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Patent
MET Tech and Secretary | Date: 2013-12-17

The present disclosure relates to a process for synthesis of barium bismuth sulfide nanofibers, having equivalent shielding capacity as lead. The present disclosure also relates to a radiation shielding articles and cosmeceuticals.


Patent
Secretary and MET Tech | Date: 2013-12-16

The present disclosure provides nanoparticles of barium zirconium oxide (BaZrO_(3).BaCO_(3)) and a process for preparation thereof. The present disclosure further provides a coating formulation that chiefly comprises the BaZrO_(3).BaCO_(3 )nanoparticles along with its method of preparation. Still further, the present disclosure provides X-ray retardant articles and an X-ray retardant preparation for topical application.


The present disclosure relates to ceramic fillers and methods for preparing said ceramic fillers. The present disclosure further relates to dielectric resonator, fluoropolymer-ceramic filler compositions and their corresponding laminates along with their respective methods for preparing the same from the ceramic fillers. The present disclosure further provides a dielectric resonator and fluoropolymer-ceramic filler laminates having enhanced dielectric properties. The present disclosure also relates to various microwave applications of such fillers, resonators and laminates including microwave devices and circuits.


Patent
MET Tech and The Secretary | Date: 2013-12-12

The present disclosure is in the field of electrical circuits and particularly to circuits characterized by plural conductive paths supported on a non-conductive substrate. The disclosure relates to ceramic filler compositions and methods for preparing said compositions. Further, the present disclosure discloses fluoropolymer-ceramic filler compositions and their laminates along with their respective methods for preparing the same. Said fluoropolymer-ceramic filler compositions provide for excellent properties for dielectric constant, loss tangent and temperature coefficient of dielectric constant. In addition, electrical substrate materials comprising of a conductive outer layer supported on a thin sheet of insulating material is also disclosed.


Surjith A.,MET Tech | Ratheesh R.,MET Tech
Journal of Alloys and Compounds | Year: 2013

Novel low temperature sinterable high Q ceramic systems ACe 2(MoO4)4 (A = Ba, Sr and Ca) have been prepared through solid state ceramic method. The effect of ionic radii of alkaline earth cations on the structure, microstructure and microwave dielectric properties of these ceramics were studied using powder X-ray diffraction, Laser Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and Vector Network Analyzer. A structural change from monoclinic to tetragonal structure was observed while substituting Sr2+ and Ca2+ cations in place of Ba 2+. The Sr and Ca analogues possess better microwave dielectric properties compared to BaCe2(MoO4)4. All the ceramics were well sintered below 840 °C with dielectric constant in the range 10.2-12.3 together with good quality factor. The SrCe2(MoO 4)4 ceramic exhibits an unloaded quality factor of 6762 at 8.080662 GHz with a temperature coefficient of resonant frequency of -46 ppm/°C while the CaCe2(MoO4)4 ceramic shows an unloaded quality factor of 7549 at 6.928868 GHz and a temperature coefficient of resonant frequency of -44 ppm/°C. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Highly transparent and water soluble nanocomposite of conducting polyaniline wrapped-multiwalled carbon nanotubes (PANI-MWCNTs) was synthesized by in situ chemical polymerization method using sulphonic acid as a dopant. MWCNTs were functionalized prior to their use and then polymerized using ammonium per sulphate as an oxidizing agent. The nanocomposite was subjected for physico-chemical characterization using spectroscopic (UV-vis and FT-IR), FE-SEM and HR-TEM analysis. The UV-vis spectrum of the salt phase (dark green) of the PANI-MWCNTs nanocomposite shows a free carrier tail with increasing absorption at higher wavelength, which confirms the presence of conducting emeraldine salt phase of the polyaniline and is further supported by FT-IR analysis. However, the base form (deep blue) of the nanocomposite shows a sharp peak at 600 nm representing an insulating emeraldine base phase of the polymer. The FE-SEM images show the uniform wrapping/coating of the polyaniline over the functionalized MWCNTs and this is further supported by HR-TEM analysis. The synthesized nanocomposite was then successfully used for the determination of pH of the solution (pH 1-12) and found to be a potential candidate for optical pH sensing. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 99.99K | Year: 2012

A particular need exists for systems to accurately orient mortar gun tubes in the field. Specifically, a system is sought that is compact enough to be man portable and fit on a 60 or 81 mm mortar barrel, capable of withstanding lateral shock up of 3 -15,000G, be able to resolve azimuth and elevation in the 1 to 3 mil range, and settle within 1 minute. In this SBIR program, MET Tech proposes to help meet this need with a system containing an innovative compact high-performance gyroscope, along with suitable linear accelerometer(s). MET Tech has developed a radically new category of inertial sensors (linear and angular accelerometers, gyroscopes, inclinometers and seismometers) called Molecular Electronic Transducers (MET). Unlike other inertial sensors, MET sensors are inherently tolerant of very high shock without compromising performance. They combine the high performance of FOGs with the small size of MEMS sensors, at low cost. In Phase I we will demonstrate feasibility of an azimuth and elevation measurement system meeting program objectives through use of analytical modeling, as well as estimating the performance and cost of a full gun-hardened version. Phase II will develop and fabricate a prototype system, which will be tested for performance and ability to survive a simulated gun-firing. Phase III will be devoted to the development of an optimized mortar control package for integration into munitions selected by the Army.


