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SPRINGFIELD, MO--(Marketwired - February 27, 2017) - Spencer Fane is pleased to announce the commencement of construction of the Talia Apartments, a project being developed through a partnership between the Vecino Group, LLC, and the Family Violence Center, a Springfield, Mo. non-profit that provides safety and support for survivors of domestic violence. Shawn Whitney of Spencer Fane worked closely with the Vecino Group to monetize the low income tax credits needed to construct the facility. Financing of such projects with tax credits and other development incentives often involves multiple layers of debt and equity, leading to challenging and time-consuming business, tax and legal issues. The Spencer Fane team leverages its depth of experience and expertise in real estate, finance, government policy, partnership matters and general corporate and not-for-profit law to guide these projects to completion, from deal origination throughout the life of the investment and into disposition. Talia Apartments is the first Missouri Housing Development Commission (MHDC) Low-Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) funded housing project for domestic violence survivors. "We are pleased and humbled to contribute to this project," said Shawn Whitney. "Far too many domestic violence survivors return to their abusers or dangerous situations because they don't have safe and permanent housing. We are confident that Talia Apartments will become a safe haven for women throughout Springfield and central Missouri who are trying to escape dangerous situations." Studies have shown that the odds of domestic violence survivors going back to their abuser are reduced by roughly 50 percent if they are placed in permanent, supportive housing. Talia Apartments offers 46 permanent housing units serving individuals and families. 23 will be reserved for survivors of domestic violence; 23 will be offered as an affordable housing options for others who qualify under special population requirements. This mixture will create an integrated environment for residents, minimizing any stigma associated with living in the community. The apartments will be offered to qualifying residents at affordable rent, set below market value at 30% AMI for special needs-specific units. Rental assistance vouchers will also be available from the Department of Mental Health. The Spencer Fane Tax Credits, Housing and Development Incentives group works with organizations throughout the county through the adaptive reuse of historic buildings, the development of affordable housing and real property investments in distressed areas. Other projects completed by Spencer Fane include Roaster's Block and Hotel Phillips in Kansas City, MO., the Tulsa Club, in Tulsa, Okla., the Hudson Arthaus in Troy, NY., and Faxon School Apartments in Kansas City, Mo. Spencer Fane is a full-service business law firm focused on providing results that move clients and their businesses forward. With direct access to firm leadership and a different approach to client engagement, its attorneys instill confidence and certainty that the clients' interests are the firm's priority. The firm has offices in Colorado Springs and Denver, Colo.; Overland Park, Kan.; Jefferson City, Kansas City, Cape Girardeau, Springfield and St. Louis, Mo.; Omaha, Neb.; Oklahoma City, Okla. and Dallas, Texas. For more information, visit spencerfane.com or follow @spencerfane on Twitter.


