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News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

NEW YORK, May 11, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- May is Mental Health Month, so UFC 205 Winner, former UFC lightweight champion and future Hall of Famer Frankie “The Answer” Edgar and his company Move+Sportswear teamed with YourUpdateTV and D S Simon Media to champion The Feeling Brain, the world's first neuroscience education on the interdependence of brain function, emotion, behavior and health! A video accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/b61879fa-d348-41b4-8a75-e85019a84794 A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/af3bfa3a-cc5d-48e1-baaf-74541060b7b8 For more information and access to other media materials please visit: https://www.movesportswear.com/pressroom/ Before he steps into the Octagon May 13th at UFC 211 in Dallas, Texas, VP of apparel brand Move+Sportswear, MMA world champion fighter Frankie Edgar, his business partners and team including WSOF fighter Marlon Moraes, elite boxing coach Mark Henry, and Nick Catone MMA urge everyone to join them in this fight for better mental health training for physicians and their patients. “Go to Movesportswear.com to help us advance medicine one t-shirt at a time. Proceeds support The Feeling Brain series - critical education for doctors and patients on brain function and emotion. Post your selfie wearing it. Let’s move positive together,” says Move+Sportswear CEO and co-founder, Russ Terlecki. Nearly 450 million people suffer with depression, anxiety and other emotional conditions – a staggering figure spanning race, culture, socioeconomics, generations, and genders alike. Most families struggle in some way. Doctors aren't trained to effectively treat a global mental health crisis of epidemic proportions. Why? No medical education exists on the neural basis of emotion – until now. The Feeling Brain shows the direct relationship between brain circuitry and structure and treatable medical conditions. Mental health needn’t be a silent battle for doctors and their patients. Frankie Edgar affirms, “If a doctor doesn’t have the know-how or resources, they’re not going to be able to help their patients. “The Feeling Brain” provides doctors with important education, and is a perfect fit for Move+Sportswear. We want to move positive, and what’s more positive than giving our doctors all the information they need to help people with mental and emotional health.” A collaborative effort of neuroscientists, medical and media experts, “The Feeling Brain: Exploring the Neural Basis of Emotion” fills a void in medical education to advance more effective resources for doctors and patients worldwide. Neuroscientist David Edelman, PhD, Dartmouth College and Chief Science Officer of MedNeuro says, “Emotion is a critical aspect of every variety of higher brain function that you can imagine. Anxiety, depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, PTSD and other emotional conditions are no less physiological than chronic disease such as cancer or diabetes, and all happen in this object we call the brain.” “If you look in the emergency departments in the United States, most people who come in with emotional or disruptive behavior, there’s no place to send them. There’s not a staff psychiatrist, no psychiatric holding bed. We want to provide materials for the hundreds of thousands of physicians who end up treating patients with mental and emotional conditions because there’s not enough trained professionals to do it in the first place,” says Bob Sweeney, DS MA, Executive Director of Challenger Corp and Chief Strategic Advisor/CFO of MedNeuro. “We will provide materials not just for psychiatrists and neurologists, but for the hundreds of thousands of physicians, and millions of nurses who treat patients with mental illness every day.” According to recognized authority on patient-centered health care and public policy, Dr. Hassan Tetteh, “For years, I have promoted the importance of mental health in achieving 'total' health. However, the tools currently available to the average practitioner to treat patients with emotional conditions are limited. Thus, The Feeling Brain education initiative is of particular interest.” Dr. Tetteh is a board-certified surgeon specializing in thoracic surgery, critical care, and heart and lung transplantation at MedStar Health and Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. “I’m a fighter. I have to train with the best coach, the best equipment; our doctors need the same. They have to be trained by the best,” says former WSOF champion Marlon Moraes, who makes his UFC debut in June’s UFC 212. It’s our mission as a company to become a world leader in athletic sportswear with positive messages emphasized on and off our sports apparel. Move+Sportswear’s “Move+ment” Program creates positive energy in sports and education globally, and supports the advancement of mental health care. To learn more about this breakthrough education initiative, visit TheFeelingBrain.org. About Move+Sportswear Co-founders, Russ Terlecki and Steve Rivera, also owner of Elite Wrestling Clubs, launched Move+Sportswear with Frankie Edgar to support proper education on and off the fields. Terlecki and Rivera were college teammates and NCAA All American wrestlers. Rivera was childhood Frankie’s wrestling coach. Emphasis on respect and honor, growth of self-esteem and encouragement of healthy competition are cornerstones of their company’s philosophy. To join them in moving positive for mental healthcare, go to Movesportswear.com. About Frankie Edgar UFC 205 Winner at Madison Square Garden in New York City, former UFC lightweight champion and future Hall of Famer, Frankie “The Answer” Edgar is the current No. 2 featherweight in the world. The New Jersey native trains with his Iron Army team, Renzo Gracie, Ricardo Almeida and Nick Catone, MMA. Frankie is coming off a unanimous decision win over Jeremy Stephens at UFC 205 in November. A top contender in the UFC for 10 years (21-5-1 MMA, 15-5-1 UFC), Edgar will be taking on rising prospect and ninth-ranked featherweight Yair Rodgriguez at UFC on May 13th in Dallas, Texas. About Move+Sportswear Frankie Edgar is Vice President of Move+Sportswear. The company’s “Move+ment” Program supports and spreads positivity in the sports world and in education, to create positive energy and movement globally. Support of proper education on and off the fields, emphasis on respect and honor, growth of self-esteem and encouragement of healthy competition are cornerstones of Move+Sportswear’s philosophy as we present our quality sportswear brand to the public. About MedNeuro and The Feeling Brain Breakthrough neuroscience education and pioneering clinical content for primary care physicians and medical professionals. Our focus is the emotional component of mental health – which is largely overlooked – and fills a huge gap in evidence-based science education. The Feeling Brain: Exploring the Neural Basis of Emotion is the first Visual CME course that shows in a scientific fashion the direct relationship between brain circuitry and structure and treatable medical conditions. Our total health strategy communicates breakthrough evidence-based findings for medical professionals, higher learning systems, point-of-care networks, and the general public for maximum impact. About YourUpdateTV  YourUpdateTV is a social media video portal for organizations to share their content, produced by award-winning video communications firm, D S Simon Media (http://www.dssimon.com). It includes separate channels for Health and Wellness, Lifestyle, Media and Entertainment, Money and Finance, Social Responsibility, Sports and Technology.


