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News Article | May 24, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The National Association of Professional Women (NAPW) honors Lillian Jackson as a 2017-2018 inductee into its VIP Woman of the Year Circle. She is recognized with this prestigious distinction for leadership in entrepreneurship. NAPW is the nation’s leading networking organization exclusively for professional women, boasting more than 850,000 members, a thriving eChapter and over 200 operating Local Chapters. “I’m pleased to welcome Lillian into this exceptional group of professional women,” said NAPW President Star Jones. “Her knowledge and experience in her industry are valuable assets to her company and community.” Self-motivated and results driven to succeed, Lillian Jackson is a seasoned professional who has constantly set her goals to keep pace with her highest aspirations for personal excellence. Throughout her career, she has exhibited exemplary teamwork, expertise, integrity and dedication. Ms. Jackson is an Independent IDLife Associate, a company that, according to its website, “offers a complete line of customizable pharmaceutical grade supplements, weight loss, workout performance, sleep, skincare and children’s nutrition products that are organic and non-GMO.” As an Independent Associate, Ms. Jackson provides information and products about health and wellness and facilitates customized nutrition programs for individuals that are powered by a free HIPAA compliant health assessment. In addition to her role with IDLife, Ms. Jackson, who has an M.S. in Pastoral Clinical Mental Health Counseling from Loyola University, is a Pastoral Counselor. “I help people find wholeness,” she said. Ms. Jackson supports a number of charitable groups, including her church, where she volunteers and teaches preschool, Cinderella Cares, a nonprofit organization whose mission is to “empower patients and their families dealing with lung cancer.” She is an AVON39.org walker and fundraiser in the fight against breast cancer. About NAPW NAPW’s mission is to provide an exclusive, highly advanced networking forum to successful women executives, professionals and entrepreneurs where they can aspire, connect and achieve. Through innovative resources, unique tools and progressive benefits, professional women interact, exchange ideas, advance their knowledge and empower each other.


Therachat, a smart guided journaling tool for improving mental health, today released results of its new survey in an infographic on the current state of anxiety in support of National Mental Health Awareness Month. The nationwide survey of 900 U.S. respondents, familiar with anxiety, was conducted in April 2017 and benchmarked general anxiety levels as well as identified the top triggers, impact to regular activities and effectiveness of coping exercises. The survey was conducted online among a cross section of generational groups including Gen Z (ages 19 and under), Millennials (ages 20 to 36), Gen X (ages 37 to 52), Baby Boomers (ages 53 to 72) and Silent Generation (ages 73+). Therachat also analyzed differences in gender, relationship status, location type and employment status. The data insights emphasize the role anxiety plays in the lives around us and shows that while therapy is proven to help, therapist visits are not being sought out. Key findings include: ●    47 percent of respondents experience anxiety daily, 28 percent experience anxiety weekly and 18 percent experience anxiety monthly. ●    The top three anxiety triggers are “confrontation” (68 percent), “the future” (68 percent) and “work/school” (67 percent). ●    Of those who experience anxiety (daily, weekly or monthly), the majority (92 percent) believes they “cannot fix it alone.” However, 67 percent do not get the support and understanding they need from those close to them. This number was a lot higher with those who are widowed (89 percent) or divorced (79 percent). ●    The majority (77 percent) of respondents with anxiety do not currently go to a therapist. The most common reason being attributed to cost (44.6 percent) and self-identifying symptoms as “mild” (40.3 percent). ●    Of the 23 percent of respondents who visit a therapist, 46 percent find the sessions effective and 47 percent feel progress is hard to measure. With Gen X, 81 percent of therapy patients find it effective. “In support of National Mental Health Awareness Month, this report is aimed to showcase the prevalence of anxiety, create opportunities to discuss mental health issues and build a culture of acceptance,” said Kouris Kalligas, CEO and co-founder of Therachat. “We’re dedicated to providing resources and tools that will benefit people suffering from anxiety and to help them cope with and achieve mental fitness goals. As part of these efforts and to promote self-awareness, we’re continuing to expand the capabilities of our artificial intelligence-driven journaling tool with the mission of reminding people to slow down, document and examine their thoughts.” This is the first survey Therachat plans to release on issues related to anxiety and mental wellness as well as mobile tools and apps. Therachat is a smart, HIPAA-compliant guided journaling tool that aims to improve therapy outcomes and provide anxiety management techniques. It’s used by therapists and their clients as well as individual users who want to improve their mental health. Therachat’s mobile app for therapy clients and users without a therapist is driven by an interactive 24/7 AI-powered chatbot that helps achieve mental fitness and therapy goals. Its web-based dashboard provides therapists with real-time insights and analysis to inform in-person sessions and keep clients on track in-between visits. Headquartered in San Francisco, Calif., Therachat is available nationwide through its web and mobile applications. For additional information, visit https://therachat.io.