News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

In study, children with a particular genetic variation were 4 times more likely to develop strong attachment to mother after intervention Toronto, Canada / Cape Town, South Africa - A child's genetic make-up can play a large, hidden role in the success of efforts to maximize his or her development, South African research suggests. The study, published February 28 in PLoS Medicine and supported by the Government of Canada through Grand Challenges Canada's Saving Brains program, sheds new light on why some children benefit more than others from interventions and raises complex questions about psychosocial intervention programs in future. In a study led by Professor Mark Tomlinson of Stellenbosch University, the study followed-up an intervention implemented between 1999 and 2003, in which expectant mothers underwent mentoring to improve attachment with their children -- attachment being a measure of a child's psychological security, and predictive of future wellbeing. In the original study, a control group of roughly equal size was composed of expectant mothers who did not receive mentoring. The original study concluded that the intervention had a small-to-moderate effect on mother-child attachment, evaluated once the children reached 18 months of age. The follow-up study, conducted thirteen years after the intervention, re-examined the original attachment results and revealed something surprising: the intervention had in fact worked well for toddlers who had a particular genetic characteristic. Conducted in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Reading, University College London, and Western University, the study re-enrolled and conducted genetic tests on 279 of the original 449 children. 220 children had both genetic and attachment data, enabling the investigators to test whether the original attachment outcomes were influenced by their genes. The researchers factored in whether the child had the short or long form of gene SLC6A4 -- the serotonin transporter gene, which is involved in nerve signalling, and which other studies have linked to anxiety, depression and other conditions. Serotonin is popularly thought to contribute to feelings of well-being and happiness. The attachment of children with the short form of the gene, and whose pregnant mothers were mentored, were almost four times more likely to be securely attached to their mothers at 18 months old (84 percent were secure) than children carrying the short form whose mothers did not receive mentoring (58 percent were secure). Meanwhile, children with the long gene were apparently unaffected by their mother's training or lack thereof: in both cases, the rate of secure attachment was almost identical (70 and 71 percent). Subject to further validation, says Professor Tomlinson, the insight has "important implications for scientists designing and evaluating interventions to benefit as many people as possible in South Africa and worldwide." "Without taking genetics into account, it is possible that other studies have under-estimated the impact of their interventions, as we originally did." Says lead author Dr. Barak Morgan of the University of Cape Town: "The immediate significance of this research is the revelation that in principle, and probably in many cases in practice too, the effectiveness of interventions has been mis-measured -- under-estimated for genetically susceptible individuals and over-estimated for those who are genetically less susceptible. But even more worrying is the implication that the negative consequences of not receiving an intervention also differ by genotype." "This is an enormously important insight because, in this case, the subgroup with the short form of the SLC6A4 gene is also the one with the most to lose if not helped." "Individuals with the long form of the gene, on the other hand, appear less sensitive and derived little benefit from the same intervention, and little detriment from not getting it." Adds Professor Tomlinson: "In the original study, we did not see such a big impact from this intervention because only those with the short gene improved, and this improvement was 'diluted' by the large number of children with the long gene who did not improve." The researchers caution that, among other limitations, this study involved a relatively small sample and only measured one gene and one outcome (attachment). Dr. Morgan stressed: "We are certainly not saying that only some people should receive the intervention -- those who are 'susceptible' to improving from it. There is little scientific justification for this. For example, many children with the non-susceptible long genotype of the SLC6A4 gene may carry the susceptible form of another gene which renders them much more likely to benefit from the same intervention but for a different but equally important outcome. "Going forward, the implications are therefore two-fold. Firstly, measuring genetic differences allows for proper assessment of the effectiveness or lack of effectiveness of an intervention for a particular outcome in different individuals. Secondly, this information can then be used to find out how to intervene effectively for all -- to guide what might be done to improve outcomes for a non-responsive gene-intervention interaction while continuing to optimise outcomes for the responsive one." Says Dr. Karlee Silver, Vice President Programs of Grand Challenges Canada: "This work is fundamentally about better understanding the impact of interventions which is an important step forward to creating a world where every child can survive and thrive." Says Dr. Peter A. Singer, Chief Executive Officer of Grand Challenges Canada: "This is a startling finding that changes the way I think about child development. Why is it important? Because child development is the ladder of social mobility used to climb out of the hole of inequity by millions of children around the world." For more information, visit grandchallenges.ca and look for us on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and LinkedIn. Grand Challenges Canada is dedicated to supporting Bold Ideas with Big Impact® in global health. We are funded by the Government of Canada and we support innovators in low- and middle-income countries and Canada. The bold ideas we support integrate science and technology, social and business innovation - we call this Integrated Innovation®. Grand Challenges Canada focuses on innovator-defined challenges through its Stars in Global Health program and on targeted challenges in its Saving Lives at Birth, Saving Brains and Global Mental Health programs. Grand Challenges Canada works closely with Canada's International Development Research Centre (IDRC), the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) and Global Affairs Canada to catalyze scale, sustainability and impact. We have a determined focus on results, and on saving and improving lives. http://www. Saving Brains is a partnership of Grand Challenges Canada, Aga Khan Foundation Canada, the Bernard van Leer Foundation, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, The ELMA Foundation, Grand Challenges Ethiopia, the Maria Cecilia Souto Vidigal Foundation, the Palix Foundation, UBS Optimus Foundation and World Vision Canada. It seeks and supports bold ideas for products, services and implementation models that protect and nurture early brain development relevant to poor, marginalized populations in low- or middle-income countries. http://www.


