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News Article | April 29, 2017
Site: co.newswire.com

Interview Infection-Prevention Experts at Pulse CPSEA's Spring Symposium, 'Infection Prevention: It Begins with You!' Healthcare reporters are invited to speak personally with leading national experts in the prevention of healthcare-acquired infections in advance of Pulse Center for Patient Safety Education & Advocacy’s Spring Symposium, Infection Prevention: It Begins with You! in Plainview, N.Y., at 5 p.m. on Monday, May 1. It’s bad enough being in the hospital, but it can be so much worse when a patient contracts an “HAI” — a Healthcare-Acquired Infection — while there. Despite the best efforts of the medical profession, growing numbers of patients still contract infections in health care facilities. This is one of the most critical challenges facing the medical profession today. Pulse’s symposium will focus on the latest findings about HAIs, and three key speakers will discuss the issue and what we can do about it. The formal program starts at 6 p.m., but members of the press are invited to talk one-on-one with our speakers from 5 to 6 p.m. Janet Eagan RN — Manager, Infection Control at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. She specializes in infection control in the oncology patient population. Bruce E. Hirsch MD, FACP, AAHIVS — Attending Physician, Division of Infectious Diseases, North Shore University Hospital. He is interested in preventive health strategies and the role of healthy bacteria in the human microbiome. Lisa A. Waldowski DNP, PNP, CIC — Infection Control Specialist, Standards Interpretation Group, The Joint Commission Enterprise. She advises surveyors with interpretations and education about infection control findings, and responds to challenging questions, complaints, and potential threat to life/patient safety events. Please take advantage of this unique opportunity to pose your questions to these industry-leading specialists. Here are the details: When: Monday, May 1. The event starts at 5 p.m. with a light buffet, refreshments and networking time; the formal program runs from 6 to 8 p.m. Where: Holiday Inn 215 Sunnyside Blvd, Plainview, NY 11803 Please RSVP to (516) 579-4711 or 516-830-0831 Pulse's Mission: To raise awareness about patient safety through advocacy, education and support.


Philadelphia, PA, April 18, 2017 - In the past, all forms of metastatic prostate cancer have been considered incurable. In recent years, the FDA has approved six drugs for men with metastatic disease, all of which can increase survival. In a study published in Urology®, researchers demonstrate for the first time that an aggressive combination of systemic therapy (drug treatment) with local therapy (surgery and radiation) directed at both the primary tumor and metastasis can eliminate all detectable disease in selected patients with metastatic prostate cancer. While the study is only a first step, one-fifth of the patients treated had no detectable disease, with an undetectable prostate-specific-androgen (PSA) and normal blood testosterone, after 20 months. The results suggest that some men who have previously been considered incurable can possibly be cured; investigators also establish a new paradigm for testing various drug combinations in conjunction with local treatment of the prostate to determine which is the best approach (ie, has the highest undetectable disease rate). Such results could not have been achieved with any single therapy alone. According to lead investigator Howard I. Scher, MD, Chief of the Genitourinary Oncology Service at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City, "The sequential use of the three different modalities helped illustrate the role and importance of each in achieving the undetectable PSA with normal testosterone level end point, which represents a 'no-evidence of disease' status." Longer follow-up is needed to determine whether these patients were in fact cured. Twenty men with metastatic prostate cancer, five with extra-pelvic lymph nodal disease and 15 with bone with or without nodal disease, were treated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), radical surgery that included a retroperitoneal lymph node dissection as needed, and radiation therapy to visible metastatic lesions in bone. ADT was stopped after a minimum of six months if an undetectable PSA was achieved after combined modality therapy. Other patients were treated continuously. The combined treatment regimen including surgery was well tolerated. Matthew J. O'Shaughnessy, MD, PhD, Urology Service, Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, commented "While the role of local therapy in metastatic prostate cancer is still under investigation, aggressive resection of visible disease performed by experienced surgeons was critical to the outcome." Of the five patients with extra-pelvic lymph node involvement, four achieved an undetectable PSA after ADT and surgery, while the fifth needed radiation to reach this milestone. However, none achieved the primary end point of undetectable PSA with testosterone recovery at 20 months after initiation of therapy with ADT alone, although one patient had a PSA of Of the 15 patients with bone metastases, 14 (93%) reached an undetectable PSA when ADT, surgery, and radiation were used. Ultimately, four (27%) achieved the proposed end point, a PSA of 150 ng/dL at 20 months after the start of ADT, which remained undetectable in two patients for 27 and 46 months, respectively. Commenting on the study, Oliver Sartor, MD, Cancer Research, Department of Medicine and Urology, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, stated, "The end point deserves special mention, as the end point of undetectable PSA after testosterone recovery has been previously discussed but rarely studied. The authors proposed that this end point may serve as a first step toward establishing a curative paradigm. Many in the field agree, but note that the longevity of effect is essential to prove the point of curability. Regardless, the movement toward a curative paradigm is much needed and the investigators are to be congratulated for setting forth a paradigm that can be used to assess the possibility of cure in a reasonable period of time." "A multimodal treatment strategy for patients who present with disease that is beyond the limits of curability by any single modality enables the evaluation of new approaches in order to prioritize large-scale testing in early stages of advanced disease. The end point also shifts the paradigm from palliation to cure," remarked Dr. Scher. It is expected that an upcoming Phase 2 trial will further test this endpoint and combined modality approach.