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

CLEARWATER, Fla., May 11, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- The Citizens Commission on Human Rights (CCHR), a non-profit mental health watchdog co-founded by the Church of Scientology in 1969, working with its Florida chapter, formally requested that Dr. Stephen Ostroff, M.D., Acting Commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA),  ban the electroshock device. According to the FDA, ECT may cause: prolonged or delayed onset seizures, cardiovascular complications (including heart attacks), breathing complications, confusion, permanent memory loss, brain damage and death.i CCHR noted in its request that despite the dangers an estimated 100,000 Americans receive electroshock annually including children, the elderly and pregnant women. The only state in the country to issue an annual ECT report is Texas where in 2014 six deaths were reported following the use of electroshockii.  CCHR has now filed Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests to the remaining U.S. states for the purpose of obtaining statistics on how many children and others are receiving ECT. These FOIA requests revealed that in one state alone, Utah, electroshock was administered 50 times to children and adolescents up to the age of 17 in recent years—including 15 times to those five years old or younger and that Tricare military insurance reported seven children aged 0 to 17 were given ECT in 2016.iii “We have found that visitors to our headquarters in downtown Clearwater are under the assumption that ECT is no longer used or even banned,” said Diane Stein, President CCHR Florida. “This mistaken belief is why our chapter decided to join CCHR International’s petition to ban the ECT device.” In actuality only four U.S. states—Colorado, California, Tennessee and Texas—have banned the use of ECT in children and adolescents despite the fact that the World Health Organization's Resource Book on Mental Health, Human Rights and Legislation, recommended in 2005: "There are no indications for the use of ECT on minors, and hence this should be prohibited through legislation."iv For more information on electroconvulsive therapy or to report harmful side effects from the administration of ECT please fill out this form or contact CCHR at 1-800-869-2247. About CCHR: Initially established by the Church of Scientology and renowned psychiatrist Dr. Thomas Szasz in 1969, CCHR’s mission is to eradicate abuses committed under the guise of mental health and enact patient and consumer protections.  It was L. Ron Hubbard, the founder of Scientology, who brought the terror of psychiatric imprisonment to the notice of the world.  In March 1969, he said, “Thousands and thousands are seized without process of law, every week, over the ‘free world’ tortured, castrated, killed.  All in the name of ‘mental health.’” For more information visit, www.cchrflorida.org. i Neurological Devices Panel, Center for Devices and Radiological Health Medical Devices Advisory Committee, Food and Drug Administration, pp 148-149, 27 Jan. 2011,  https://www.fda.gov/downloads/AdvisoryCommittees/CommitteesMeetingMaterials/MedicalDevicesAdvisoryCommittee/neurologicalDevicesPanel/UCM247594.pdf.%20Accessed%20December%20 "Electroconvulsive Therapy (ECT) Devices for Class II Intended Uses," Draft Guidance for Industry, Clinicians and Food and Drug Administration Staff, 29 Dec. 2015, https://www.fda.gov/downloads/MedicalDevices/%E2%80%A6/UCM478942.pdf ii Jonathon Emord & Associates, Citizens Petition filed with the FDA Commissioner, 14 Aug. 2016; citing Texas Department of State Health Services. Electroconvulsive Therapy (ECT) Reports. FY 2014 ECT Annual Report, page 1. http://www.dshs.texas.gov/mhsa/bhmd/ect/ iii "Evidence for Use of Electroshock on Veterans," 24 July 2015,  https://talkwithtenney.wordpress.com/2015/07/24/evidence-for-use-of-electroshock-on-veterans/ iv Benedetto Saraceno, MD, "WHO Resource Book on Mental Health, Human Rights and Legislation Who 2005," p. 64.