News Article | February 24, 2017
Site: www.techtimes.com

Depression is not as uncommon as thought and affects more than 4 percent of the global population. The mental condition, if not treated in time may lead to physical and mental disabilities. The World Health Organization (WHO) released some figures pertaining to depression on Thursday, Feb. 23. The figures suggest that depression is now the leading cause of physical and mental disabilities worldwide. "You can see one in 20 people in the world have it and then it has quite a high level of impairment or disability associated with it," said Dan Chisholm, Health System Adviser at WHO,. The report suggests that the ailment affects 2 percent more women - between the ages of 55 and 74 - when compared to men in the same age bracket. It was also observed that women were more susceptible to depression when compared to their male counterparts. A year-long campaign named "Depression: Lets Talk" was conducted by WHO in October 2016, with the purpose of emphasizing the problems associated with depression. The awareness campaign involved three categories of people: young, pregnant and new mothers, as well as the elderly, who comprised the largest group. The campaign report notes that suicide abetted by depression was the second leading cause of death among 15- to 19-year olds globally. It also aimed at creating awareness about post- and pre-natal depression in pregnant women, encouraging them to talk about the same to health officials. The WHO states that around 15 percent of pregnant women tend to suffer from acute depression. The illness was seen more in the elderly as they tend to be isolated from the community with growing age and passage of time. According to the reports, corresponding data reveals that more than 260 million people were affected with anxiety disorders, which accounts for more than 3 percent of the global population. Additionally, in 2015, more than 4 percent of the population was observed to be living with depression. It incurred an 18 percent increase over a period of 10 years. The WHO's Mental Health Gap Action Programme (mhGAP) has been considering cases of depression as a priority. It provides services in countries for people with mental, neurological and substance abuse disorders. These services are provided by health workers. The programme emphasizes on the fact that with proper care and assistance millions of people suffering from mental disorders such as depression can begin leading normal lives. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: www.medicalnewstoday.com

Does the biological clock in cancer cells influence tumour growth? Yes, according to a study conducted by Nicolas Cermakian, Director of the Laboratory of Molecular Chronobiology at the Douglas Mental Health University Institute, one of the research centres of the CIUSSS de l'Ouest-de-l'Île-de-Montréal. Published in the journal BMC Biology, these results show for the first time that directly targeting the biological clock in a cancerous tumour has an impact on its development. Most of the cells in the human body have an internal clock that sets a rhythm for the activities of our organs according to the time of the day. Cancer cells, however, often have a non-functioning or malfunctioning clock. "There were indications suggesting that the malfunctioning clock contributed to rapid tumour growth, but this had never been demonstrated. Thanks to the use of a chemical or a thermic treatment, we succeeded in 'repairing' these cells' clock and restoring it to its normal functioning. In these conditions, tumour growth drops nearly in half", explains Cermakian, a Full Professor in McGill University's Department of Psychiatry. Although this preclinical demonstration was done on mice, this important discovery provides a glimpse of potential new ways to treat cancer in humans. "Activating the biological clock in tumours could become an innovative approach in slowing their growth or that of metastases. This would give people more time to use more conventional treatment modalities, such as surgery or chemotherapy", says Cermakian. It now remains to be shown that we can target the clocks in human tumours the same way." For this study, Silke Kiessling, a postdoctoral fellow on Nicolas Cermakian's team, successfully adjusted the gears of the internal clocks in two types of cancer cells skin and colon to make them function properly. This repair, which was tested in mice and tissue cultures, slowed cancerous tumour growth. After about a week, the tumour treated in this manner was two-thirds smaller than the control tumour. While it is difficult to say at this point what types of cancer might be amenable to such an approach, this new concept could lead to an improvement in human cancer treatment in the long term, the researchers say. This research was funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) and the Fonds de la recherche du Québec-Santé (FRQ-S).


