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Site: http://www.scientificcomputing.com/rss-feeds/all/rss.xml/all

The Research Data Alliance (RDA) is a global organization — supported by funding bodies in Europe, the U.S., and Australia — that has been established to improve data sharing for research. This article focuses on the “Data and computing infrastructures for open scholarship” track of RDA's e-Infrastructures and RDA for data-intensive science workshop, which took place on September 22, 2015, in Paris, France. Open scholarship is important for an open society and has the power to improve lives across the globe. However, achieving this vision may require the redesign, enhancement, or adaptation of the e-infrastructures used for conducting research and disseminating results. Jarkko Siren, a project officer in the European Commission’s e-infrastructure unit, opened the first session of the workshop track. As well as drawing attention to the emphasis that has been placed on open data in the Horizon 2020 funding program, he used his presentation to speak about the need for transparency in research architectures: “Open scholarship requires new designs and architectures,” he says. “It requires transparency at all levels of the research life-cycle, which effectively leads to trust and uptake.” Read more about this in a recent discussion post from Siren. Giulia Ajmonemarsan presented a new report by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) entitled 'Making Open Science a Reality'. The report opens with these jarring words, which neatly sum up the scale of the challenge faced: “Science is the mother of the digital age. And yet, 22 years after CERN [the European Organization for Nuclear Research] placed the World Wide Web software in the public domain, effectively creating the open Internet, science itself has struggled not only to ‘go digital’ but also to ‘go open’”. The full report, which includes an assessment of the progress made in several countries towards making the vision of open science a reality, can be read in full on the OECD website. William Gunn, director of scholarly communication at Mendeley, spoke about the problem of irreproducibility in science. He cited research showing that around half of all research results cannot be reproduced — for a variety of factors — and argues that digital infrastructures have a key role to play in remedying this. Gunn suggested a number of specific steps for reducing reliance on contacting the original authors of research papers. In particular, he stressed the need to build tools to better capture the full research workflow, and to make these at least semi-automated where possible. Several new EC-supported projects — funded under the Horizon 2020 program — were showcased as part of this workshop track. Among these was the THOR project (‘technical and human infrastructure for open research’), which was presented by Sünje Dallmeier-Tiessen of CERN. This 30-month project builds on the success of ODIN. It is working — through better integration of persistent identifiers — to establish seamless integration between articles, data, and researchers across the research lifecycle. Thus, the project collaborators aim to create a wealth of open resources and foster a sustainable international e-infrastructure. By doing so, they hope to reduce unnecessary duplication of work, improve economies of scale, enrich research services, and create new opportunities for innovation. Another CERN representative to speak at the event was Tim Smith, who presented the research repository Zenodo, in support of open science. Read more about this in our feature article from the repository’s launch back in 2013. Sharing for the good of society The workshop track concluded with a panel discussion featuring several high-profile figures. During this, Jean-Pierre Bourguignon, president of the European Research Council, argued passionately for the importance of training people to have the right skills. “Research is very dynamic,” says Bourguignon. “The landscape is changing very, very quickly, and will continue to do so. We need to train people to become data scientists.” Kathleen Shearer, director of the Confederation of Open Access Repositories (COAR) highlighted the need to look at infrastructure from a global perspective. This is key, she believes, if we’re going to use infrastructure to help tackle major global problems. She also highlighted the importance of openness, reusability, standards, interoperability. Finally, Marie Farge, director of research at the French National Center for Scientific Research, emphasized the importance of not just sharing data, but also properly preserving it. “Sharing is not just about sharing in space, but also in time,” she says. “We’re building on past work and preparing work for future generations to build on”. “Sharing is at the core of science,” continues Farge. “Science is part of culture and part of knowledge. We need to protect our right to share knowledge... it is a commons: something that everyone can use, but which no one owns.” This article was originally published on ScienceNode.org. Read the original article.