News Article | April 28, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

(Reuters Health) - Having a family history of prostate cancer doesn’t make it more risky for men with a new diagnosis of the disease to initially hold off on active treatment in favor of monitoring with periodic lab tests, a research review suggests. It’s becoming more common for doctors to skip aggressive treatments like surgery or radiation for men with low-risk prostate tumors in favor of doing periodic tests to see if tumors grow, a practice known as active surveillance. But research to date has offered a mixed verdict on whether this approach is safe for certain men with a higher risk, including black patients and people with a family history of prostate tumors. For the current study, researchers analyzed data from six previously published studies and found that active surveillance wasn’t linked with an increased risk of prostate cancer progressing for men with a family history. One study did, however, find that family history increased the risk of cancer progression in black men. “The current findings can help doctors reassure patients that having a family history of prostate cancer should not automatically exclude them from being considered for active surveillance, although more research needs to be done for African American men,” said senior study author Dr. James Dupree, a urology researcher at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. Most men with prostate cancer are diagnosed with low-risk tumors that haven’t spread to other parts of the body. Often, doctors and patients struggle to choose the best course of action because it's hard to tell which tumors will grow fast enough to be life-threatening and which ones might never get big enough to cause problems. “Just because a cancer is found, it does not automatically mean it needs to get treated right away,” Dupree said by email. “In some cases, cancer should be treated, but in other cases it may not need immediate treatment and can be managed with active surveillance.” For example, Dupree and colleagues reviewed one study of 200 patients that didn’t detect a meaningful difference in high-risk tumors based on whether or not men had a family history. In men who did have a family history, this study also didn’t find a difference in risk based on the number of relatives with prostate cancer. Two other studies in the review looked at biomarkers for prostate tumors, including results from prostate specific antigen (PSA) tests that are commonly used to look for these malignancies. Neither study found family history to be a meaningful predictor of aggressive prostate cancer. In another study, family history wasn’t a good predictor of aggressive tumors for most men, but it did signal an increased risk for black men. One limitation of the research review is that it included only six studies, the authors note in BJU International. Still, the findings should reassure men with a family history of prostate cancer that active surveillance may be a reasonable option in some cases, said Dr. Behfar Ehdaie, a urologic surgeon at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York who wasn’t involved in the study. “Screening for prostate cancer saves lives,” Ehdaie said by email. “However, the decisions after prostate cancer is detected may lead to overtreatment.” To strike the right balance, doctors can screen men at a young age with a PSA blood test to help determine a patient’s future risk, then recommend an appropriate treatment after a man is diagnosed with prostate cancer, Ehdaie added. “Incorporating active surveillance to treat men with low risk prostate cancer reduces the harms of overtreatment associated with both surgery and radiation therapy,” Ehdaie said.