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Does the biological clock in cancer cells influence tumour growth? Yes, according to a study conducted by Nicolas Cermakian, a professor in McGill University's Department of Psychiatry. Published in the journal BMC Biology, these results show for the first time that directly targeting the biological clock in a cancerous tumour has an impact on its development. Most of the cells in the human body have an internal clock that sets a rhythm for the activities of our organs according to the time of the day. Cancer cells, however, often have a non-functioning or malfunctioning clock. "There were indications suggesting that the malfunctioning clock contributed to rapid tumour growth, but this had never been demonstrated. Thanks to the use of a chemical or a thermic treatment, we succeeded in 'repairing' these cells' clock and restoring it to its normal functioning. In these conditions, tumour growth drops nearly in half", explains Cermakian, who is also Director of the Laboratory of Molecular Chronobiology at the Douglas Mental Health University Institute, one of the research centres of the CIUSSS de l'Ouest-de-l'Île-de-Montréal. Although this preclinical demonstration was done on mice, this important discovery provides a glimpse of potential new ways to treat cancer in humans. "Activating the biological clock in tumours could become an innovative approach in slowing their growth or that of metastases. This would give people more time to use more conventional treatment modalities, such as surgery or chemotherapy", says Cermakian. It now remains to be shown that we can target the clocks in human tumours the same way." For this study, Silke Kiessling, a postdoctoral fellow on Nicolas Cermakian's team, successfully adjusted the gears of the internal clocks in two types of cancer cells ? skin and colon ? to make them function properly. This repair, which was tested in mice and tissue cultures, slowed cancerous tumour growth. After about a week, the tumour treated in this manner was two-thirds smaller than the control tumour. While it is difficult to say at this point what types of cancer might be amenable to such an approach, this new concept could lead to an improvement in human cancer treatment in the long term, the researchers say. This research was funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) and the Fonds de la recherche du Québec-Santé (FRQ-S). The article "Enhancing circadian clock function in cancer cells inhibits tumor growth" was published in the journal BMC Biology on February 14, 2017. DOI: 10.1186/s12915-017-0349-7 Nicolas Cermakian (PhD) is the director of the Laboratory of Molecular Chronobiology at the Douglas Mental Health University Institute and a Full Professor at McGill University's Department of Psychiatry. He is currently the president of the Canadian Society for Chronobiology. The work done in his laboratory focuses on maximizing our understanding of "the gears in the biological clock" and their impacts on physiology. He also studies the consequences of dysfunctional clocks on health including psychiatric disorders, infectious diseases and cancer. Silke Kiessling worked as a postdoctoral fellow in the team of Dr. Cermakian. She is currently a researcher at the Technical University of Munich. The Centre intégré universitaire de santé et de services sociaux (CIUSSS) de l'Ouest-de-l'Île-de-Montréal is made up of the CSSS de l'Ouest-de-l'Île, the CSSS de Dorval-Lachine-LaSalle, St. Mary's Hospital, St. Anne's Hospital, Douglas Mental Health University Institute, West Montreal Readaptation Centre, Grace Dart Extended Care Centre, and Batshaw Youth and Family Centres. The Douglas Mental Health University Institute is a world-class institute affiliated with McGill University and the World Health Organization. It treats people suffering from mental illness and offers them both hope and healing. Its teams of specialists and researchers are constantly increasing scientific knowledge, integrating this knowledge into patient care, and sharing it with the community in order to educate the public and eliminate prejudices surrounding mental health.


News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

OC87 Recovery Diaries (oc87recoverydiaries.com) brings attention to curated social media accounts that advocate for mental illness recovery and champion an end to stigma. For many, social media is a place to connect with others, find information, and discover new stories. A robust social presence can contribute to a sense of connection and well-being. Supporting its mission to put an end to stigma and educate people about mental health through storytelling, OC87 Recovery Diaries has created a monthly column dedicated to featuring social media as a place for mental health community and resource that motivates, informs, and cultivates recovering together. The monthly column, appearing on the website every last Monday of the month, is created and written by Leah Alexandra Goldstein, Designer and Website Manager for OC87 Recovery Diaries. In addition to Leah’s design talents, she has been the website contributor on topics of depression and anxiety. Her new column features social media communities that inspire, empower, and educate about mental health. The inaugural post entitled “8 Mental Health Instagram Accounts You Should Know About” features Instagram accounts that promote the spirit of inclusion, compassion, and advocacy. “Social media plays an important role in our lives. It is where we find connections with like-minded people all over the world. We believe that Leah’s column will lead our readers to discover places on social media that can inspire and empower them on a daily basis,” said Gabriel Nathan, Editor in Chief of OC87 Recovery Diaries. OC87 Recovery Diaries’ mission is to bust stigma surrounding mental illness. The website aims to touch as many lives as possible and shed light on the lived experiences of recovery from a mental illness: what matters, what helps, what hurts, and what might be next? Original content is developed by the OC87 Recovery Diaries production team. In addition, the site commissions stories about mental health recovery journeys from those who have lived experiences and a story to tell.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