News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Fathers who interact more with their children in their first few months of life could have a positive impact on their baby's cognitive development. In a study, published in the Infant Mental Health Journal, researchers from Imperial College London, King's College London and Oxford University looked at how fathers interacted with their babies at three months of age and measured the infants' cognitive development more than a year later. They found that babies whose fathers were more engaged and active when playing with them in their initial months performed better in cognitive tests at two years of age. The researchers say that while a number of factors are critical in a child's development, the relatively unexplored link between quality father-infant interactions at a young age may be an important one. Professor Paul Ramchandani, from the Department of Medicine at Imperial and who led the research, said: "Even as early as three months, these father-child interactions can positively predict cognitive development almost two years later, so there's something probably quite meaningful for later development, and that really hasn't been shown much before." In the study, researchers recorded video of parents interacting with their children, with mothers and fathers playing with their babies without toys, at three months, and then during a book-reading session at two years of age. The videos were then observed independently by trained researchers, with different researchers at three months and 24 months grading the fathers on their interactions. At two years of age, they scored the baby's cognitive development using the standardised Bayley mental development index (MDI) - which involved tasks such as recognising colours and shapes. After analysing data for 128 fathers, and accounting for factors such as their income and age, they found a positive correlation between the degree to which dads engaged with their babies and how the children scored on the tests. Dads with more positive outlooks were also more likely to have babies who performed better on the MDI scales. What's more, the positive link between involved dads and higher infant MDI scores were seen equally whether the child was a boy or a girl, countering the idea that play time with dad is more important for boys than girls, at an early age. Dr Vaheshta Sethna from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) at King's College London, said: "We also found that children interacting with sensitive, calm and less anxious fathers during a book session at the age of two showed better cognitive development, including attention, problem-solving, language and social skills. This suggests that reading activities and educational references may support cognitive and learning development in these children." Dr Sethna added: "Our findings highlight the importance of supporting fathers to interact more positively with their children in early infancy. Specifically, considering interventions which encourage increased father-infant engagement with shared positive emotions, and book sharing sessions supportive of cognitive development." While the study provides a window into the effects of dad's involvement with baby, there were a number of limitations. Parents recruited to the study were drawn from a relatively well educated population. In addition, the measure of interactions were taken from relatively short videos, so may not represent how they interact in other situations. The researchers are now working on a trial based on helping parents with their interactions with their children and then giving them positive feedback to help them deal with challenging behaviour. Professor Ramchandani concluded: "For those fathers who are more engaged it may be that there is a lot more positive stuff going on in their lives generally. That might be the reason for the link, but we can't be sure of that. All we can say is that there is a signal here, and it seems to be an important one. "The clear message for new fathers here is to get stuck in and play with your baby. Even when they're really young playing and interacting with them can have a positive effect." 'Father-child interactions at 3 months and 24 months: contributions to children's cognitive development at 24 months' by Sethna V, et al. is published in the Infant Mental Health Journal.


-- Experts on health and hunger from across the state, as well as state and local leaders will come together to search for solutions during Feeding Wisconsin's second annual Hunger and Health Summit at Hotel Mead in Wisconsin Rapids, May 9 & 10. The theme of the Summit is "Forward Together."With uncertainty surrounding the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and potential changes to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, known as FoodShare in Wisconsin), the conference aims to create a space for local direct service agencies, healthcare professionals, advocates, policy experts, and state agencies together to learn, network, and build capacity to improve their efforts to fight hunger, improve health, and strengthen local communities.WHO:        State experts on health and hunger including: Bevan Baker, Milwaukee Health Commissioner;Katharine Broton, Wisconsin HOPE Lab; Jennifer Casey, Executive Director at the Fondy Food Center; Paul Kelleher, PhD, Associate Professor of Bioethics and Philosophy at UW-Madison; Robert Zeaske, Chief Executive Officer, Second Harvest HeartlandWHAT:          Health and Hunger Summit hosted by Feeding WisconsinWHERE:          Hotel Mead, Wisconsin RapidsWHEN:          May 9 & 10"Hunger and health are intimately connected," said David Lee, the executive director at Feeding Wisconsin. "Hunger leads to poor health, which can keep people out of the workforce, reduce children's ability to learn, and increase public healthcare costs. Our intent with the conference is to help hunger fighters, health promoters and other stakeholders throughout the state to network and learn from each other in order to cross-pollinate and accelerate our progress toward a healthy and hunger-free Wisconsin. Given the challenges our friends and neighbors are facing with rising healthcare costs and increased barriers to nutrition assistance, this work now seems more important than ever."In addition to the 20 track sessions led by state and local leaders over the course of the day-and-a-half conference, the event will also feature three general sessions led by national and state leaders to explore emerging issues in hunger, nutrition, and health.The opening general session on May 9 at 1pm will be given by, a researcher at the Wisconsin HOPE Lab, a national leader on the issue of hunger on college campuses. The title of her talk is "Too Distressed to Learn: Hunger and Mental Health in Higher Education."The Breakfast Panel Discussion on May 10 at 8:15 am on "What is 'Healthy?': Deepening Our Understanding to Improve Health and Strengthen Communities through Food and Policy" will feature, Executive Director at the Fondy Food Center,, Associate Professor of Bioethics and Philosophy at University of Wisconsin, Madison, and, Chief Executive Officer, Second Harvest Heartland.The Summit's Keynote Session, "Addressing Public Health and Nutrition in Wisconsin's Largest and Most Diverse City," will be given byon May 10at 1:00 pm.Last year's inaugual, one-day event, attended 180 people from across the state, laid the groundwork for this expanded conference this year."What's really exciting about the Summit is that it brings together people from across the state to collaborate and work together to solve hunger and improve health," said Patti Habeck, President of Feeding America Eastern Wisconsin, the largest food bank in the Feeding Wisconsin network of food banks.###Feeding Wisconsin is the state association of the six regional Feeding America food banks that provide emergency food assistance and access to benefit assistance in every corner of our state. Its mission is help its food banks and partners fight hunger, improve health, and strengthen communities.Its members include: Feeding America Eastern Wisconsin, Second Harvest Foodbank of Southern Wisconsin, Feed My People Food Bank, Second Harvest Heartland, Second Harvest Northern Lakes Food Bank, and Channel-One Regional Food Bank.Together, with its collective network of 1,000 local food pantries located in every county of Wisconsin, the Feeding Wisconsin food banks provide 50 million meals to nearly 600,00 friends and neighbors every year.Visit us at https://www.FeedingWI.org and https://hungerandhealth2017.eventnut.com/ for more information.