News Article | May 1, 2017
Site: co.newswire.com

Interview Infection-Prevention Experts at Pulse CPSEA's Spring Symposium, 'Infection Prevention: It Begins with You!' Healthcare reporters are invited to speak personally with leading national experts in the prevention of healthcare-acquired infections in advance of Pulse Center for Patient Safety Education & Advocacy’s Spring Symposium, Infection Prevention: It Begins with You! in Plainview, N.Y., at 5 p.m. on Monday, May 1. It’s bad enough being in the hospital, but it can be so much worse when a patient contracts an “HAI” — a Healthcare-Acquired Infection — while there. Despite the best efforts of the medical profession, growing numbers of patients still contract infections in health care facilities. This is one of the most critical challenges facing the medical profession today. Pulse’s symposium will focus on the latest findings about HAIs, and three key speakers will discuss the issue and what we can do about it. The formal program starts at 6 p.m., but members of the press are invited to talk one-on-one with our speakers from 5 to 6 p.m. Janet Eagan RN — Manager, Infection Control at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. She specializes in infection control in the oncology patient population. Bruce E. Hirsch MD, FACP, AAHIVS — Attending Physician, Division of Infectious Diseases, North Shore University Hospital. He is interested in preventive health strategies and the role of healthy bacteria in the human microbiome. Lisa A. Waldowski DNP, PNP, CIC — Infection Control Specialist, Standards Interpretation Group, The Joint Commission Enterprise. She advises surveyors with interpretations and education about infection control findings, and responds to challenging questions, complaints, and potential threat to life/patient safety events. Please take advantage of this unique opportunity to pose your questions to these industry-leading specialists. Here are the details: When: Monday, May 1. The event starts at 5 p.m. with a light buffet, refreshments and networking time; the formal program runs from 6 to 8 p.m. Where: Holiday Inn 215 Sunnyside Blvd, Plainview, NY 11803 Please RSVP to (516) 579-4711 or 516-830-0831 Pulse's Mission: To raise awareness about patient safety through advocacy, education and support.


April 24, 2017 -- In newly updated clinical guidelines from the Society for Integrative Oncology (SIO), researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health and the Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center with an interdisciplinary team of colleagues at MD Anderson Cancer Center, University of Michigan, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, and other institutions in the U.S. and Canada, analyzed which integrative treatments are most effective and safe for patients with breast cancer. This systematic review adds to the growing literature on integrative therapies for patients with breast cancer and other cancer populations. The latest results are published online and in print in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians, a publication of the American Cancer Society. The researchers evaluated more than 80 different therapies and developed grades of evidence. Based on those findings, the Society for Integrative Oncology makes the following recommendations: "Studies show that up to 80 percent of people with a history of cancer use one or more complementary and integrative therapies, but until recently, evidence supporting the use of many of these therapies had been limited," said Heather Greenlee, ND, PhD, assistant professor of Epidemiology at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health, and past president of SIO. "Our goal is to provide clinicians and patients with practical information and tools to make informed decisions on whether and how to use a specific integrative therapy for a specific clinical application during and after breast cancer treatment," Greenlee continues. In their systematic evaluation of peer-reviewed randomized clinical trials, the researchers assigned letter grades to therapies based on the strength of evidence. A letter grade of "A" indicates that a specific therapy is recommended for a particular clinical indication, and there is high certainty of substantial benefit for the patient. Meditation had the strongest evidence supporting its use, and is recommended for reducing anxiety, treating symptoms of depression, and improving quality of life, based on results from five trials. Music therapy, yoga, and massage received a B grade for the same symptoms, as well as for providing benefits to breast cancer patients. Yoga received a B grade for improving quality of life based on two