PALO ALTO, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Thanks to the outstanding philanthropic leadership of an anonymous Palo Alto resident, CHC is moving forward with plans to launch Palo Alto’s first Intensive Outpatient Program (IOP) this spring, filling a critical gap in teen mental health services. The IOP, located on CHC’s campus, will address the needs of teens between the ages of 14-18 with significant anxiety, depression, and/or suicidal thoughts. “We are in the perfect place to do this, we have the qualified staff to do it, and now, thanks to a generous lead donor, we can move forward right away, knowing that it will be accessible and affordable to all teens, regardless of financial capacity,” said CHC’s Executive Director, Dr. Rosalie Whitlock. After a recent qualitative study revealed a significant need for a Palo Alto-based intensive after school therapy program for teens, CHC was driven to add an IOP to its robust web of support for at-risk teens. It is a natural extension of CHC’s comprehensive continuum of care and overall commitment to helping local youth realize their promise and potential. “It was time to listen to our community by creating a local resource that can meet the mental health needs of our struggling teens,” said Dr. Ramsey Khasho, Director of The Center at CHC. CHC’s skilled adolescent psychiatrists and expert teen therapists will allow for seamless transitions between the IOP and less intensive outpatient therapy services. “CHC is a natural home for an IOP because we have appropriate space, knowledge and skill sets along with the passion and heart for the community and our teens,” said Dr. Lynette Hsu, Head of Adolescent Mental Health Services at CHC. CHC’s twelve-week IOP will be able to accommodate up to eight teens at a time and will be offered on a rolling basis, four days/week during after-school hours, enabling teens to maintain their daily school routines. The IOP’s therapeutic multimodal approach includes evidence-based interventions including Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT)—considered the IOP gold standard for psychological treatment of mental health disorders—and Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT), as well as best practices in mindfulness. Seasoned, licensed clinicians trained through the Linehan Institute (founded by Marsha Linehan, Ph.D., the developer of DBT therapies), will provide individual, group, and family therapy; psychiatry with medication management; an academic skills component; mindfulness training (physical, art, nutrition); and parent and multi-family skill groups. Those who will benefit most from CHC’s IOP include teens with moderate to severe symptoms of anxiety or depression; self-harm behaviors (i.e. cutting); suicidal thoughts with or without plans; significant decrease in functioning at school and at home (i.e. sharp decline in grades, missing school); and those for whom weekly outpatient therapy is not effective for symptom reduction and improved functioning. The program covers the often overlooked but essential middle ground between weekly outpatient therapy and hospitalization, and provides transition support between the two. The program also provides a critical step-down service for teens discharged and returning from psychiatric inpatient stays. Because teen anxiety and depression symptoms are not clear-cut and many parents may not know what level of help their teen needs, CHC is also expanding its free 30-minute expert consultation service. “We want to offer clarity and comfort during what can be a scary and confusing time for parents,” said Dr. Khasho. Parents are encouraged to call, even if they aren’t certain whether their teen is exhibiting typical adolescent behavior or warning signs of something more serious. Connecting those in need with those who can help is the cornerstone of CHC’s Teen Mental Health Initiative (TMHI) of which the IOP will be an integral part. TMHI also aims to remove stigma, raise awareness and reduce teen suicide through accessible, affordable and compassionate teen therapy; community education; and community engagement. “Teen mental health is not an issue that can be tackled by CHC alone,” said Dr. Whitlock. “In order to make a lasting impact, we need to educate ourselves and each other, leverage strengths and partnerships, and involve all stakeholders—from teens and teachers to parents and government officials.” On this front, CHC has incorporated 12 new teen-focused classes into its free community education program (link); launched a Teen Mental Health Committee, made up of local teens who want to use their voices to reduce stigma and advocate change; partnered with Stanford to develop a Teen Mental Health Leadership Collaborative of local leaders of various stakeholder groups to leverage the community’s collective strengths and make advancements in the Bay Area teen mental health system of care; and hosts regular gatherings with local school counselors and wellness coordinators to understand and address unmet mental health needs at the school and district level. A complex problem deserves a comprehensive solution, and a changing landscape requires a nimble strategy. “We are not interested in a band-aid fix,” said Dr. Khasho. “We won’t rest until we see meaningful and lasting results.” In addition to CHC’s award-winning education and mental healthcare services, CHC has long been a community resource. On March 16th, CHC will host its annual community breakfast featuring guest speakers Nancy Lublin, Founder and CEO of the acclaimed Crisis Text Line, the 24-hour crisis intervention service delivered via text; Jayne Apple, WNBA Star and founder of Bring Change 2 Mind, a non-profit working to end the stigma and discrimination surrounding mental illness; James B. Everitt, EdD, Director, Office of Mission Initiatives & Institutional Planning for Sacred Heart Schools, which oversees the School’s health and wellness efforts; and Ramsey Khasho, PsyD, CHC Director of The Center & Director of Clinical Services, Sand Hill School. Over the next year CHC will continue to bring the community together through education, expert panels, breakfast meetings and other events to highlight the various needs of teens. Ongoing developments and details about the CHC Teen Mental Health Initiative and the new IOP may be found at www.chconline.org. To schedule a free 30 minute consultation or an appointment for services call 650.688.3625 or email help@chconline.org. CHC is a nonprofit agency that has been serving children, youth, teens and young adults in San Mateo and Santa Clara Counties as well as the greater San Francisco Bay Area for nearly 65 years. The CHC Teen Mental Health Initiative expands affordable teen therapy, mental health education, and community leadership and engagement directly, and through community collaborations, to help reduce teen anxiety and depression, and prevent teen suicide. The goal of the agency is to remove barriers to learning regardless of language, location, learning style or ability to pay. The agency specializes in Anxiety & Depression, ADHD, Learning Differences, and Autism with The Center, two schools, Community Clinic and Community Education. www.chconline.org