Dr. Denise Florane, ASRT, BS, DC, C.Ad, DACACD, Addictionologist and Mental Health Physician within her own private practice, Florane Functional Neuroscience, has been named a 2017 Top Doctor in Northshore New Orleans, Louisiana. Top Doctor Awards is dedicated to selecting and honoring those healthcare practitioners who have demonstrated clinical excellence while delivering the highest standards of patient care. Dr. Denise Florane has a wealth of experience in many fields of medicine, and has been in practice for more than 23 years. Her career in medicine began in 1993, when she gained her Doctor of Chiropractic Degree from the Palmer College of Chiropractic in Davenport, Iowa. Immediately following, she was honored to be chosen as one of 15 positions worldwide, into a 2 year Radiology Diplomate Residency – Faculty Program at Palmer College of Chiropractic Davenport campus. ALWAYS A LEADER, with a never ending thirst for knowledge, multi discipline training, Dr. Florane holds 544 college, post-graduate, and doctoral credit hours, with an additional 500 credit hours in Boarded Diplomate studies as a court recognized expert in her field. After many years as a successful and acclaimed chiropractor, Dr. Florane undertook extensive training in the treatment of addictions and compulsive disorders. In 2011, she became #78 in the United States, and the only physician in Louisiana as a Boarded Diplomat of the American College of Addictionology and Compulsive Disorders, a Certified Addictionologist, a Certified Laserologist, and after which she completed and earned the only “Clinical Residency Program” in Addiction medicine, at a drug rehab center in Miami Dade County, Florida. Additionally, she has been recognized and quantified as a Court Expert in Addiction Medicine, and as such, has served in trial in the St. Tammany Parish Judicial System, Louisiana. Traditionally, Behavioral health issues require counseling, support groups, and often prescription drug therapies. Also, treatment requires “active” participation, which can be quite difficult. Causes of mental health is that, and so much more! Finally, a new approach is here! Dr. Florane provides the latest in groundbreaking therapies. In addition to traditional therapies, she has developed a “passive” four pronged approach to regulate the underlying neurological causative factors in behavioral health issues, which has been ignored for decades. Patients come from far and wide, seeking treatment from California, Colorado, Kentucky, and Florida are just a few.Her office is located next to Lakeview Regional Behavioral Health Center, in Covington, Louisiana. Treatment includes neuroplasticity rebalancing of the brain and central nervous system, via low level lasers, Auriculocranial microcurrent, spinal cord stimulation, and targeted nutrition based upon neurochemical hormone lab analysis. Additionally, ionic Laser Detox For patients of which have suffered from severe emotional trauma, she prescribes Biofield Energy Therapies, which is administered by her associate Darnell Gouzy RMT, CCH., with Life Energy Therapies, LLC. With this new groundbreaking approach in the treatment of Addictive & Compulsive disorders, Dr. Florane has had some of greatest success rates in treating all aspects of behavioral health. Disorders treated include, but are not limited to alcohol, drug, and multi-media addictions, ADHD, anorexia, anxiety – panic, anger – rage, bulimia, cognitive decline, compulsions, depression, overeating, PTSD, sleep disorders. Dr. Florane has become renowned for her approach to Addiction Medicine, using the principles of passive mental health treatments and neuroplastic retraining of the brain. Her groundbreaking work in this field makes Dr. Denise Florane a very worthy winner of a 2017 Top Doctor Award. To schedule an appointment, contact at 985-273-7912, or 504-421-7246. Top Doctor Awards specializes in recognizing and commemorating the achievements of today’s most influential and respected doctors in medicine. Our selection process considers education, research contributions, patient reviews, and other quality measures to identify top doctors.