Grant
Agency: National Science Foundation | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2011

This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I project will develop a robust, facile, and economical process to fabricate microscale electrode assemblies for Molecular Electronic Technology (MET) inertial sensors. These devices sensitively detect motion based on an electrochemical sensing mechanism. Currently, platinum or platinum alloys are used as electrode materials. However, the high cost of platinum is a major cost driver for MET sensors. The new electrode assemblies will comprise a composite structure of glassy carbon electrodes and silicon carbide nitride insulating layers to isolate the electrodes within the multi-layer structure. The proposed process utilizes polymer precursors for both these materials which will be cast in successive layers and fired under proper conditions to create the desired structures. In Phase I, an experimental parametric study will be performed to demonstrate feasibility for the process, partnering with Professor Prakash at The Ohio State University. Phase II will be devoted to fabrication, testing and optimization of electrode assemblies and development of plans for large scale production. Successful completion of the program will result in substantial cost savings for existing MET seismic sensor products, and will enable development of new low cost sensors for automotive navigation and other markets. The broader impact/commercial potential of this project is significant in several aspects. The low-cost electrode assembly to be developed can improve the profitability of MET sensor products across the board. MET Tech's initial product offering is a seismic sensor for oil and gas exploration, with a served available market of $100M/year. The availability of high performance, low cost inertial sensors can also enable new functionality in consumer electronic devices, such as inertial navigation capability in cell phones. Market sectors affected include energy, transportation, civilian and military navigation, and consumer electronics. From a broader technological and scientific perspective, this project will establish the ability to co-fire glassy carbon with an insulating material for the first time, which should enable new classes of composite structures and devices at the micro- and possibly at the nanoscale. Such electrode assemblies could have applications in other systems operating in harsh conditions such as high temperature fuel cells, space applications, corrosive environments in chemical processing, as well as in medical applications since glassy carbon is biocompatible. The program will also foster collaboration between academic and industrial researchers and train students and post-docs in practical applications of microfabrication technology, and create new high-technology jobs.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2011

This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I project will develop a robust, facile, and economical process to fabricate microscale electrode assemblies for Molecular Electronic Technology (MET) inertial sensors. These devices sensitively detect motion based on an electrochemical sensing mechanism. Currently, platinum or platinum alloys are used as electrode materials. However, the high cost of platinum is a major cost driver for MET sensors. The new electrode assemblies will comprise a composite structure of glassy carbon electrodes and silicon carbide nitride insulating layers to isolate the electrodes within the multi-layer structure. The proposed process utilizes polymer precursors for both these materials which will be cast in successive layers and fired under proper conditions to create the desired structures. In Phase I, an experimental parametric study will be performed to demonstrate feasibility for the process, partnering with Professor Prakash at The Ohio State University. Phase II will be devoted to fabrication, testing and optimization of electrode assemblies and development of plans for large scale production. Successful completion of the program will result in substantial cost savings for existing MET seismic sensor products, and will enable development of new low cost sensors for automotive navigation and other markets.

The broader impact/commercial potential of this project is significant in several aspects. The low-cost electrode assembly to be developed can improve the profitability of MET sensor products across the board. MET Techs initial product offering is a seismic sensor for oil and gas exploration, with a served available market of $100M/year. The availability of high performance, low cost inertial sensors can also enable new functionality in consumer electronic devices, such as inertial navigation capability in cell phones. Market sectors affected include energy, transportation, civilian and military navigation, and consumer electronics. From a broader technological and scientific perspective, this project will establish the ability to co-fire glassy carbon with an insulating material for the first time, which should enable new classes of composite structures and devices at the micro- and possibly at the nanoscale. Such electrode assemblies could have applications in other systems operating in harsh conditions such as high temperature fuel cells, space applications, corrosive environments in chemical processing, as well as in medical applications since glassy carbon is biocompatible. The program will also foster collaboration between academic and industrial researchers and train students and post-docs in practical applications of microfabrication technology, and create new high-technology jobs.


This invention provides a new category of inertial sensors (linear and angular accelerometers, gyroscopes, inclinometers and seismometers) called Molecular Electronic Transducers (MET). Unlike other inertial sensors, MET sensors use a liquid electrolyte as their inertial mass. The sensors do not contain any precision mechanical parts or springs, and are relatively simple and inexpensive to manufacture.

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