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Lajevardi S.H.,Islamic Azad University of Arak | Dias D.,Grenoble Alpes University | Racinais J.,MENARD
Geotechnical Engineering for Infrastructure and Development - Proceedings of the XVI European Conference on Soil Mechanics and Geotechnical Engineering, ECSMGE 2015 | Year: 2015

The behaviour of the interface is an important parameter for reinforced soil structures where the friction between the soil and reinforcement elements is mobilized. The pull-out test is the most commonly adopted method to identify the friction coefficient. In this paper, 18 pull-out tests were conducted on two types of welded steel meshes (normal and dense mesh) embedded in a sand to investigate the soil/reinforcement interaction. The tests were conducted under vertical stresses ranging from 20 to 140kPa on the reinforcement. The French standard (NF P 94-270, 2009) uses an analytical method to predict the friction coefficient. The comparison with the experimental results agrees reasonably well. Ju et al. (2004) developed a new test method based on a staged pull-out test for extensible reinforcements. In this study and for inextensible reinforcement, this new test method has also been used. In a usual pull-out test, only one vertical stress has been used. For a staged pull-out test, several vertical stresses are used. The results of staged pull-out tests are in good agreement with results of usual pull-out test. © The authors and ICE Publishing: All rights reserved, 2015.


Lajevardi S.H.,INSA Lyon | Dias D.,University Grenoble Alpes | Racinais J.,MENARD
Geotextiles and Geomembranes | Year: 2013

The interface friction coefficient is an important design parameter for reinforced soil structures where the friction between the soil and reinforcement elements is mobilized. The pull-out test is the most commonly adopted method to identify this friction coefficient. In this paper, 18 pull-out tests were conducted on two types of welded steel meshes (normal and dense mesh) embedded in a sand to investigate the soil/reinforcement interaction. The tests were conducted under vertical stresses ranging from 20 to 140kPa on the reinforcement. The French standard (. NF P 94-270, 2009) uses an analytical method to predict the friction coefficient. The comparison with the experimental results agrees reasonably well. Ju etal. (2004) developed a new test method based on a staged pull-out test for extensible reinforcements. In this study and for inextensible reinforcement, this new test method has also been used. In a usual pull-out test, only one vertical stress has been used. For a staged pull-out test, several vertical stresses are used. The results of staged pull-out tests are in good agreement with results of usual pull-out test. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.


Rodriguez A.N.T.P.,Menard | Montejano J.C.,Menard | Sanz R.V.,University Politechnique Valence
Geotechnical Engineering for Infrastructure and Development - Proceedings of the XVI European Conference on Soil Mechanics and Geotechnical Engineering, ECSMGE 2015 | Year: 2015

Land reclamation often involves the placement of loose granular soil (gravel/sand) by means of hydraulic filling. These soils generally have a low relative density, under static loads, loose granular soil may be subjected to bearing failure and large settlements. Various densification methods of deep compactacion (dynamic compaction, vibroflotation, stone columns, etc.), but for large areas, usually the most economical method is the dynamic compaction. This method improves, need a process control. The "in situ" techniques selected to control the improvement grade were: boreholes with SPT tests, DPSH, CPTU, CSWS geophysical tests, SEISMOGRAPH monitoring and topographic control of settlements. These in situ techniques allowed to evaluate the dynamic compaction efficiency as well as the ground modifications that could cause potential damages to adjacent buildings (in case we have some gas tanks). © The authors and ICE Publishing: All rights reserved, 2015.


Eggers P.J.,GEI Consultants Inc. | Dwight J.,Menard | Grant C.B.,GEI Consultants Inc. | Hurd M.C.,GEI Consultants Inc.
Geotechnical and Structural Engineering Congress 2016 - Proceedings of the Joint Geotechnical and Structural Engineering Congress 2016 | Year: 2016

Wolf Creek Generating Station, a nuclear power plant located in central Kansas, recently completed a project to improve the essential service water (ESW) piping system that supplies water to cool the reactor. Part of the project involved the construction of retaining walls in the cooling water reservoir adjacent to the existing ESW pumphouse to retain new earth embankments. Site conditions and operational restrictions dictated the use of a wall system that would not interfere with the pumphouse or encroach on the reservoir, that could be constructed without temporary cofferdams or dewatering, and that could meet the design and construction quality assurance requirements for nuclear safety-related structures. To meet these requirements, a cantilever retaining wall system consisting of nearly-Tangent large-diameter rock-socketed drilled shafts was designed to resist conventional earth retention and bulkhead wall loads as well as forces associated with tornado-generated missiles. The steel-cased reinforced concrete shafts were installed from a barge, a cast-in-place concrete cap beam was built to tie the shafts together, and rock fill was placed behind the walls to form the new embankments. © ASCE.


