Hvidovre, Denmark
Hvidovre, Denmark

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Raballo A.,Mental Health Center Hvidovre
Psychiatria Danubina | Year: 2012

An increasing amount of empirical studies demonstrates that anomalies of self experience (self-disorders) are characteristic of schizophrenia and related spectrum conditions, indicating that self-disorders (SDs) are likely to constitute important vulnerability phenotypes. On a clinical level, SDs are non-psychotic alterations of subjective experience that include disturbances of self-awareness (e.g., fading first-person perspective, waning sense of basic identity, depersonalization and hyperreflectivity), autopsychic disorders (e.g., thought pressure or block, perceptualization of mental stream and spatialization of thoughts), loss of common sense (e.g., perplexity), and existential alterations (e.g., solipsistic grandiosity). Such experiences, define essential aspects of the clinical expressions of schizophrenia lending psychopathological coherence to its spectrum manifestations. Furthermore the experiential nature of SDs makes them amenable to the patient's introspection which can be elicited in the dialogical context of the psychiatric interview with important implication for the therapeutic relation. The aim of this presentation is to illustrate the phenomenological core of these experiential anomalies, emphasizing their topicality for the exploration of vulnerability to schizophrenia spectrum conditions and their coherence with the overall clinical picture. © Medicinska naklada - Zagreb, Croatia.


Baandrup L.,Mental Health Center Glostrup | Ostrup Rasmussen J.,Danish Health and Medicines Authority | Klokker L.,Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospital | Austin S.,Mental Health Center Nordsjaelland | And 10 more authors.
Nordic Journal of Psychiatry | Year: 2016

Background and aim: The Danish Health and Medicines Authority assembled a group of experts to develop a national clinical guideline for patients with schizophrenia and complex mental health needs. Within this context, ten explicit review questions were formulated, covering several identified key issues. Methods: Systematic literature searches were performed stepwise for each review question to identify relevant guidelines, systematic reviews/meta-analyses, and randomized controlled trials. The quality of the body of evidence for each review question was assessed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system. Clinical recommendations were developed on the basis of the evidence, assessment of the risk-benefit ratio, and perceived patient preferences. Results: Based on the identified evidence, a guideline development group (GDG) recommended that the following interventions should be offered routinely: antipsychotic maintenance therapy, family intervention and assertive community treatment. The following interventions should be considered: long-acting injectable antipsychotics, neurocognitive training, social cognitive training, cognitive behavioural therapy for persistent positive and/or negative symptoms, and the combination of cognitive behavioural therapy and motivational interviewing for cannabis and/or central stimulant abuse. SSRI or SNRI add-on treatment for persistent negative symptoms should be used only cautiously. Where no evidence was available, the GDG agreed on a good practice recommendation. Conclusions: The implementation of this guideline in daily clinical practice can facilitate good treatment outcomes within the population of patients with schizophrenia and complex mental health needs. The guideline does not cover all available interventions and should be used in conjunction with other relevant guidelines. © 2015 Taylor & Francis.


Koefoed P.,Copenhagen University | Koefoed P.,Rigshospitalet | Woldbye D.P.D.,Copenhagen University | Woldbye D.P.D.,Rigshospitalet | And 26 more authors.
Acta Neuropsychiatrica | Year: 2012

Objective: There is clear evidence of a genetic component in major depression, and several studies indicate that neuropeptide Y (NPY) could play an important role in the pathophysiology of the disease. A well-known polymorphism encoding the substitution of leucine to proline in the signal peptide sequence of NPY (Leu7Pro variation) was previously found to protect against depression. Our study aimed at replicating this association in a large Danish population with major depression. Method: Leu7Pro was studied in a sample of depressed patients and ethnically matched controls, as well as psychiatric disease controls with schizophrenia. Possible functional consequences of Leu7Pro were explored in vitro. Results: In contrast to previous studies, Pro7 appeared to be a risk allele for depression, being significantly more frequent in the depression sample (5.5%, n = 593; p = 0.009; odds ratio, OR: 1.46) as compared to ethnically matched controls (3.8%, n = 2912), while schizophrenia patients (4.1%, n = 503) did not differ. In vitro, the Pro7 substitution appeared to be associated with reduced levels of NPY without affecting its mRNA level. Conclusion: The Leu7Pro variation may increase the risk of major depression, possibly by affecting the biosynthesis of NPY. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.


Herning S.,Mental Health Center Hvidovre
Psychopathology | Year: 2016

Background: Schizophrenia, in phenomenological psychopathology, is often described as a self disturbance and sometimes as a disturbance of the self-world relation. This study seeks to elaborate on these concepts by examining the significance of the Other in relation to these disturbances. Method: Levinas' account of the ‘home' will be employed to interpret the phenomenon of ‘positive withdrawal'. Results: Positive withdrawal can be conceptualized as a means to domesticate the Other, and schizophrenia can be described as an alteration or absence of the normal mode of being at home in the world. Furthermore, the theoretic approach seems to suggest that self- and intersubjective disturbances are intimately related. Conclusions: Further elaboration on the phenomenon of the Other and on his relation to schizophrenic illness might provide phenomenological psychopathology with important insights into the nature of schizophrenia and the way the person with schizophrenia experiences himself, the world and Others. This analysis also suggests that psychotherapy could become more effective by developing methods of making the patient feel more at home in the world with Others, and that these methods might need to address the fundamental conditions upon which the patient communicates with and listens to Others. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel


PubMed | Mental Health Center Hvidovre
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Psychopathology | Year: 2016

Schizophrenia, in phenomenological psychopathology, is often described as a self disturbance and sometimes as a disturbance of the self-world relation. This study seeks to elaborate on these concepts by examining the significance of the Other in relation to these disturbances.Levinas account of the home will be employed to interpret the phenomenon of positive withdrawal.Positive withdrawal can be conceptualized as a means to domesticate the Other, and schizophrenia can be described as an alteration or absence of the normal mode of being at home in the world. Furthermore, the theoretic approach seems to suggest that self- and intersubjective disturbances are intimately related.Further elaboration on the phenomenon of the Other and on his relation to schizophrenic illness might provide phenomenological psychopathology with important insights into the nature of schizophrenia and the way the person with schizophrenia experiences himself, the world and Others. This analysis also suggests that psychotherapy could become more effective by developing methods of making the patient feel more at home in the world with Others, and that these methods might need to address the fundamental conditions upon which the patient communicates with and listens to Others.

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