recent trials. Yoga and hypnosis received a C for fatigue. "The routine use of yoga, meditation, relaxation techniques, and passive music therapy to address common mental health concerns among patients with breast cancer is supported by high levels of evidence," said Debu Tripathy, MD, chair of Breast Oncology at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, and a past president of SIO. "Given the indication of benefit coupled with the relatively low level of risk, , these therapies can be offered as a routine part of patient care, especially when symptoms are not well controlled." Acupressure and acupuncture received a B grade as an addition to drugs used for reducing chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. In general, there was a lack of strong evidence supporting the use of ingested dietary supplements and botanical natural products as part of supportive cancer care and to manage treatment-related side effects. "Clinicians and patients need to be cautious about using therapies that received a grade of C or D and fully understand the potential risks of not using a conventional therapy that may effectively treat cancer or help manage side effects associated with cancer treatment," warned Lynda Balneaves, RN, PhD, associate professor, College of Nursing, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences, Winnipeg, Canada, and president-elect of SIO. "Patients are using many forms of integrative therapies with little or no supporting evidence and that remain understudied," noted Dr. Greenlee. "This paper serves as a call for further research to support patients and healthcare providers in making more informed decisions that achieve meaningful clinical results and avoid harm." Additional co-authors: Melissa J. DuPont-Reyes, Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University; Linda Carlson, Department of Oncology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; Misha Cohen, American College of Traditional Chinese Medicine at California Institute of Integral Studies, and Chicken Soup Chinese Medicine, San Francisco; Gary Deng, Integrative Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York City; Jillian A. Johnson, Department of Biobehavioral Health, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park; Matthew Mumber, Department of Radiation Oncology,Harbin Clinic, Rome, GA; Dugald Seely, Ottawa Integrative Cancer Center, Ottawa, ON, and Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine, Toronto, ON; Suzanna M. Zick, Department of Family Medicine, University of Michigan Health System, and Department of Nutritional Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor; and Lindsay M. Boyce, Memorial Sloan Kettering Library, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York City. Founded in 1922, Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health pursues an agenda of research, education, and service to address the critical and complex public health issues affecting New Yorkers, the nation and the world. The Mailman School is the third largest recipient of NIH grants among schools of public health. Its over 450 multi-disciplinary faculty members work in more than 100 countries around the world, addressing such issues as preventing infectious and chronic diseases, environmental health, maternal and child health, health policy, climate change & health, and public health preparedness. It is a leader in public health education with over 1,300 graduate students from more than 40 nations pursuing a variety of master's and doctoral degree programs. The Mailman School is also home to numerous world-renowned research centers including ICAP (formerly the International Center for AIDS Care and Treatment Programs) and the Center for Infection and Immunity. For more information, please visit http://www. .


Techonomy Returns to New York for Two Days of Intense Conversation About Technology’s Impact on Business and Society Techonomy, a leading events and media company focused on helping organizations and executives prepare for the rapid pace of tech-enabled transformation, will hold two consecutive events, Techonomy Health & Techonomy NYC, in New York City on May 16th & 17th. Techonomy, a leading events and media company focused on helping organizations and executives prepare for the rapid pace of tech-enabled transformation, will hold two consecutive events, Techonomy Health & Techonomy NYC, in New York City on May 16th & 17th. “We love our home city in New York and we love helping leaders engage with ideas about tech-driven change, so we are especially proud to be doing that here for the second year in a row,” said David Kirkpatrick, CEO and Chief Techonomist and author of the bestselling