News Article | May 23, 2017
Site: www.prlog.org

Tickets Now on Sale to July 22 Event to Benefit Children's Mental Health Needs


News Article | May 23, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

BestColleges.com, a leading provider of higher education information and resources, today announced a series of new rankings focused on degree opportunities in the Social Services. “The most rewarding work is having the opportunity to help others. We celebrate Mental Health Awareness Month by releasing a new series of rankings that feature online education programs in the Social Services. Our goal is to inspire, grow, and expand the all-important workforce that specializes in mental health and social services,” said Stephanie Snider, General Manager, BestColleges.com The Rankings with the top ten schools from each list of twenty-five: Bachelor’s in Sociology 1. University of Central Florida 2. Arizona State University - Tempe 3. Central Washington University 4. Brandman University 5. University of Colorado Denver 6. University of Nebraska at Omaha 7. Fort Hays State University 8. Oregon State University 9. North Dakota State University 10. South Dakota State University Bachelor’s in Psychology 1. University of Central Florida 2. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 3. Liberty University 4. University of North Dakota 5. University of Florida - Online 6. Trine University - Regional/Non-Traditional Campuses 7. LeTourneau University 8. University of Massachusetts - Lowell 9. Florida International University 10. Old Dominion University Bachelor’s in Counseling 1. John Wesley University 2. Johnson University 3. Indiana Wesleyan University - Marion 4. University of Cincinnati 5. University of South Dakota 6. Crown College 7. Northwestern State University of Louisiana 8. Oral Roberts University 9. Grace College and Theological Seminary 10. University of Central Arkansas Master’s in Psychology 1. Harvard University 2. University of Georgia 3. Touro University Worldwide 4. Nova Southeastern University 5. Adler Graduate School 6. Adler University 7. William James College 8. The University of Tennessee - Knoxville 9. The Chicago School of Professional Psychology at Los Angeles 10. Carlos Albizu University - Miami Master’s in Social Work 1. Columbia University in the City of New York 2. University of Southern California 3. Case Western Reserve University 4. Boston University 5. University of Central Florida 6. Fordham University 7. University of Denver 8. University at Buffalo 9. Ohio State University 10. California State University - Long Beach Master’s in School Counseling 1. Lehigh University 2. New York University 3. Wake Forest University 4. Liberty University 5. University of Missouri - Columbia 6. University of North Dakota 7. University of West Alabama 8. Seton Hall University 9. Concordia University - Wisconsin 10. Missouri Baptist University Full rankings can be found on each subject page by following the hyperlink in the titles. The 2017 rankings reflect the most recent data compiled from IPEDS and the College Navigator, both of which are hosted by the National Center for Education Statistics. The goal is to objectively assess relative quality based on academic outcomes, affordability, and the breadth and depth of online learning opportunities. Each school must meet the minimum criteria of being an accredited public or private, not-for-profit institution, and submit an annual report the the National Center for Education Statistics. More information on methodology can be found here: http://www.bestcolleges.com/subject-ranking-methodology/ About BestColleges.com: BestColleges.com helps prospective students find the school that best meets their needs through proprietary research, user-friendly guides, and hundreds of unique college rankings. They also provide a wide array of college planning, financial aid, and career resources to help all students get the most from their education and prepare them for the world after college.