News Article | February 18, 2017
Site: www.PR.com

CCHR Nashville Lifts Up the Mental Health Declaration of Human Rights The Nashville chapter of Citizens Commission on Human Rights works to expose abuse in the field of mental health. Nashville, TN, February 18, 2017 --( CCHR is a nonprofit mental health watchdog, responsible for helping to enact more than 150 laws protecting individuals from abusive or coercive practices. CCHR has long fought to restore basic inalienable human rights to the field of mental health, including, but not limited to, full informed consent regarding the medical legitimacy of psychiatric diagnosis, the risks of psychiatric treatments, the right to all available medical alternatives and the right to refuse any treatment considered harmful. CCHR was co-founded in 1969 by the Church of Scientology and Professor of Psychiatry Emeritus Dr. Thomas Szasz at a time when patients were being warehoused in institutions and stripped of all constitutional, civil and human rights. With recent international headlines warning populations of the dangers of psychotropic drugs, and resultant loss in sales, psychiatrists are shifting focus and regressing to electroshock treatment. Wrapped in a new package and renamed “deep brain stimulation,” this controversial procedure has been touted as safe without sufficient evidence to back that claim. CCHR Nashville reminds citizens that the Mental Health Declaration of Human Rights as proffered by CCHR International includes “the right to accept or refuse treatment but in particular, the right to refuse sterilization, electroshock treatment, insulin shock, lobotomy,” and a host of other sordid modes of mental manipulation. The Declaration contains over thirty rights, such as “the right to discharge oneself at any time and to be discharged without restriction, having committed no offense.” CCHR Nashville urges citizens to adopt the Mental Health Declaration and give it the force of law in their community and state. For further information, visit cchr.org. Read the Declaration at cchr.org/about-us/mental-health-declaration-of-human-rights.html. Nashville, TN, February 18, 2017 --( PR.com )-- Volunteers for the Nashville chapter of Citizens Commission on Human Rights are working to raise public awareness of the Mental Health Declaration of Human Rights.CCHR is a nonprofit mental health watchdog, responsible for helping to enact more than 150 laws protecting individuals from abusive or coercive practices. CCHR has long fought to restore basic inalienable human rights to the field of mental health, including, but not limited to, full informed consent regarding the medical legitimacy of psychiatric diagnosis, the risks of psychiatric treatments, the right to all available medical alternatives and the right to refuse any treatment considered harmful.CCHR was co-founded in 1969 by the Church of Scientology and Professor of Psychiatry Emeritus Dr. Thomas Szasz at a time when patients were being warehoused in institutions and stripped of all constitutional, civil and human rights.With recent international headlines warning populations of the dangers of psychotropic drugs, and resultant loss in sales, psychiatrists are shifting focus and regressing to electroshock treatment. Wrapped in a new package and renamed “deep brain stimulation,” this controversial procedure has been touted as safe without sufficient evidence to back that claim.CCHR Nashville reminds citizens that the Mental Health Declaration of Human Rights as proffered by CCHR International includes “the right to accept or refuse treatment but in particular, the right to refuse sterilization, electroshock treatment, insulin shock, lobotomy,” and a host of other sordid modes of mental manipulation. The Declaration contains over thirty rights, such as “the right to discharge oneself at any time and to be discharged without restriction, having committed no offense.”CCHR Nashville urges citizens to adopt the Mental Health Declaration and give it the force of law in their community and state. For further information, visit cchr.org. Read the Declaration at cchr.org/about-us/mental-health-declaration-of-human-rights.html. Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from CCHR Nashville