book, The Facebook Effect: The Inside Story of the Company that is Connecting the World. "We're inviting techonomic thinkers to join us for either one or both of two days – Techonomy Health first, and then Techonomy NYC on May 17." Techonomy Health explores the vast potential tech holds to remake this $3 trillion U.S. industry. The program includes healthcare experts, technologists, policy makers and entrepreneurs for a high-energy discussion around topics including how AI and CRISPR will change the war on cancer, the future of consumer health information and media, the ethical and moral quandaries of enhancing the human genome, and what Trumpcare and Obamacare mean for health innovation. Speakers include Len Greer, President, Johnson & Johnson Health and Wellness; Meredith Guerriero, director for the healthcare industry at Facebook; Arianna Huffington, Founder and CEO, Thrive Global; John Mattison, Chief Medical Information Officer, Kaiser Permanente; celebrated author and holistic medicine expert Dean Ornish; Claudia González Romo, Executive Office of the Secretary General, UNICEF; Oscar CEO Mario Schlosser; Brent Shafer, CEO of Philips North America; and Steven Zatz, CEO of WebMD. (Full list below.) The following day, Techonomy NYC will be a New York-style version of Techonomy’s longstanding retreat in California, where last fall Mark Zuckerberg famously spoke about fake news. Techonomy NYC will ignite invigorating discourse around ongoing challenges relating to what a government led by Trump means for technology; the future of work in an on-demand gig economy; the digital and social fight against terrorism; and tough-to-answer questions about decision making power in an AI world, among many other topics. Speakers include Beth Comstock, Vice Chair of GE; Karin Klein, Head of Investing Activities at VC firm Bloomberg Beta; Environmental Defense Fund President Fred Krupp; Turner CEO John Martin; Miguel McKelvey, Co-founder and Chief Creative Officer of WeWork; Eli Pariser, Co-founder and Co-CEO of Upworthy; and General Assembly CEO Jake Schwartz. (Full list below.) Techonomy's partners for the conferences include Accenture, Celestica, Cognizant, Johnson & Johnson, Paypal, Philips, Pitney-Bowes, and Turner Broadcasting. Techonomy Health confirmed speakers include: Yonatan Adiri, Founder and CEO, Healthy.io and Founder, DisruptionLabs; Agnes Binagwaho Vice Chancellor, University of Global Health Equity; Jef Boeke, Director of the Institute for Systems Genetics, NYU Langone Medical Center; Walter De Brouwer, Founder and CEO, doc.ai; Brian Donley, Chief of Staff, Cleveland Clinic; David Ewing Duncan, Co-Founder, Curator and CEO, Arc Fusion; Esther Dyson, Chairman, EDventure Holdings; Katelyn Gleason, CEO & Cofounder, Eligible; Claudia González Romo, Executive Office of the Secretary General, UNICEF; Len Greer, President, Johnson & Johnson Health and Wellness Solutions; Meredith Guerriero, director for the healthcare industry at Facebook Ron Gutman, Founder and CEO, HealthTap; Jill Hagenkord, Chief Medical Officer, Color Genomics; Arianna Huffington, Founder and CEO, Thrive Global; Nancy J. Kelley, President and CEO, Nancy J. Kelley & Associates and Former Founding Executive Director, New York Genome Center; Robert Klitzman, Director, Masters of Bioethics Program, Joseph Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University; Tom Kottler, CEO, Co-Founder, HealthPrize Technologies; Steven Krein, Co-founder and CEO, StartUp Health; Andrew Kung, Chair and Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center; Kristin Lemkau, Chief Marketing Officer, JPMorgan Chase; Christian Madsbjerg, Senior Partner, ReD Associates; John Mattison, Chief Medical Information Officer, Kaiser Permanente; Dan Munro, Author; Alexi Nazem, Co-founder and CEO, Nomad Health; Lynn O'Connor Vos, Chief Executive Officer, Grey Healthcare Group (ghg); Dean Ornish, President and Director, Preventive Medicine Research Institute; Meredith Salisbury, Editorial Director, Bioscribe; Mario Schlosser, Co-founder and CEO, Oscar; Brent Shafer, CEO, Philips North America; Seth Sternberg, Co-founder and CEO, Honor; Andrew Thompson, Co-founder and CEO, Proteus Digital Health, Inc.; and Steven Zatz, CEO, WebMD. Current agenda and additional information can be found at www.techonomy.com/health Techonomy NYC confirmed speakers include: Daniel Buchner, Senior PM - Head of Decentralized Identity at Microsoft, Microsoft; Beth Comstock, Vice Chair, GE; Meltem Demirors, Director, Development, Digital Currency Group; Diana Farrell, President and CEO, JPMorgan Chase Institute; Max Furmanov, Managing Director & Partner, Accenture; Andrea Glorioso, Counsellor, Digital Economy / Cyber, Delegation of the