Families for Treatment of Serious Mental Illness (TreatSMI), a nonprofit organization focused on advocacy, support and education for the seriously mentally ill and their family members, announced that it will be coming together with friends and fellow advocates for the first annual march demanding the right to treatment before tragedy for the 10 million Americans who suffer from a serious mental illness.  The Shattering Silence March will take place simultaneously in Washington DC; Augusta, ME; Sacramento, CA: Springfield, IL; Palm Beach, FL and Sarasota, FL, on May 20th, with a goal to raise awareness of the plight of the seriously-mentally ill: a hospital bed instead of jail, housing instead of homelessness, and an end to the criminalization of people with serious mental illnesses. The March will take place from 12:00 PM until 5:00 PM, on May 20th, in each location, and is open to the public. Family members and advocates will be sharing their stories about the lack of access to proper treatment, loved ones revolving in and out of hospitals, jails, and the street, and how mental illness is criminalized instead of treated like the medical illness it is. Please see below for location details. “I don't know when this country lost its human decency towards its most vulnerable citizens, but it surely has and it's time to stop it,” said Jeanne Gore, President of Families for Treatment of Serious Mental Illness (TreatSMI). “We need a revolution and we need one now! If our children were afflicted with cancer or diabetes, we would not be waiting until they reached Stage 4 in the disease, or become a danger to themselves or others, before being able to access treatment. We owe it to our children—and their children—to provide a country where ALL of our most vulnerable are treated with love, care, respect and compassion. “Please join us in replacing stigma with honor, silence with voice, despair with hope, shame with respect, and ignorance with science so that in 2017, we finally get treatment before tragedy,” added Gore. “We hope to be adding more state capitals and cities to the list very soon.” “Our children are dying everyday,” said DJ Jaffe, author of “Insane Consequences: How the Mental Health Industry Fails the Mentally Ill” and Executive Director of Mental Illness Policy Org. “They are being abused, neglected, tortured, shackled, jailed, subjected to solitary confinement, naked in their cells, covered in feces, and left to die in our jails and homeless in our streets.” “Even the most tenacious mental health advocates in our Hope for Mentally Ill program hit insurmountable roadblocks, and struggle with endless red tape, to help family members get the desperately-needed treatment and social justice for their mentally ill loved ones,” states Kerry Martin, CEO and Founder of Hope Xchange. “This is truly a heartbreaking situation, given that most seriously mentally ill individuals suffer from schizophrenia and severe bipolar disorder. They obviously aren’t in a position to advocate for themselves, not to mention navigate a woefully inadequate and totally underfunded mental health care system.” Hope Xchange is a patient advocacy nonprofit focused on preventing suicide and improving mental health outcomes in the most vulnerable and high-risk populations—youth, LGBTQA+ and bipolar communities—and is actively supporting the Shattering Silence March. The National Alliance for the Mentally Ill (NAMI) estimates there are 10 million Americans suffering from a serious mental illness. [1] The DMS categorizes serious mental illnesses as those that result in functional impairment which substantially interferes with, or limits, one or more major life activities. It’s estimated that 4% of all mental illnesses are serious mental illnesses.  These include “schizophrenia-spectrum disorders,” “severe bipolar disorder,” and “severe major depression,” as specifically and narrowly-defined in DSM.”[2] In addition to these disorders, people who suffer with severe forms of obsessive compulsive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, and borderline personality disorder, are also functionally impaired. As many as 40% (Torrey & Zdanowicz, 2001) and 90% (Wilson, Ban, & Guy 1986) of people with a serious mental illness also suffer from anosognosia, a neurological condition that robs them of the ability to know they are sick. This means they will never ask for help on their own. The Treatment Advocacy Center’s research paper, Serious Mental Illness and Treatment Prevalence, published in 2016 states, “For the past 20 years, studies have consistently estimated that 40% to 50% of all individuals with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder are receiving no treatment for their mental illness at any given time. According to disease prevalence estimates of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) and US Census Bureau data, this suggests 3.85 million people with the most severe psychiatric diseases were untreated in 2015.”[3] About Families for Treatment of Serious Mental Illness (TreatSMI) Founded in 2015, Families for Treatment of Serious Mental Illness (TreatSMI) is a non-profit organization dedicated to advocating at the state and local levels for treatment, programs, services, housing and care for those diagnosed with serious mental illnesses, and to provide support and education programs to families and caregivers. TreatSMI goals are to provide a strong grassroots advocacy network and offer support groups and classes aimed at dealing with the complex issues confronting families of those suffering from a serious mental illness. We are the only U.S. based national organization that: [1] Schizophrenia-spectrum disorders include schizoaffective disorder, catatonic schizophrenia, paranoid schizophrenia, and disorganized schizophrenia. In DSM, “severe bipolar” requires more symptoms than bipolar disorder. As in DJ Jaffe’s book, Insane Consequences: How the Mental Health Industry Fails the Mentally Ill , we shorten both to bipolar because there are not enough statistics that separate out the two. In DSM, “severe major depression” requires more symptoms than either “depression” or “major depression.” American Psychiatric Association, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: DSM-5 (Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Association, 2013). [2] Schizophrenia-spectrum disorders include schizoaffective disorder, catatonic schizophrenia, paranoid schizophrenia, and disorganized schizophrenia. In DSM, “severe bipolar” requires more symptoms than bipolar disorder. As in DJ Jaffe’s book, Insane Consequences: How the Mental Health Industry Fails the Mentally Ill , we shorten both to bipolar because there are not enough statistics that separate out the two. In DSM, “severe major depression” requires more symptoms than either “depression” or “major depression.” American Psychiatric Association, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: DSM-5 (Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Association, 2013).