News Article | May 29, 2017
Site: marketersmedia.com

The Citizens Commission on Human Rights (CCHR), a non-profit mental health watchdog dedicated to the eradication of abuses committed under the guise of mental health, is hosting a workshop on Advanced Mental Health Directives in honor of World Elder Abuse Awareness month at 6:30pm on June 14th at their center located at 109 N. Fort Harrison Ave in downtown Clearwater. The free workshop is being held in order to bring attention to the subject of elder abuse and to provide individuals with information on their rights and how to protect them. It is estimated that as many as 5 million elders are abused each year and that only 1 in 14 cases of abuse are reported.[1] An Advanced Mental Health Directive (AMHD) is a little known resource that can be used by individuals to protect their rights if they become incompetent to make decisions.[2] Known as a “Declaration”, Florida law allows a person to write instructions on what if any mental health care they wish to receive including hospitalization, psychiatric drugs, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and experimental procedures. According to Federal Medicare records, over 20,000 Americans received electroshock in 2014 under Medicare, which Americans are eligible for when they reach 65 years of age.[3] Of interest is that the percentage of elderly receiving ECT jumps dramatically for those who are eligible for Medicare from 3.4% of those under the age of 65 years receiving ECT to 15.6% for those 65 years of age and older.[4] “CCHR is bringing attention to the subject of elder abuse under the mental health law, especially the unnecessary involuntary psychiatric examination of seniors as well as the use of ECT on vulnerable adults,” stated Diane Stein, President of CCHR Florida. “This workshop will educate people on their rights and how a declaration can protect them from unwanted and even dangerous psychiatric drugs and procedures.” The workshop is free of charge and will be delivered by attorney Mrs. Carmen Miller who held the position of Assistant Public Defender in the Thirteenth Circuit for many years in Tampa, and is now in the private sector specializing in cases of those who are involuntarily committed under the Baker Act. For more information on the workshop or the protection of elder rights under the mental health law please call 727-442-8820 or visit www.cchrflorida.org. Initially established by the Church of Scientology and renowned psychiatrist Dr. Thomas Szasz in 1969, CCHR’s mission is to eradicate abuses committed under the guise of mental health and enact patient and consumer protections. It was L. Ron Hubbard, the founder of Scientology, who brought the terror of psychiatric imprisonment to the notice of the world. In March 1969, he said, “Thousands and thousands are seized without process of law, every week, over the ‘free world’ tortured, castrated, killed. All in the name of ‘mental health.’” For more information visit, www.cchrflorida.org [1] How many older Americans are abused? ncoa.org/public-policy-action/elder-justice/elder-abuse-facts/ [3] Petition to Ban ECT Device use on Elderly https://www.change.org/p/ban-electroshock-ect-device-being-used-on-children-the-elderly-and-vulnerable-patients [4] Variation in ECT use in the United States researchgate.net/publication/15444308_Variation_in_ECT_use_in_the_United_States For more information, please visit http://www.cchrflorida.org/


News Article | May 26, 2017
Site: www.scientificamerican.com

This week, as Mental Health Awareness Month draws to a close, I’m compelled to share an example of how data visualization can be many things we don’t necessarily expect it to be—personal, moving, equal parts imaginative and meticulous. Jill Simpson, a sociology research fellow at the University of York, recently published an article on visualizing mental illness, accompanied by a hand-drawn diagram documenting a day in her own life as a person with anxiety and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (commonly known as OCD). Apparently drawing inspiration from Giorgia Lupi’s and Stefanie Posavec’s Dear Data project, Simpson drives home some crucial messages. First, conditions like OCD are real and tangible health issues that don’t deserve be minimized as they often are in our culture. Second, everyone’s experience with mental illness is unique—this seems self-evident, but the specific and intimate nature of Simpson’s drawing reveals something essential that a list of symptoms simply cannot encompass. And finally, data visualization can be a powerful tool for communication and understanding, not only among people, but also within oneself.