European Union to the USA; COL John Graham, Associate Dean for Research and Chief Scientist, United States Military Academy; Subramaniam Hariharan, VP Global Quality, Technology Innovation & Operational Excellence, Celestica; Jessi Hempel, Head of Editorial, Backchannel; Karin Klein, Head of Investing Activities, Bloomberg Beta; Fred Krupp, President, Environmental Defense Fund; Doreen Lorenzo, Co-founder, Vidlet Inc.; Director for the Center of Integrated Design, The University of Texas; Rachel Maguire, Research Director, Health Horizons Program, Institute for the Future; Gary Marcus, Professor, NYU; Founder, Geometric Intelligence (acquired by Uber); John Martin, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Turner; Miguel McKelvey, Co-founder and Chief Creative Officer, WeWork; Gregory McNeal, Co-Founder, AirMap; John Melkon, Center for the Study of Civil-Military Operations, United States Military Academy; Michael Monahan, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, Pitney Bowes; Eli Pariser, Co-founder and Co-CEO, Upworthy; Bre Pettis, Founder, Bre & Co.; Ernesto Quinteros, Chief Design Officer, Johnson & Johnson; Andrew Rasiej, Founder and Publisher, Personal Democracy Forum; Founder and CEO, Civic Hall; Slava Rubin, Chief Business Officer, Indiegogo; Julie Samuels, Executive Director, Tech:NYC; Jake Schwartz, Co-founder and CEO, General Assembly; Melanie Shapiro, Founder and CEO, Case; Oz Sultan, CEO, Sultan Interactive Group; Arun Sundararajan, Professor of Business, New York University; Author, "The Sharing Economy"; David Treat, Managing Director, Accenture; Bradley Tusk, Founder and CEO, Tusk Ventures; Michael J. Wolf, Co-founder and Managing Director, Activate, Inc.; and Tracy Young, CEO and Co-founder, PlanGrid. Current agenda and additional information can be found at www.techonomy.com/nyc Contacts: Techonomy Josh Kampel 617.233.7722 josh@techonomy.com Grayling Crystal Yang 415.593.1188 techonomy@grayling.com New York, NY, April 25, 2017 --( PR.com )-- GE’s Beth Comstock, Arianna Huffington of Thrive Global, and John Martin of Turner are among 60 speakers dissecting the role of tech on social and economic progress, and especially in health.Techonomy, a leading events and media company focused on helping organizations and executives prepare for the rapid pace of tech-enabled transformation, will hold two consecutive events, Techonomy Health & Techonomy NYC, in New York City on May 16th & 17th.“We love our home city in New York and we love helping leaders engage with ideas about tech-driven change, so we are especially proud to be doing that here for the second year in a row,” said David Kirkpatrick, CEO and Chief Techonomist and author of the bestselling book, The Facebook Effect: The Inside Story of the Company that is Connecting the World. "We're inviting techonomic thinkers to join us for either one or both of two days – Techonomy Health first, and then Techonomy NYC on May 17."Techonomy Health explores the vast potential tech holds to remake this $3 trillion U.S. industry. The program includes healthcare experts, technologists, policy makers and entrepreneurs for a high-energy discussion around topics including how AI and CRISPR will change the war on cancer, the future of consumer health information and media, the ethical and moral quandaries of enhancing the human genome, and what Trumpcare and Obamacare mean for health innovation. Speakers include Len Greer, President, Johnson & Johnson Health and Wellness; Meredith Guerriero, director for the healthcare industry at Facebook; Arianna Huffington, Founder and CEO, Thrive Global; John Mattison, Chief Medical Information Officer, Kaiser Permanente; celebrated author and holistic medicine expert Dean Ornish; Claudia González Romo, Executive Office of the Secretary General, UNICEF; Oscar CEO Mario Schlosser; Brent Shafer, CEO of Philips North America; and Steven Zatz, CEO of WebMD. (Full list below.)The following day, Techonomy NYC will be a New York-style version of Techonomy’s longstanding retreat in California, where last fall Mark Zuckerberg famously spoke about fake news. Techonomy NYC will ignite invigorating discourse around ongoing challenges relating to what a government led by Trump means for technology; the future of work in an on-demand gig economy; the digital and social fight against terrorism; and tough-to-answer questions about decision making power in an AI world, among many other topics. Speakers include Beth Comstock, Vice Chair of GE; Karin Klein, Head of Investing Activities at VC firm Bloomberg Beta; Environmental Defense Fund President Fred Krupp; Turner CEO John Martin; Miguel McKelvey, Co-founder and Chief Creative Officer of WeWork; Eli Pariser, Co-founder