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

NEW YORK, May 11, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- May is Mental Health Month, so UFC 205 Winner, former UFC lightweight champion and future Hall of Famer Frankie “The Answer” Edgar and his company Move+Sportswear teamed with YourUpdateTV and D S Simon Media to champion The Feeling Brain, the world's first neuroscience education on the interdependence of brain function, emotion, behavior and health! A video accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/b61879fa-d348-41b4-8a75-e85019a84794 A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/af3bfa3a-cc5d-48e1-baaf-74541060b7b8 For more information and access to other media materials please visit: https://www.movesportswear.com/pressroom/ Before he steps into the Octagon May 13th at UFC 211 in Dallas, Texas, VP of apparel brand Move+Sportswear, MMA world champion fighter Frankie Edgar, his business partners and team including WSOF fighter Marlon Moraes, elite boxing coach Mark Henry, and Nick Catone MMA urge everyone to join them in this fight for better mental health training for physicians and their patients. “Go to Movesportswear.com to help us advance medicine one t-shirt at a time. Proceeds support The Feeling Brain series - critical education for doctors and patients on brain function and emotion. Post your selfie wearing it. Let’s move positive together,” says Move+Sportswear CEO and co-founder, Russ Terlecki. Nearly 450 million people suffer with depression, anxiety and other emotional conditions – a staggering figure spanning race, culture, socioeconomics, generations, and genders alike. Most families struggle in some way. Doctors aren't trained to effectively treat a global mental health crisis of epidemic proportions. Why? No medical education exists on the neural basis of emotion – until now. The Feeling Brain shows the direct relationship between brain circuitry and structure and treatable medical conditions. Mental health needn’t be a silent battle for doctors and their patients. Frankie Edgar affirms, “If a doctor doesn’t have the know-how or resources, they’re not going to be able to help their patients. “The Feeling Brain” provides doctors with important education, and is a perfect fit for Move+Sportswear. We want to move positive, and what’s more positive than giving our doctors all the information they need to help people with mental and emotional health.” A collaborative effort of neuroscientists, medical and media experts, “The Feeling Brain: Exploring the Neural Basis of Emotion” fills a void in medical education to advance more effective resources for doctors and patients worldwide. Neuroscientist David Edelman, PhD, Dartmouth College and Chief Science Officer of MedNeuro says, “Emotion is a critical aspect of every variety of higher brain function that you can imagine. Anxiety, depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, PTSD and other emotional conditions are no less physiological than chronic disease such as cancer or diabetes, and all happen in this object we call the brain.” “If you look in the emergency departments in the United States, most people who come in with emotional or disruptive behavior, there’s no place to send them. There’s not a staff psychiatrist, no psychiatric holding bed. We want to provide materials for the hundreds of thousands of physicians who end up treating patients with mental and emotional conditions because there’s not enough trained professionals to do it in the first place,” says Bob Sweeney, DS MA, Executive Director of Challenger Corp and Chief Strategic Advisor/CFO of MedNeuro. “We will provide materials not just for psychiatrists and neurologists, but for the hundreds of thousands of physicians, and millions of nurses who treat patients with mental illness every day.” According to recognized authority on patient-centered health care and public policy, Dr. Hassan Tetteh, “For years, I have promoted the importance of mental health in achieving 'total' health. However, the tools currently available to the average practitioner to treat patients with emotional conditions are limited. Thus, The Feeling Brain education initiative is of particular interest.” Dr. Tetteh is a board-certified surgeon specializing in thoracic surgery, critical care, and heart and lung transplantation at MedStar Health and Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. “I’m a fighter. I have to train with the best coach, the best equipment; our doctors need the same. They have to be trained by the best,” says former WSOF champion Marlon Moraes, who makes his UFC debut in June’s UFC 212. It’s our mission as a company to become a world leader in athletic sportswear with positive messages emphasized on and off our sports apparel. Move+Sportswear’s “Move+ment” Program creates positive energy in sports and education globally, and supports the advancement of mental health care. To learn more about this breakthrough education initiative, visit TheFeelingBrain.org. About Move+Sportswear Co-founders, Russ Terlecki and Steve Rivera, also owner of Elite Wrestling Clubs, launched Move+Sportswear with Frankie Edgar to support proper education on and off the fields. Terlecki and Rivera were college teammates and NCAA All American wrestlers. Rivera was childhood Frankie’s wrestling coach. Emphasis on respect and honor, growth of self-esteem and encouragement of healthy competition are cornerstones of their company’s philosophy. To join them in moving positive for mental healthcare, go to Movesportswear.com. About Frankie Edgar UFC 205 Winner at Madison Square Garden in New York City, former UFC lightweight champion and future Hall of Famer, Frankie “The Answer” Edgar is the current No. 2 featherweight in the world. The New Jersey native trains with his Iron Army team, Renzo Gracie, Ricardo Almeida and Nick Catone, MMA. Frankie is coming off a unanimous decision win over Jeremy Stephens at UFC 205 in November. A top contender in the UFC for 10 years (21-5-1 MMA, 15-5-1 UFC), Edgar will be taking on rising prospect and ninth-ranked featherweight Yair Rodgriguez at UFC on May 13th in Dallas, Texas. About Move+Sportswear Frankie Edgar is Vice President of Move+Sportswear. The company’s “Move+ment” Program supports and spreads positivity in the sports world and in education, to create positive energy and movement globally. Support of proper education on and off the fields, emphasis on respect and honor, growth of self-esteem and encouragement of healthy competition are cornerstones of Move+Sportswear’s philosophy as we present our quality sportswear brand to the public. About MedNeuro and The Feeling Brain Breakthrough neuroscience education and pioneering clinical content for primary care physicians and medical professionals. Our focus is the emotional component of mental health – which is largely overlooked – and fills a huge gap in evidence-based science education. The Feeling Brain: Exploring the Neural Basis of Emotion is the first Visual CME course that shows in a scientific fashion the direct relationship between brain circuitry and structure and treatable medical conditions. Our total health strategy communicates breakthrough evidence-based findings for medical professionals, higher learning systems, point-of-care networks, and the general public for maximum impact. About YourUpdateTV  YourUpdateTV is a social media video portal for organizations to share their content, produced by award-winning video communications firm, D S Simon Media (http://www.dssimon.com). It includes separate channels for Health and Wellness, Lifestyle, Media and Entertainment, Money and Finance, Social Responsibility, Sports and Technology.