News Article | May 23, 2017
Site: co.newswire.com

Psychologists Lt. Col. (Ret.) Bart Billings, Ph.D., from San Diego and John Breeding from Texas joined mental health industry watchdog Citizens Commission on Human Rights (CCHR) in opening a traveling exhibit on psychiatry in San Diego, California, on May 20, 2017. The event was held to raise awareness about electroshock (ECT) and to support a ban on its use, as the American Psychiatric Association (APA) is actively lobbying the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), which regulates the electroshock device, to increase its use. The psychologists are concerned that already in 2015, more than 770 active military or their family members were given electroshock in addition to over 1,000 veterans or their family members, according to Tricare and Veteran Affair statistics. Tricare even reported that children five and younger, while their brain is still developing, have been electroshocked. Both Billings and Breeding, have been outspoken against the mass drugging of military members and veterans but see the use of electroshock (also known as electroconvulsive therapy, or ECT — up to 460 volts of electricity through the brain) as an even greater assault. Addressing hundreds attending the Exhibit opening, Dr. Billings, author of Invisible Scars: How to Treat Combat Stress and PTSD Without Medication, said he’s especially concerned about ECT when some patients may already be suffering from brain injuries from combat duty. “I feel any treatment that destroys healthy brain cells, which ECT does, should be seen as criminal abuse,” he said. Dr. John Breeding, Ph.D., an Austin, Texas psychologist of more than 30 years, echoed Dr. Billings’ concerns. Breeding was instrumental in helping obtain a Texas ban on electroshocking children and adolescents younger than 16 and Texas now has one of the strongest ECT reporting laws. “ECT is an absolute wrong,” said Breeding. “It always causes brain damage, it always causes memory loss. It sometimes kills people, and, therefore, has no place in a ‘therapeutic’ environment. It should be banned.” CCHR hosted the exhibit, which includes award-winning documentaries on the history of psychiatry. They recently obtained the Tricare statistics on ECT usage, finding that between 2010 and 2016, an average of 745 military personnel or their family members were given an average of 12,147 electroshocks each year. CCHR also filed a Freedom of Information Act request to the VA which showed that between 2012 and 2016, an average of 950 veterans or their family members were given an average of 11,323 electroshocks each year. ECT causes a grand mal seizure, which the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) reports can cause cardiovascular complications (including heart attacks), breathing complications, confusion, permanent memory loss, brain damage and death. In 2016, Petty Officer 3rd Class Wilbur Harwell was found not guilty by “lack of mental responsibility” for the June 6, 2014, stabbing of another sailor at Portsmouth Naval Medical Center. Harwell had undergone a dozen rounds of electroshock and was taken off psychiatric drugs immediately prior to the unprovoked attack.