and Co-CEO of Upworthy; and General Assembly CEO Jake Schwartz. (Full list below.)Techonomy's partners for the conferences include Accenture, Celestica, Cognizant, Johnson & Johnson, Paypal, Philips, Pitney-Bowes, and Turner Broadcasting.Techonomy Health confirmed speakers include:Yonatan Adiri, Founder and CEO, Healthy.io and Founder, DisruptionLabs; Agnes Binagwaho Vice Chancellor, University of Global Health Equity; Jef Boeke, Director of the Institute for Systems Genetics, NYU Langone Medical Center; Walter De Brouwer, Founder and CEO, doc.ai; Brian Donley, Chief of Staff, Cleveland Clinic; David Ewing Duncan, Co-Founder, Curator and CEO, Arc Fusion; Esther Dyson, Chairman, EDventure Holdings; Katelyn Gleason, CEO & Cofounder, Eligible; Claudia González Romo, Executive Office of the Secretary General, UNICEF; Len Greer, President, Johnson & Johnson Health and Wellness Solutions; Meredith Guerriero, director for the healthcare industry at Facebook Ron Gutman, Founder and CEO, HealthTap; Jill Hagenkord, Chief Medical Officer, Color Genomics; Arianna Huffington, Founder and CEO, Thrive Global; Nancy J. Kelley, President and CEO, Nancy J. Kelley & Associates and Former Founding Executive Director, New York Genome Center; Robert Klitzman, Director, Masters of Bioethics Program, Joseph Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University; Tom Kottler, CEO, Co-Founder, HealthPrize Technologies; Steven Krein, Co-founder and CEO, StartUp Health; Andrew Kung, Chair and Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center; Kristin Lemkau, Chief Marketing Officer, JPMorgan Chase; Christian Madsbjerg, Senior Partner, ReD Associates; John Mattison, Chief Medical Information Officer, Kaiser Permanente; Dan Munro, Author; Alexi Nazem, Co-founder and CEO, Nomad Health; Lynn O'Connor Vos, Chief Executive Officer, Grey Healthcare Group (ghg); Dean Ornish, President and Director, Preventive Medicine Research Institute; Meredith Salisbury, Editorial Director, Bioscribe; Mario Schlosser, Co-founder and CEO, Oscar; Brent Shafer, CEO, Philips North America; Seth Sternberg, Co-founder and CEO, Honor; Andrew Thompson, Co-founder and CEO, Proteus Digital Health, Inc.; and Steven Zatz, CEO, WebMD.Current agenda and additional information can be found at www.techonomy.com/healthTechonomy NYC confirmed speakers include:Daniel Buchner, Senior PM - Head of Decentralized Identity at Microsoft, Microsoft; Beth Comstock, Vice Chair, GE; Meltem Demirors, Director, Development, Digital Currency Group; Diana Farrell, President and CEO, JPMorgan Chase Institute; Max Furmanov, Managing Director & Partner, Accenture; Andrea Glorioso, Counsellor, Digital Economy / Cyber, Delegation of the European Union to the USA; COL John Graham, Associate Dean for Research and Chief Scientist, United States Military Academy; Subramaniam Hariharan, VP Global Quality, Technology Innovation & Operational Excellence, Celestica; Jessi Hempel, Head of Editorial, Backchannel; Karin Klein, Head of Investing Activities, Bloomberg Beta; Fred Krupp, President, Environmental Defense Fund; Doreen Lorenzo, Co-founder, Vidlet Inc.; Director for the Center of Integrated Design, The University of Texas; Rachel Maguire, Research Director, Health Horizons Program, Institute for the Future; Gary Marcus, Professor, NYU; Founder, Geometric Intelligence (acquired by Uber); John Martin, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Turner; Miguel McKelvey, Co-founder and Chief Creative Officer, WeWork; Gregory McNeal, Co-Founder, AirMap; John Melkon, Center for the Study of Civil-Military Operations, United States Military Academy; Michael Monahan, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, Pitney Bowes; Eli Pariser, Co-founder and Co-CEO, Upworthy; Bre Pettis, Founder, Bre & Co.; Ernesto Quinteros, Chief Design Officer, Johnson & Johnson; Andrew Rasiej, Founder and Publisher, Personal Democracy Forum; Founder and CEO, Civic Hall; Slava Rubin, Chief Business Officer, Indiegogo; Julie Samuels, Executive Director, Tech:NYC; Jake Schwartz, Co-founder and CEO, General Assembly; Melanie Shapiro, Founder and CEO, Case; Oz Sultan, CEO, Sultan Interactive Group; Arun Sundararajan, Professor of Business, New York University; Author, "The Sharing Economy"; David Treat, Managing Director, Accenture; Bradley Tusk, Founder and CEO, Tusk Ventures; Michael J. Wolf, Co-founder and Managing Director, Activate, Inc.; and Tracy Young, CEO and Co-founder, PlanGrid.Current agenda and additional information can be found at www.techonomy.com/nycContacts:TechonomyJosh Kampel617.233.7722josh@techonomy.comGraylingCrystal Yang415.593.1188techonomy@grayling.com

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