News Article | February 22, 2017
Site: www.PR.com

Debbie Scheer to perform at 2nd Annual Mental Health Art Benefit on March 11, 2017. Denver, CO, February 22, 2017 --( Debbie’s comedic perspective can get a laugh out of anybody. She is “dedicated to her laugh-craft” and she shines in her performance. She creates an inclusive space for her audience to let down their guard and approaches difficult subjects with education and humor. Debbie is a passionate community member as well. She is the Co-Creator of “Broadsided: An Estrogen Fueled Comedy Show” which empowers and educates women on topics relevant to their lives. Debbie is excited to perform for this special fundraiser for Mental Health Colorado as it holds a special place in her life. Debbie lives in Colorado with her two young boys, and can be seen performing at Comedy Works South, the Improv Comedy Club in Tempe AZ, Voodoo Comedy Playhouse, Lannie’s Clocktower, Blush and Blue, Crossroads Theater, Colorado Pride Festival and many other fantastic places. She will perform at MHAB2017 on March 11, 2017 at Regis University, at 3333 Regis Boulevard in Denver. Tickets on sale at www.mhab2017.com About Empowered Partnerships Empowered Partnerships is a woman owned recruiting outsourcing and consulting firm located in Colorado, solely focused on working with the Mental & Behavioral health industry nationally. For more information, contact Ashley Lane Boyle at alboyle@empowered-partnerships.com Contact: Ashley Lane Boyle Empowered Partnerships Voice Phone Number: (720) 541-9678 Email Address: alboyle@empowered-partnerships.com www.empowered-partnerships.com www.mhab2017.com Denver, CO, February 22, 2017 --( PR.com )-- Empowered Partnerships is excited to announce that Debbie Shcheer, a local Colorado Comedian, to perform at the 2nd Annual Mental Health Art Benefit hosted at Regis University and supporting Mental Health Colorado.Debbie’s comedic perspective can get a laugh out of anybody. She is “dedicated to her laugh-craft” and she shines in her performance. She creates an inclusive space for her audience to let down their guard and approaches difficult subjects with education and humor.Debbie is a passionate community member as well. She is the Co-Creator of “Broadsided: An Estrogen Fueled Comedy Show” which empowers and educates women on topics relevant to their lives. Debbie is excited to perform for this special fundraiser for Mental Health Colorado as it holds a special place in her life.Debbie lives in Colorado with her two young boys, and can be seen performing at Comedy Works South, the Improv Comedy Club in Tempe AZ, Voodoo Comedy Playhouse, Lannie’s Clocktower, Blush and Blue, Crossroads Theater, Colorado Pride Festival and many other fantastic places.She will perform at MHAB2017 on March 11, 2017 at Regis University, at 3333 Regis Boulevard in Denver. Tickets on sale at www.mhab2017.comAbout Empowered PartnershipsEmpowered Partnerships is a woman owned recruiting outsourcing and consulting firm located in Colorado, solely focused on working with the Mental & Behavioral health industry nationally.For more information, contact Ashley Lane Boyle at alboyle@empowered-partnerships.comContact:Ashley Lane BoyleEmpowered PartnershipsVoice Phone Number: (720) 541-9678Email Address: alboyle@empowered-partnerships.comwww.empowered-partnerships.comwww.mhab2017.com Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from Empowered Partnerships, LLC