News Article | May 8, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

Although worrying does not feel good, it may have surprising benefits, when done in just the right amount, two psychology researchers argue in a new editorial. For example, worrying may motivate people to engage in behaviors that are potentially beneficial to their health, the researchers said. People who are worried may slather on sunscreen to help prevent skin cancer, and women may get regular mammograms to screen for breast cancer, the researchers said. "Despite its negative reputation, not all worry is destructive or even futile," lead author Kate Sweeny, a psychology professor at the University of California, Riverside, said in a statement. However, the relationship between worry and behaviors that are potentially beneficial to people's health is complex and seems to depend on how much a person worries, the authors noted. [9 DIY Ways to Improve Your Mental Health] Previous research has shown that "women who reported moderate amounts of worry, compared to women reporting relatively low or high levels of worry, are more likely to get screened for cancer," Sweeny said. "It seems that both too much and too little worry can interfere with motivation, but the right amount of worry can motivate without paralyzing." In the editorial, the authors looked at research that had examined both the downsides and upsides of worry. For example, studies have linked excessive worrying with such downsides as anxiety, fatigue, trouble concentrating and sleep problems, the researchers wrote in the editorial, published April 18 in the journal Social and Personality Psychology Compass. However, other research has shown that worrying can also have positive effects on behavior, the researchers said. Worrying may not only motivate people to take action, as in using sunscreen, but also may allow people to better prepare themselves for negative experiences in their lives, and develop a greater appreciation for positive experiences in their lives. For example, if a person is worrying and bracing for the worst in a certain situation, and then if that person receives the bad news they have been bracing for, the person's disappointment will be mitigated by their worrying. However, if that same person receives good news instead of the bad news they were expecting, then the person may experience more excitement than if he or she had not been worried in the first place, the researchers said. [5 Wacky Ways to Quantify Happiness] The new paper "flies in the face of what a lot of people may assume when it comes to worry," said Simon Rego, an associate professor of clinical psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York. However, the idea that worry may have an upside is definitely valid, said Rego, who was not involved in writing the editorial. Moreover, there are other psychological states, and emotions, that may feel unpleasant to the person who is experiencing them, but that can nonetheless be useful to this person. For example, experiencing justifiable anger may motivate people to "defend themselves or correct a sense of injustice," Rego told Live Science. If a person sees someone else key-scratching his or her car, then experiencing anger would motivate the car owner to do something to rectify the injustice that is happening, he said.