Hamidi B.,GFWA | Masse F.,Menard United States | Racinais J.,Menard | Varaksin S.,Apageo
Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers: Geotechnical Engineering | Year: 2016

Deep foundations by implementation of piles have been the historical and conventional solution for supporting heavy loads in low-strength or highly compressible soils. During recent decades, however, ground improvement has successfully been able to provide competitive and economical technical foundation solutions by increasing the ground’s mechanical properties, thereby increasing bearing capacity and reducing total, differential and creep settlements. Controlled modulus columns are formed by installing cementitious columnar rigid inclusions into soft ground, and can be considered as the boundary between the classical deep foundations and ground improvement technologies. These elements have a pile-like appearance, but are designed as ground improvement inclusions. This paper discusses the concept of the controlled modulus column, its design philosophy and the way it behaves; a case study of the world record for depth of a controlled modulus column installation is also presented to demonstrate its application. © ICE Publishing. All rights reserved.


Brule S.,Menard | Javelaud E.H.,Menard | Enoch S.,Aix - Marseille University | Guenneau S.,Aix - Marseille University
Physical Review Letters | Year: 2014

Materials engineered at the micro- and nanometer scales have had a tremendous and lasting impact in photonics and phononics. At much larger scales, natural soils civil engineered at decimeter to meter scales may interact with seismic waves when the global properties of the medium are modified, or alternatively thanks to a seismic metamaterial constituted of a mesh of vertical empty inclusions bored in the initial soil. Here, we show the experimental results of a seismic test carried out using seismic waves generated by a monochromatic vibrocompaction probe. Measurements of the particles' velocities show a modification of the seismic energy distribution in the presence of the metamaterial in agreement with numerical simulations using an approximate plate model. For complex natural materials such as soils, this large-scale experiment was needed to show the practical feasibility of seismic metamaterials and to stress their importance for applications in civil engineering. We anticipate this experiment to be a starting point for smart devices for anthropic and natural vibrations. © 2013 Published by the American Physical Society.


Brule S.,Menard | Javelaud E.H.,Menard
Geotechnical Engineering for Infrastructure and Development - Proceedings of the XVI European Conference on Soil Mechanics and Geotechnical Engineering, ECSMGE 2015 | Year: 2015

The standard EN 1998 or Eurocode 8 engendered a revision of the regulations in seismic hazard mapping as well as the values of the parameters occurring in the design of normal and special seismic risk projects. The shear wave velocity values Vs is the more important criteria for ground type definition and so for the elastic spectrum. Building project needs representative ground type definition based on investigations. That's the reason why the horizontal to vertical spectral ratio seismic ambient noise method (FW method) was tested to estimate the ground fundamental period To in a geotechnical purpose, by virtue of its ease of use. The method exists since about twenty years and was concerned with a significant development these last years at instigation of the seismological research SESAME project in Europe. In conditions of restrictive use, as for two soil layers models with a net acoustic impedance contrast, it is possible to precharacterize the ground type in the sense of the standard EN 1998. © The authors and ICE Publishing: All rights reserved, 2015.


Burtin P.,Menard | Racinais J.,Menard
Procedia Engineering | Year: 2016

The embankment going to Dordogne Viaduct crossed by the LGV South Europe Atlantic SEA is based on 4 000 semi-rigid inclusions (CMC) designed in accordance with ASIRI. Published in 2012, these recommendations are starting to be well known and applied around the world. Depending on the purpose of the CMC (stability or only settlement reduction), CMCs justifications differ. For the first case, verifications are more numerous and more severe. After CMC ground improvement work in 2013, the embankment had been performed and the rail is being installed. A monitoring setting up during project progress has allowed the comparison between predicted deformations and measurements. © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V.


Patent
Menard and Millett | Date: 2011-11-30

The invention relates to a method and a plant for the treatment of an organic waste material (3a, 3b) in a liquid form comprising subjecting the liquid to anaerobic fermentation in a biogas reactor (9) resulting in a digestate (17, 23) and subjecting the digestate (17, 23) to ultrafiltration (31) and reverse osmosis (45) wherein the digestate (17, 23) from the biogas reactor (9) is centrifuged in a centrifugation step (25) resulting in a centrifugate liquid fraction (29) that shows a content of dry matter lower than 3 %, and a centrifugate concentrate fraction (27), before being subjected to ultrafiltration (31) and in that the centrifugate concentrate fraction (27) is returned to the biogas reactor (9).


Trademark
Menard | Date: 2012-02-11

Eyewear; Eyewear, namely, sunglasses, eyeglasses and ophthalmic frames and cases therefor; Eyewear, namely, novelty party eyewear.

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