Vanden Heuvel J.P.,INDIGO Biosciences | Vanden Heuvel J.P.,Pennsylvania State University | Bullenkamp J.,Kings College London | Iorns E.,Science Exchange | And 5 more authors.
eLife | Year: 2016

The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology seeks to address growing concerns about the reproducibility in scientific research by conducting replications of selected experiments from a number of high-profile papers in the field of cancer biology. The papers, which were published between 2010 and 2012, were selected on the basis of citations and Altmetric scores (Errington et al., 2014). This Registered Report describes the proposed replication plan of key experiments from “Systematic identification of genomic markers of drug sensitivity in cancer cells” by Garnett and colleagues, published in Nature in 2012 (Garnett et al., 2012). The experiments to be replicated are those reported in Figures 4C, 4E, 4F, and Supplemental Figures 16 and 20. Garnett and colleagues performed a high throughput screen assessing the effect of 130 drugs on 639 cancer-derived cell lines in order to identify novel interactions for possible therapeutic approaches. They then tested this approach by exploring in more detail a novel interaction they identified in which Ewing’s sarcoma cell lines showed an increased sensitivity to PARP inhibitors (Figure 4C). Mesenchymal progenitor cells (MPCs) transformed with the signature EWS-FLI1 translocation, the hallmark of Ewing’s sarcoma family tumors, exhibited increased sensitivity to the PARP inhibitor olaparib as compared to MPCs transformed with a different translocation (Figure 4E). Knockdown mediated by siRNA of EWS-FLI1 abrogated this sensitivity to olaparib (Figure 4F). The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology is a collaboration between the Center for Open Science and Science Exchange, and the results of the replications will be published by eLife. © Vanden Heuvel and Bullenkamp. Source


Kraker P.,Know Center | Schlogl C.,University of Graz | Jack K.,Mendeley | Lindstaedt S.,Know Center
Journal of Informetrics | Year: 2015

In this paper, we analyze the adequacy and applicability of readership statistics recorded in social reference management systems for creating knowledge domain visualizations. First, we investigate the distribution of subject areas in user libraries of educational technology researchers on Mendeley. The results show that around 69% of the publications in an average user library can be attributed to a single subject area. Then, we use co-readership patterns to map the field of educational technology. The resulting visualization prototype, based on the most read publications in this field on Mendeley, reveals 13 topic areas of educational technology research. The visualization is a recent representation of the field: 80% of the publications included were published within ten years of data collection. The characteristics of the readers, however, introduce certain biases to the visualization. Knowledge domain visualizations based on readership statistics are therefore multifaceted and timely, but it is important that the characteristics of the underlying sample are made transparent. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Schlogl C.,University of Graz | Gorraiz J.,University of Vienna | Gumpenberger C.,University of Vienna | Jack K.,Mendeley | Kraker P.,Know Center
Scientometrics | Year: 2014

In our article we compare downloads from ScienceDirect, citations from Scopus and readership data from the social reference management system Mendeley for articles from two information systems journals (“Journal of Strategic Information Systems” and “Information and Management”) published between 2002 and 2011. Our study shows a medium to high correlation between downloads and citations (Spearman r = 0.77/0.76) and between downloads and readership data (Spearman r = 0.73/0.66). The correlation between readership data and citations, however, was only medium-sized (Spearman r = 0.51/0.59). These results suggest that there is at least “some” difference between the two usage measures and the citation impact of the analysed information systems articles. As expected, downloads and citations have different obsolescence characteristics. While the highest number of downloads are usually made in the publication year and immediately afterwards, it takes several years until the citation maximum is reached. Furthermore, there was a re-increase in the downloads in later years which might be an indication that citations also have an effect on downloads to some degree. © 2014, Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, Hungary. Source


Schlogl C.,University of Graz | Gorraiz J.,University of Vienna | Gumpenberger C.,University of Vienna | Jack K.,Mendeley | Kraker P.,Know Center
Proceedings of ISSI 2013 - 14th International Society of Scientometrics and Informetrics Conference | Year: 2013

In our article we compare downloads from ScienceDirect, citations from Scopus and readership data from the social reference management system Mendeley for articles from the Journal of Strategic Information Systems (publication years: 2002-2011). Our study shows a medium to high correlation between downloads and readership data (Spearman r=0.73) and between downloads and citations (Spearman r=0.77). However, there is only a medium-sized correlation between readership data and citations (Spearman r=0.51). These results suggest that there is at least "some" difference among the two usage measures and the (citation) impact of the analysed information systems articles. As expected downloads and citations have different obsolescence characteristics. While the highest downloads accrue the first years after publication, it takes several years until the citation maximum is reached. © AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH Vienna 2013. Source

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