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Life of Purpose Treatment celebrates one year of establishing their Denton, Texas facility. Located at the University of North Texas, the program was established on May 9, 2016. As the one first addiction treatment centers on a college campus in the United States, young adults can receive clinical services to address substance misuse on the UNT campus. The facility’s program fits seamlessly into UNT’s continuum of mental health support services offered to students. Denton Life of Purpose serves clients seeking intensive outpatient treatment and academically focused aftercare. Offered as a step down from a primary level of care, or as a stand-alone program, the Life of Purpose Treatment model provides services specifically designed to assist emerging adults who have a desire to attend college or to find purpose in life. The Texas team includes Christopher Poulos, who serves as Executive Director, Audra Williams, LCSW, Joshua Trepple MSW, LCDC-I, and John Kelsey. Andrew Burki, MSW, and Andrew Maggiore continue to serve as Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, respectively. In addition to establishing the Denton Life of Purpose facility at UNT, it has also been a year that the Life of Purpose Group helped establish the Office of Substance Misuse and Mental Health Recovery Research at the university. This office is committed to advancing the field of recovery research by combining services in the areas of education and training, research and evaluation, technical assistance and technology development. The Life of Purpose treatment model was developed based on research indicating higher success rates in emerging adults whose recovery and academic support are integrated. In 2013, Andrew Burki, opened Life of Purpose Treatment at the Florida Atlantic University campus. Young adults who are seeking recovery from substance use disorder, but do not want their treatment to keep them from pursuing university degrees, have a therapeutic care resource at the University of North Texas. To learn more about the Denton Life of Purpose facility, visit: http://www.lifeofpurposetreatment.com About Life of Purpose Treatment Life of Purpose Treatment is the only primary care academically focused substance use disorder treatment facility located on college campuses across the United States. With facilities at the University of North Texas, near Middle Tennessee State University and at Florida Atlantic University, the program was specifically designed for emerging adults whose education has been disrupted by substance misuse.


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

NEW YORK, May 11, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- May is Mental Health Month, so UFC 205 Winner, former UFC lightweight champion and future Hall of Famer Frankie “The Answer” Edgar and his company Move+Sportswear teamed with YourUpdateTV and D S Simon Media to champion The Feeling Brain, the world's first neuroscience education on the interdependence of brain function, emotion, behavior and health! A video accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/b61879fa-d348-41b4-8a75-e85019a84794 A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/af3bfa3a-cc5d-48e1-baaf-74541060b7b8 For more information and access to other media materials please visit: https://www.movesportswear.com/pressroom/ Before he steps into the Octagon May 13th at UFC 211 in Dallas, Texas, VP of apparel brand Move+Sportswear, MMA world champion fighter Frankie Edgar, his business partners and team including WSOF fighter Marlon Moraes, elite boxing coach Mark Henry, and Nick Catone MMA urge everyone to join them in this fight for better mental health training for physicians and their patients. “Go to Movesportswear.com to help us advance medicine one t-shirt at a time. Proceeds support The Feeling Brain series - critical education for doctors and patients on brain function and emotion. Post your selfie wearing it. Let’s move positive together,” says Move+Sportswear CEO and co-founder, Russ Terlecki. Nearly 450 million people suffer with depression, anxiety and other emotional conditions – a staggering figure spanning race, culture, socioeconomics, generations, and genders alike. Most families struggle in some way. Doctors aren't trained to effectively treat a global mental health crisis of epidemic proportions. Why? No medical education exists on the neural basis of emotion – until now. The Feeling Brain shows the direct relationship between brain circuitry and structure and treatable medical conditions. Mental health needn’t be a silent battle for doctors and their patients. Frankie Edgar affirms, “If a doctor doesn’t have the know-how or resources, they’re not going to be able to help their patients. “The Feeling Brain” provides doctors with important education, and is a perfect fit for Move+Sportswear. We want to move positive, and what’s more positive than giving our doctors all the information they need to help people with mental and emotional health.” A collaborative effort of neuroscientists, medical and media experts, “The Feeling Brain: Exploring the Neural Basis of Emotion” fills a void in medical education to advance more effective resources for doctors and patients worldwide. Neuroscientist David Edelman, PhD, Dartmouth College and Chief Science Officer of MedNeuro says, “Emotion is a critical aspect of every variety of higher brain function that you can imagine. Anxiety, depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, PTSD and other emotional conditions are no less physiological than chronic disease such as cancer or diabetes, and all happen in this object we call the brain.” “If you look in the emergency departments in the United States, most people who come in with emotional or disruptive behavior, there’s no place to send them. There’s not a staff psychiatrist, no psychiatric holding bed. We want to provide materials for the hundreds of thousands of physicians who end up treating patients with mental and emotional conditions because there’s not enough trained professionals to do it in the first place,” says Bob Sweeney, DS MA, Executive Director of Challenger Corp and Chief Strategic Advisor/CFO of MedNeuro. “We will provide materials not just for psychiatrists and neurologists, but for the hundreds of thousands of physicians, and millions of nurses who treat patients with mental illness every day.” According to recognized authority on patient-centered health care and public policy, Dr. Hassan Tetteh, “For years, I have promoted the importance of mental health in achieving 'total' health. However, the tools currently available to the average practitioner to treat patients with emotional conditions are limited. Thus, The Feeling Brain education initiative is of particular interest.” Dr. Tetteh is a board-certified surgeon specializing in thoracic surgery, critical care, and heart and lung transplantation at MedStar Health and Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. “I’m a fighter. I have to train with the best coach, the best equipment; our doctors need the same. They have to be trained by the best,” says former WSOF champion Marlon Moraes, who makes his UFC debut in June’s UFC 212. It’s our mission as a company to become a world leader in athletic sportswear with positive messages emphasized on and off our sports apparel. Move+Sportswear’s “Move+ment” Program creates positive energy in sports and education globally, and supports the advancement of mental health care. To learn more about this breakthrough education initiative, visit TheFeelingBrain.org. About Move+Sportswear Co-founders, Russ Terlecki and Steve Rivera, also owner of Elite Wrestling Clubs, launched Move+Sportswear with Frankie Edgar to support proper education on and off the fields. Terlecki and Rivera were college teammates and NCAA All American wrestlers. Rivera was childhood Frankie’s wrestling coach. Emphasis on respect and honor, growth of self-esteem and encouragement of healthy competition are cornerstones of their company’s philosophy. To join them in moving positive for mental healthcare, go to Movesportswear.com. About Frankie Edgar UFC 205 Winner at Madison Square Garden in New York City, former UFC lightweight champion and future Hall of Famer, Frankie “The Answer” Edgar is the current No. 2 featherweight in the world. The New Jersey native trains with his Iron Army team, Renzo Gracie, Ricardo Almeida and Nick Catone, MMA. Frankie is coming off a unanimous decision win over Jeremy Stephens at UFC 205 in November. A top contender in the UFC for 10 years (21-5-1 MMA, 15-5-1 UFC), Edgar will be taking on rising prospect and ninth-ranked featherweight Yair Rodgriguez at UFC on May 13th in Dallas, Texas. About Move+Sportswear Frankie Edgar is Vice President of Move+Sportswear. The company’s “Move+ment” Program supports and spreads positivity in the sports world and in education, to create positive energy and movement globally. Support of proper education on and off the fields, emphasis on respect and honor, growth of self-esteem and encouragement of healthy competition are cornerstones of Move+Sportswear’s philosophy as we present our quality sportswear brand to the public. About MedNeuro and The Feeling Brain Breakthrough neuroscience education and pioneering clinical content for primary care physicians and medical professionals. Our focus is the emotional component of mental health – which is largely overlooked – and fills a huge gap in evidence-based science education. The Feeling Brain: Exploring the Neural Basis of Emotion is the first Visual CME course that shows in a scientific fashion the direct relationship between brain circuitry and structure and treatable medical conditions. Our total health strategy communicates breakthrough evidence-based findings for medical professionals, higher learning systems, point-of-care networks, and the general public for maximum impact. About YourUpdateTV  YourUpdateTV is a social media video portal for organizations to share their content, produced by award-winning video communications firm, D S Simon Media (http://www.dssimon.com). It includes separate channels for Health and Wellness, Lifestyle, Media and Entertainment, Money and Finance, Social Responsibility, Sports and Technology.