[1] Studies report that stopping psychotropic drugs can cause violent withdrawal affects, let alone the added violence of electroshock to the brain. In 2013, British psychiatrist Joanna Moncrieff and others reported in The Journal of Psychoactive Drugs: “It is now accepted that all major classes of psychiatric medication produce distinctive withdrawal effects…. Just like the various substances that are used recreationally, each type of psychiatric medication induces a distinctive altered mental and physical state….”[2] As early as World War I, psychiatrists used electroshock on soldiers “complaining” about battle fatigue or neurosis. In Germany, soldiers were electroshocked using a strong alternating current combined with verbal suggestions in the form of military-style commands.[3] Friedrich Panse, who later became the president of the German Society for Psychiatry and Neurology, also founded a procedure using electric shock on soldiers near the front during World War II, used to get them to continue fighting.[4] Panse’s method was dreaded as a method of torture.[5] More than 3,500 people have signed an online petition, launched during Mental Health Month, calling for a ban on the use of electroshock, which CCHR encourages veterans, military and their family members to sign. CCHR's Traveling Exhibit on the history of psychiatry is open until May 27, 2017. Located at: 1047 J Street, San Diego, California. Open from 9 a.m. – 9 p.m. CCHR was established in 1969 by the Church of Scientology and Dr. Thomas Szasz, Professor of Psychiatry and Lifetime Fellow of the APA. CCHR has helped obtain over 175 laws that protect individuals against psychiatric abuse. A California State Assembly Recognition of CCHR states: “The contributions that the Citizens Commission on Human Rights International has made to the local, national and international areas on behalf of mental health issues are invaluable and reflect an organization devoted to the highest ideals of mental health services.” [1] “Attorney: Sailor charged with attempted murder found not guilty by 'lack of mental responsibility,'” The Virginian-Pilot, 26 Feb. 2016, http://pilotonline.com/news/military/local/attorney-sailor-charged-with-attempted-murder-found-not-guilty-by/article_1065b359-36d4-5996-a3fc-bf370ac5e0ed.html; “Attorney says Navy sailor had shock therapy before stabbing another sailor in Portsmouth,” The Virginian Pilot, 1 Sept. 2015, http://pilotonline.com/news/military/attorney-says-navy-sailor-had-shock-therapy-before-stabbing-another/article_e00f87a2-d182-5d76-b887-8835d9ccc771.html. [2] Joanna Moncrieff, M.B.B.S., David Cohen, and Sally Porter,  “The Psychoactive Effects of Psychiatric Medication: The Elephant in the Room,” J Psychoactive Drugs. 2013 Nov; 45(5): 409–415; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4118946/. [6] Jonathan Emord & Associates, Citizens Petition regarding the classification of the ECT Device, August, 2016, http://emord.com/blawg/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/1-ECT-Citizen-Petition.pdf. [8] Harold Robertson, Robin Pryor, “Memory and cognitive effects of ECT: informing and assessing patients,” Advances in Psychiatric Treatment, May 2006, 12 (3) 228-237; DOI: 10.1192/apt.12.3.228, http://apt.rcpsych.org/content/12/3/228.full. [9] Ana Jelovac, et al., “Relapse Following Successful Electroconvulsive Therapy for Major Depression: A Meta-Analysis,” Neuropsychopharmacology, Nov 2013, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3799066/.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