News Article | March 1, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

UR2.Global names 5-time Grammy award winning musician, composer, writer, and producer Pablo Stennett, as its 2017 Honorary Artist-in-Residence for its humanitarian project which showcases the ARTS to uplift the self-esteem of humanity. UR2.Global is a psycho-spiritual arts project of The Sacretherapy Institute (pronounced sacred-therapy with a silent "d") with global liaisons on five continents. "UR2" means "you are too" a valuable worthy being! This year's honorary artist was selected as a result of the amazing song he produced and co-wrote for the world titled: We Are Tomorrow. A song that aligns with the essence of what the UR2.Global Self-esteem Project is all about - instilling within mankind inspiration, hope and the ability to believe in oneself. Pablo's ability to capture that spirited message and worldview may be credited to having been deeply rooted in the church, where his father was a pastor. He began studying piano at the age of five and ultimately added bass, upright bass, and guitar to his arsenal of instruments. He tours globally with Ziggy Marley (son of the late Bob Marley), playing music that is redemptive in nature with an artist who states "love is his religion." Pablo has also worked with a multitude of superstar artists, including Willie Nelson, Jimmy Cliff, Chaka Khan, Pink, and Raphael Saadiq, to name a few, and has partnered with film studios, theater organizations, media organizations, corporations, and digital entertainment clients, including Sony Playstation. Pablo's term as the Honorary Artist-in-Residence will begin March 20, 2017 - Feb 28, 2018. He states he was attracted to the UR2.Global Self-Esteem project because “When your self-esteem is at a high vibration, and when you’re feeling positive beyond measure, you are unstoppable! Your positive energy radiates and transcends, causing a ripple effect that touches humanity in a way that can uplift the world! Music has a way of bringing people together, uplifting one another and creating positive vibes!" "We are so honored to be working with such a highly spirited and seasoned artist," states President and Co-Founder - Amelia Kemp, Ph.D., LMHC, who is a singer/songwriter honored as an 'Artist for Peace' by Gandhi's BE Magazine and is a licensed psychotherapist with a non-secular doctorate in Metaphysical Theology, and master's degree in Mental Health Counseling. Dr. Kemp states, "In a celebrity-crazed society where many believe that only the famous and rich have value, its so meaningful when musicians like Pablo reach out to the masses of artists who also have much to offer the world." Pablo has kindly commissioned UR2.Global with one of his instrumental songs titled: The Promise, for what is being named the UR2.Global Pablo Stennett Artists Challenge. Singer/songwriters, dancers, poets, and those who do "spoken word" are allowed to use his song as the background music to their artistic creation that must promote self-esteem, self-love and self-confidence. Music videos are also welcomed. All entries will be showcased on the UR2.Global site and every entry will receive an award. Lamarr Kemp, Sr., MBA - Vice President of UR2.Global states, "I hope artists take advantage of this opportunity to create with an artist at this level of accomplishment who understands that everyone is equal and has talent." Pablo not only demonstrates this premise through his work as an artist, but also by developing artists where he is renowned for identifying and cultivating talent, having served as a trusted partner and liaison for high-profile stakeholders in music, entertainment, and commercial fields. So those who enter the Pablo Stennett Artists Challenge have a chance of having this multi-Grammy winner, producer, and talent developer listen to their work. Complete submission guidelines may be found on the website at UR2.Global and the title of your entry should include the word "Promise", such as "The Promise of Self-esteem" or "The Promise to Love Ourselves", etc. Those titles are just examples that may be used but the artists' creativity for their choice of title is endless. All age artists are welcomed to participate, starting from students in high school planning to pursue arts careers, to college students pursuing arts careers, to professional artists, to retired senior citizens who thought it was too late. The deadline for Spring submissions is June 30th and the deadline for Autumn submissions is November 1, 2017. The Sacretherapy Institute's UR2.Global Self-esteem Project features music therapies, psychodramas, visual arts, and literary arts of all genres for the upliftment of mankind and also reviews and showcases the works of popular artists who also inspire the world. The Sacretherapy Institute was created as a result of Dr. Kemp's book titled: From Psychotherapy to Sacretherapy which she also wrote to uplift humanity after having been a psychotherapist for 20 years. During which time, she was dismayed by the number of people in the world that didn't see their innate value and worth. Therefore, with her also being a singer/songwriter she recalled how uplifting her use of music and psychodrama had been therapeutically, and decided to merge music with healing by performing and using the stage name: Dr. K's Music Therapy. As such, UR2.Global is the culmination of this merger with all the ARTS and the Institute's desire to uplift the self-esteem of humanity globally. For more information visit http://www.UR2.Global or contact Linda Thrasher at UR2.Global@gmail.com.

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