Lung cancers consist of four major types that and for clinical-pathological reasons are often divided into two broad categories: small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). All major histological types of lung cancer are associated with smoking, although the association is stronger for SCLC and squamous cell carcinoma than adenocarcinoma. To date, epidemiological studies have identified several environmental, genetic, hormonal and viral factors associated with lung cancer risk. It has been estimated that 15-25% of human cancers may have a viral etiology. The human papillomavirus (HPV) is a proven cause of most human cervical cancers, and might have a role in other malignancies including vulva, skin, oesophagus, head and neck cancer. HPV has also been speculated to have a role in the pathogenesis of lung cancer. To validate the hypothesis of HPV involvement in small cell lung cancer pathogenesis we performed a gene expression profile of transgenic mouse model of SCLC induced by HPV-16 E6/E7 oncoproteins.Methods: Gene expression profile of SCLC has been performed using Agilent whole mouse genome (4 × 44k) representing ~ 41000 genes and mouse transcripts. Samples were obtained from two HPV16-E6/E7 transgenic mouse models and from littermate's normal lung. Data analyses were performed using GeneSpring 10 and the functional classification of deregulated genes was performed using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (Ingenuity®Systems, http://www.ingenuity.com).Results: Analysis of deregulated genes induced by the expression of E6/E7 oncoproteins supports the hypothesis of a linkage between HPV infection and SCLC development. As a matter of fact, comparison of deregulated genes in our system and those in human SCLC showed that many of them are located in the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Signal transduction pathway.Conclusions: In this study, the global gene expression of transgenic mouse model of SCLC induced by HPV-16 E6/E7 oncoproteins led us to identification of several genes involved in SCLC tumor development. Furthermore, our study reveled that the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Signaling is the primarily affected pathway by the E6/E7 oncoproteins expression and that this pathway is also deregulated in human SCLC. Our results provide the basis for the development of new therapeutic approaches against human SCLC. © 2011 Buonomo et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Filoni C.,Metabolic and Muscular Unit | Caciotti A.,Metabolic and Muscular Unit | Carraresi L.,Metabolic and Muscular Unit | Cavicchi C.,Metabolic and Muscular Unit | And 11 more authors.
Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Molecular Basis of Disease | Year: 2010

Fabry Disease (FD) is an X-linked multisystemic lysosomal disorder caused by mutations of α-galactosidase (GLA) gene. Only a few of the 450 genetic lesions identified so far have been characterised by in vitro expression studies. Thus the significance of newly identified GLA nucleotide variants in FD patients which lead to α-galactosidase (GAL-A) amino acid substitutions or intronic changes can be uncertain. We identified three GLA mutations, c.155G > A (p.C52Y), c.548G > C (p.G183A), c.647A > G (p.Y216C) in as many individuals (two male; one female) and performed in vitro expression studies and Western blot analysis in order to clarify their functional effects. Reduced GAL-A activity and normal or partially reduced mutant proteins were present in all overexpressed mutant systems in which three-dimensional structural analysis showed that the active site was not directly involved. We hypothesize that the three new mutations affect the GAL-A protein, leading to conformational FD. When mutant proteins overexpressed in COS-1 cells and in patients' lymphocytes were tested in the presence of the 1-deoxygalactonojirimicin (DGJ) chaperone, the p.G183A and p.Y216C systems showed increased GAL-A enzyme activities and protein stabilisation while p.C52Y was not responsive. We underline that genetic, biochemical and functional studies are helpful in clarifying the consequences of the missense genetic lesions detected in FD. ERT is the elective therapy for Fabry patients, but it is not always possible to issue the enzyme's active form in all involved organs. Our study endorses the hypothesis that an active site-specific chemical chaperone, which could be administered orally, might be effective in treating GAL-A conformational defects. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Ferri L.,University of Florence | Ferri L.,Metabolic and Muscular Unit | Gori A.,University of Florence | Biondi E.G.,University of Florence | And 2 more authors.
Plasmid | Year: 2010

Although horizontal gene transfer mediated by plasmids is important to the generation of the genetic variability of Sinorhizobium strains, the barriers which can reduce horizontal gene transfer between bacteria have not yet been studied in Sinorhizobium. We studied the plasmid transfer by electroporation and its restriction in strains of Sinorhizobium meliloti and S. medicae. After conditions for electroporation were established, three S. meliloti strains (including the sequenced type strain Rm1021) and two S. medicae strains were electroporated with plasmid DNA extracted from strains of both species. The efficiency of transformation was found to be variable among different strains. The acquisition of plasmid DNA was found to be donor-dependent in S. meliloti strain Rm1021 that prefers self-DNA more than the DNA from other Sinorhizobium strains. All other strains tested did not show a preference for self-DNA. In strain Rm1021, the inactivation of the hsdR gene, coding for a putative type-I restriction enzyme, increased the efficiency of transformation and conjugation with non-self DNA; the transformation capability was again reduced in hsdR mutant when the cloned hsdR gene was expressed from a lac promoter. Phylogenetic analysis of the hsdR gene clearly indicated that this gene was horizontally transferred to strain Rm1021, explaining its absence in the other strains tested. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.


PubMed | Metabolic and Muscular Unit
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Biochimica et biophysica acta | Year: 2010

Fabry Disease (FD) is an X-linked multisystemic lysosomal disorder caused by mutations of alpha-galactosidase (GLA) gene. Only a few of the 450 genetic lesions identified so far have been characterised by in vitro expression studies. Thus the significance of newly identified GLA nucleotide variants in FD patients which lead to alpha-galactosidase (GAL-A) amino acid substitutions or intronic changes can be uncertain. We identified three GLA mutations, c.155G>A (p.C52Y), c.548G>C (p.G183A), c.647A>G (p.Y216C) in as many individuals (two male; one female) and performed in vitro expression studies and Western blot analysis in order to clarify their functional effects. Reduced GAL-A activity and normal or partially reduced mutant proteins were present in all overexpressed mutant systems in which three-dimensional structural analysis showed that the active site was not directly involved. We hypothesize that the three new mutations affect the GAL-A protein, leading to conformational FD. When mutant proteins overexpressed in COS-1 cells and in patients lymphocytes were tested in the presence of the 1-deoxygalactonojirimicin (DGJ) chaperone, the p.G183A and p.Y216C systems showed increased GAL-A enzyme activities and protein stabilisation while p.C52Y was not responsive. We underline that genetic, biochemical and functional studies are helpful in clarifying the consequences of the missense genetic lesions detected in FD. ERT is the elective therapy for Fabry patients, but it is not always possible to issue the enzymes active form in all involved organs. Our study endorses the hypothesis that an active site-specific chemical chaperone, which could be administered orally, might be effective in treating GAL-A conformational defects.

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