Pollack, understanding that survivors and first-responders would need aid, reached out to Genomind for additional support; the personalized medicine company brings advancements to mental healthcare through genetic testing. It donated to Pollack more than four dozen of its Genecept Assay® test kits for Pulse survivors and first-responders; the test looks at key genes in a patient's DNA that affect how they respond to medication. This may help clinicians understand if a drug may work or cause side effects before it's even taken. "While there are still some aspects of identifying and treating PTSD that we don't know, there is a lot we do understand and implementing best practices as soon as possible is extremely beneficial," says Pollack. "People dealing with PTSD often don't have the patience to go through a round-robin of trying to figure out which medicines are the best match. That's why this simple genetic testing is so important. It's collected by swabbing the inside of the cheek with a cotton swab. I thank Genomind for this recognition during Mental Health Awareness Month." "May is a time for all of us to focus on the need for mental health screening and treatment. We know than one in five adults will experience mental illness in our country. That's why we are grateful to partner with clinicians such as Dr. Pollack to provide genetic testing that may help patients get better, faster," says Michael Koffler, Genomind President and CEO. Genomind recently unveiled an enhanced Genecept Assay; it now covers more than 20 drug classes, 122 medications approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 18 clinically validated genes and 97 percent of medications used to treat depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, attention deficit disorder and autism. It also offers comprehensive coverage of pain medications. Genomind is a personalized medicine company bringing innovation to mental health care through genetic testing. Genomind is comprised of pioneering researchers and thought leaders in psychiatry and neurology and specializes in pharmacogenetic laboratory testing for psychiatry. Genomind is committed to partnering with clinicians to improve their patients' lives. Learn more at www.genomind.com. The Genecept Assay is a genetic test designed to help clinicians optimize treatment decisions for their patients with mental illness. It identifies patient-specific genetic markers that indicate which treatments are likely to work as intended, have no effect or cause adverse effects. It is an easily administered cheek swab test that analyzes key genes that have been selected based on hundreds of studies showing that variations in these genes can inform treatment decisions. The Assay is used to guide treatment for a range of psychiatric conditions, including depression, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), bipolar disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), autism, schizophrenia, chronic pain and substance abuse, and has been shown in peer-reviewed published studies to improve patient outcomes and reduce overall medical costs. Each Assay provides clinicians with an easy-to-read patient report and a complimentary psychopharmacogenomic consultation. Learn more at www.genomind.com To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/mental-health-awareness-month-genomind-recognizes-psychiatrist-who-made-a-difference-during-pulse-nightclub-tragedy-300454541.html

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