PALO ALTO, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Thanks to the outstanding philanthropic leadership of an anonymous Palo Alto resident, CHC is moving forward with plans to launch Palo Alto’s first Intensive Outpatient Program (IOP) this spring, filling a critical gap in teen mental health services. The IOP, located on CHC’s campus, will address the needs of teens between the ages of 14-18 with significant anxiety, depression, and/or suicidal thoughts. “We are in the perfect place to do this, we have the qualified staff to do it, and now, thanks to a generous lead donor, we can move forward right away, knowing that it will be accessible and affordable to all teens, regardless of financial capacity,” said CHC’s Executive Director, Dr. Rosalie Whitlock. After a recent qualitative study revealed a significant need for a Palo Alto-based intensive after school therapy program for teens, CHC was driven to add an IOP to its robust web of support for at-risk teens. It is a natural extension of CHC’s comprehensive continuum of care and overall commitment to helping local youth realize their promise and potential. “It was time to listen to our community by creating a local resource that can meet the mental health needs of our struggling teens,” said Dr. Ramsey Khasho, Director of The Center at CHC. CHC’s skilled adolescent psychiatrists and expert teen therapists will allow for seamless transitions between the IOP and less intensive outpatient therapy services. “CHC is a natural home for an IOP because we have appropriate space, knowledge and skill sets along with the passion and heart for the community and our teens,” said Dr. Lynette Hsu, Head of Adolescent Mental Health Services at CHC. CHC’s twelve-week IOP will be able to accommodate up to eight teens at a time and will be offered on a rolling basis, four days/week during after-school hours, enabling teens to maintain their daily school routines. The IOP’s therapeutic multimodal approach includes evidence-based interventions including Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT)—considered the IOP gold standard for psychological treatment of mental health disorders—and Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT), as well as best practices in mindfulness. Seasoned, licensed clinicians trained through the Linehan Institute (founded by Marsha Linehan, Ph.D., the developer of DBT therapies), will provide individual, group, and family therapy; psychiatry with medication management; an academic skills component; mindfulness training (physical, art, nutrition); and parent and multi-family skill groups. Those who will benefit most from CHC’s IOP include teens with moderate to severe symptoms of anxiety or depression; self-harm behaviors (i.e. cutting); suicidal thoughts with or without plans; significant decrease in functioning at school and at home (i.e. sharp decline in grades, missing school); and those for whom weekly outpatient therapy is not effective for symptom reduction and improved functioning. The program covers the often overlooked but essential middle ground between weekly outpatient therapy and hospitalization, and provides transition support between the two. The program also provides a critical step-down service for teens discharged and returning from psychiatric inpatient stays. Because teen anxiety and depression symptoms are not clear-cut and many parents may not know what level of help their teen needs, CHC is also expanding its free 30-minute expert consultation service. “We want to offer clarity and comfort during what can be a scary and confusing time for parents,” said Dr. Khasho. Parents are encouraged to call, even if they aren’t certain whether their teen is exhibiting typical adolescent behavior or warning signs of something more serious. Connecting those in need with those who can help is the cornerstone of CHC’s Teen Mental Health Initiative (TMHI) of which the IOP will be an integral part. TMHI also aims to remove stigma, raise awareness and reduce teen suicide through accessible, affordable and compassionate teen therapy; community education; and community engagement. “Teen mental health is not an issue that can be tackled by CHC alone,” said Dr. Whitlock. “In order to make a lasting impact, we need to educate ourselves and each other, leverage strengths and partnerships, and involve all stakeholders—from teens and teachers to parents and government officials.” On this front, CHC has incorporated 12 new teen-focused classes into its free community education program (link); launched a Teen Mental Health Committee, made up of local teens who want to use their voices to reduce stigma and advocate change; partnered with Stanford to develop a Teen Mental Health Leadership Collaborative of local leaders of various stakeholder groups to leverage the community’s collective strengths and make advancements in the Bay Area teen mental health system of care; and hosts regular gatherings with local school counselors and wellness coordinators to understand and address unmet mental health needs at the school and district level. A complex problem deserves a comprehensive solution, and a changing landscape requires a nimble strategy. “We are not interested in a band-aid fix,” said Dr. Khasho. “We won’t rest until we see meaningful and lasting results.” In addition to CHC’s award-winning education and mental healthcare services, CHC has long been a community resource. On March 16th, CHC will host its annual community breakfast featuring guest speakers Nancy Lublin, Founder and CEO of the acclaimed Crisis Text Line, the 24-hour crisis intervention service delivered via text; Jayne Apple, WNBA Star and founder of Bring Change 2 Mind, a non-profit working to end the stigma and discrimination surrounding mental illness; James B. Everitt, EdD, Director, Office of Mission Initiatives & Institutional Planning for Sacred Heart Schools, which oversees the School’s health and wellness efforts; and Ramsey Khasho, PsyD, CHC Director of The Center & Director of Clinical Services, Sand Hill School. Over the next year CHC will continue to bring the community together through education, expert panels, breakfast meetings and other events to highlight the various needs of teens. Ongoing developments and details about the CHC Teen Mental Health Initiative and the new IOP may be found at www.chconline.org. To schedule a free 30 minute consultation or an appointment for services call 650.688.3625 or email help@chconline.org. CHC is a nonprofit agency that has been serving children, youth, teens and young adults in San Mateo and Santa Clara Counties as well as the greater San Francisco Bay Area for nearly 65 years. The CHC Teen Mental Health Initiative expands affordable teen therapy, mental health education, and community leadership and engagement directly, and through community collaborations, to help reduce teen anxiety and depression, and prevent teen suicide. The goal of the agency is to remove barriers to learning regardless of language, location, learning style or ability to pay. The agency specializes in Anxiety & Depression, ADHD, Learning Differences, and Autism with The Center, two schools, Community Clinic and Community Education. www.chconline.org

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