Mental Health Research Group

Plymouth, United Kingdom

Mental Health Research Group

Plymouth, United Kingdom
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Siahbazi S.,Tehran University of Medical Sciences | Behboudi-Gandevani S.,Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences | Moghaddam-Banaem L.,Tarbiat Modares University | Montazeri A.,Mental Health Research Group
Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research | Year: 2017

Aim: The purpose of study was to assess the effect of zinc sulfate (ZS) supplementation on premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and health-related quality of life (QoL). Methods: This was a double-blind randomized and placebo-controlled trial using the parallel technique conducted between June 2013 and May 2014. A total of 142 women (age, 20-35 years) with PMS were allocated to either the ZS or placebo group. The women in the intervention group received ZS 220-mg capsules (containing 50 mg elemental zinc) from the 16th day of the menstrual cycle to the second day of the next cycle. Data were collected using the Premenstrual Symptoms Screening Tool (PSST) and 12-item Short-Form Health Survey Questionnaire. Result: The prevalence of moderate to severe PMS in the ZS group significantly decreased throughout the study period (9.5% in the first, 6% in the second and 2.6% in the third month of the study, P < 0.001), but in the control placebo group this reduction was seen only in the first month of the study (14.2% in the first, 13.7% in the second and 13.5% in the third month, P = 0.08). Also, ZS improved the PSST component scores throughout the study period. The mean scores of QoL in physical and mental components were significantly improved in the ZS intervention group. However, the differences were statistically significant only 3 months after the intervention. Conclusion: Zinc sulfate, as a simple and inexpensive treatment, was associated with improvement of PMS symptoms and health-related QoL. Additional studies are warranted to confirm these findings. © 2017 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.


Hodge S.,Center for Quality Improvement | Doncaster E.,Center for Quality Improvement | Moniz-Cook E.,University of Hull | Purandare N.,Mental Health Research Group | Orrell M.,University College London
Aging Health | Year: 2013

Aim: To evaluate patients' and carers' experiences of attending UK memory services. Methods: As part of their enrollment in the Memory Services National Accreditation Programme, memory services sent questionnaires to patients and carers about their experiences of attending the service. Results: A total of 298 carers and 280 individuals with dementia from 21 memory services responded. People were very satisfied with the diagnostic processes and staff courtesy; however, there was a lack of written information across a range of key areas. In general, carers were better informed than patients but lacked information on respite care or how to get a carers' assessment. Carers were more likely than patients to feel pressurized into making decisions about treatment. Conclusion: This study provides the first profile of the experiences of patients and carers attending memory services. Although in general they were very satisfied with the care received, more needs to be done to improve the provision of information. © 2013 Future Medicine Ltd.

Loading Mental Health Research Group collaborators
Loading Mental Health Research Group collaborators